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clutch question from newbie

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i have been doing work to the bike and am now putting it back together.(2003 yz250f) It has been 1.5 weeks with no oil on the clutch. I just got the gasket for the cover this morning and that is the last part to do other than test ride it. My question is should I soak the discs in oil before putting the cover back on? They are not new but I don't know if they can "dry out". Or is there something else I am not thinking of. Any help would be greatly appreciated! BTW-Great site!

Later

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I dont know if the fiber plates would dry out but its probably not a bad idea to soak them overnight. i would drill out the basket as well, I had a 2003 450 and that was the year that had some issues with the clutch draging. Do a search for drilling it out in the 450 forum, its well documented.

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id like some info on what you talking about since i also have a 2003 yz250f

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You shouldn't have to. Unless you spilled some cleaner on it it should be fine. But like stated, it wouldn't hurt one bit...

Drilling the basket however, takes oil away from the top end. I ahve found that by simply adding a SS oil filter, the grabby clutch issue is gone. Why? The improved oil flow!

The oil filter allows for a greater flow over a brass or paper filter. This increases the flow throughout the entire motor. When you are drilling the clutch basket, you are robbing oil away from the top end, and adding more to the clutch. Sure, you may remove the grabby clutch, but to what expense?

This was documented on my bike. I was using Castro GTX at the time, and with a brass filter, I would have a grabby clutch. Put in a Scotts and the grabby clutch went away. Same oil that I had been using, but just the oil filter changed it! Then, I switched to Rotella T synthetic, with a brass filter (just to see). Grabby clutch. With a Scotts, I had no grabby clutch.

Same thing with the new bike. Grabby clutch with the stock filter with Rotella Synthetic, but with the scotts it was gone.

So with the Scotts filter, you are getting:

A filter that can be cleaned for the lifetime of the bike (if you will keep the bike for over a year, it will pay for itself in one year)

Bette filtration rates

Vitrually no bypassing of the oil because of higher flow rates

Higher flow rates through the ENTIRE motor

It's a no-brainer.

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I was riding in some trails and the clutch cable broke. Had to force shift it and rode it out for about 4 miles in 2nd.(SLOWLY!) When I replaced the cable the clutch plates seemed to be stickiing. So i removed them and inspected them. No bad sign of wear, just "sticky". I went ahead and replaced the tension spring on the clutch shaft and put it back together. But due to my local dealer who cannot seem to order the right parts it took about a week and half to get everything to put it back together, so I was just concerned with the clutch not having oil on them. Next oil change I will probably replace the plates and springs since this is the probably the original clutch. (I am the 2nd owner) Let me know what you have done to your bike and things you see wrong if you don't mind to sort of give me a heads up. Later.

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You shouldn't have to. Unless you spilled some cleaner on it it should be fine. But like stated, it wouldn't hurt one bit...

Drilling the basket however, takes oil away from the top end. I ahve found that by simply adding a SS oil filter, the grabby clutch issue is gone. Why? The improved oil flow!

The oil filter allows for a greater flow over a brass or paper filter. This increases the flow throughout the entire motor. When you are drilling the clutch basket, you are robbing oil away from the top end, and adding more to the clutch. Sure, you may remove the grabby clutch, but to what expense?

This was documented on my bike. I was using Castro GTX at the time, and with a brass filter, I would have a grabby clutch. Put in a Scotts and the grabby clutch went away. Same oil that I had been using, but just the oil filter changed it! Then, I switched to Rotella T synthetic, with a brass filter (just to see). Grabby clutch. With a Scotts, I had no grabby clutch.

Same thing with the new bike. Grabby clutch with the stock filter with Rotella Synthetic, but with the scotts it was gone.

So with the Scotts filter, you are getting:

A filter that can be cleaned for the lifetime of the bike (if you will keep the bike for over a year, it will pay for itself in one year)

Bette filtration rates

Vitrually no bypassing of the oil because of higher flow rates

Higher flow rates through the ENTIRE motor

It's a no-brainer.

I had the Scotts filter on my 450 and I loved it, I shied away from it on the 250 because there were so many conflicting stories about oil flow. But what you are saying makes perfect sense. Remember, i prefaced my comment about drilling out the basket by saying that it was 450 issue mostly. You can do it but you do run the risk of taking oil from other places, especially if you drill too many or too big holes. I am going to try the Scotts again, it seems like guys with the newer (06/07) YZF's are having success with them.

Is there anyone else that noticed if their clutch performed better after using the SS filter?? You might be on to something here.:applause:

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