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New 2007 DRZ E

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:lol: Old fart, new bike. Climbed off my turbo Busa onto the DRZ. I've been reading here alot. Checked my Race sag, ordered some accessories here (full Yosh and jets), and did some little free mods I learned here. I have to decrease the sag an inch tomorrow.

Something I have found is there is no safety switch on the kickstand. Great!

The top of the filter box has a 4"X4" square piece of rubber that holds the snorkel. I simply removed it and the snorkel, and now have a 4X4 hole in the top of the air box. Is that sufficient or do I need to make some more holes somewhere?

The suspension: The bike feels very unstable and always on the verge of tossing me off. I'm 6' 2" weigh 250 lbs so that's probably the problem? Any suspension suggestions to help keep an old fat man from falling off?:applause:

Enjoy your board and the camaraderie here immensely. I'll be here for awhile.

Dale

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Over sag the rear suspension. That makes em really stable. You loose a little suspension, but its worth it. Raising the tripple clamps on the forks has the same effect. Suspension dampening settings can also help, but I would have to ride your bike and Oklahoma is a bit of a ride. :lol: See if you can find anyone local that knows how to adjust it right. :applause:

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It's not a matter of adjusting. Sorry to say but the bike is running in overload. The suspension on the bike was targeted for about 170lbs. The bike needs new fork and shock springs to hold it up to make it behave properly. You will see here revalve is suggested to go along with the springs. Go to race tech's web site and you will get the recommended spring rates for front and rear. Just enter your weight and it shows the stock springs and the recommended. I'm at 190 lbs and I'm going to respring even though the bike is OK for me. I kind of fit the old fart category but the front end needs some support.. I don't push it too hard so its done alright

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Damping can compensate. (Its not perfect, but close) If you wanna see the effect the spring has vs. the dampening, try taking all the oil out sometime. The physics behind a spring mass system is quite simple, it produces simple harmonic motion (continuous bouncing). Adding a dampener (ie forks and shock 'everthing besides the spring') is what absorbs the input of any external force. (ie the bump on the ground) I am not trying to start an argument by any means, just sharing my education in physics. :lol: I agree with SwampDigger, ideally you want to get the proper springs for your weight, it will keep the geometry of the bike correct as you ride down the trail. :applause: However, with sufficient dampening adjustment, you can get the bike to perform at 95% with no extra $$ invested.

As far as changing the geometry of the bike by going outside factory recomended specs, the more the forks are raked out, the slower the bike will turn. This causes extra stability and can be accomplished by doing the adjustments I described earlier. :lol:

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for your weight i would definitly respring it.its a night and day difference

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for your weight i would definitly respring it.its a night and day difference

Thanks to all you guys for the help. I never thought about a re-spring. I'm headed to Racetech's site to look around.

Dale

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I weigh about the same as you and started off with a beefier rear spring and always thought the front was fine. If you don't want to spend too much, I'd start with the rear only. Worked for me.

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