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weight distirbution hich

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Im looking to buy a toy hauler. 20' and 5000lbs dry weight no more than 7000lbs loaded. I will tow with a 03 dodge ram 3/4 ton deisel with a 140" weel base. Its a quad cab short bed. I am trying to learn about weight distribution hitch. Do I need one? They look like a pain too install. Is this true even after you get it all set up? How do they do when off road? Can some one explain about what types are available and their differances?

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Im looking to buy a toy hauler. 20' and 5000lbs dry weight no more than 7000lbs loaded. I will tow with a 03 dodge ram 3/4 ton deisel with a 140" weel base. Its a quad cab short bed. I am trying to learn about weight distribution hitch. Do I need one? They look like a pain too install. Is this true even after you get it all set up? How do they do when off road? Can some one explain about what types are available and their differances?

They will get rid of the "up-down" tounge movement. It basically makes the trailer and truck frame feel like one frame insteads of two seperate frames, It allows side to side for turning, but reduces or eliminates up and down. I dont know if I would worry about it. Tow without it and see how it goes. If it needs it, expect to pay closer to about $750-1000 for the whole setup, its spendy and you may not need it.

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Thanks for the reply. Maybe you can enlighten me on sway control? Is that something I should use? Are there differant types?

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The weight distributing hitch is exactly that. It helps distribute the tongue weight of the trailer not just to the rear axel of the tow vehicle but also to the front axel. Without the WD hitch the hitch ball is the verticle pivot point of the trailer truck connection. Touch the ends of your pointer fingers. Now move your left pointer finger down (this will simulate the tongue weight of the trailer (left finger) on the truck ball(right finger). Can you see this "verticle pivot point". See how your right pointer finger follows. Now have someone put a tooth pick under your pointer fingers and use a bag tie to hold it on to each finger. Can you see how the tooth pick won't allow or severly limits the pivot point movement? That is what the WD hitch is doing. The WD bars connect into the hitch on the truck and the chains on the other end of the bars connect into a holder on the trailer tongue. Connecting the end chain link to the trailer tongue is the least spring pressure on the bars and thus allowing more verticle movement at the ball. Using the chain links closer and closer to the bar ends will provide more spring pressure to the bars thus reducing the effect of the trailer wanting to push down the rear axel springs of the truck. I have an 05 3/4 Quad cab Ram 4x4, SB,gas, pull a 27 foot TT, 7000#, my WD bars are connected on the very end chain link (almost don't need the WD hitch set up). Once you get off the road and onto rough or whooped out trail you need to disconnect the WD bars or the truck hitch will see very high stress and eventual damage. As far as a sway control set up, IMHO it is as scare tactic used to sell to people who don't know how to properly set up their trailer. Have the weight of all your stuff equally distributed along the length of the trailer. Have the trailer frame perfecly level to the ground (you need to have an adjustable hitch on the truck to acheive this). Have a trailer brake contoller so you can appply the trailer brakes independantly of the tow vehicle to help bring it back in line if something happens. Make gentle steering inputs. Hope this helps out some:ride:

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Thanks for the reply. Maybe you can enlighten me on sway control? Is that something I should use? Are there differant types?
Sway control is all together another issue. There is a sway control unit that used friction. It reduced left to right, while the WD hitch reduces up and down. More money, but under $100 for the sway control.

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I agree 100% with Matt90gt,

I would not tow a Toyhauler without a WD hitch and I tow with a 2500HD Duramax. Toyhaulers are notoriously "tounge heavy" and if your holding tanks are near the front (like most TH's are) your tounge weight is even greater on your drive home after you've pumped most of your fresh water into the black and gray tanks.

My Weekend Warrior FS2600 had a tounge weight of 1600lbs loaded and ready to go with no water in the holding (black and gray) tanks.

By the way, 1600lbs is over the weight rating for most peoples hitch even with the WD bars. I ended up putting a class 5 hitch on my truck for piece of mind.

My current trailer uses a WD hitch made by Equalizer. www.equalizerhitch.com It incorporates WD as well as sway control into the hitch with nothing else to hook up. This is by far the best WD hitch I've ever owned.

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I would definately get a WD hitch and sway bar. When we tow without them - just around town to the dealer and such - you can definately tell.

Once you get it all set up it takes just a minute to put them both on and off.

We won't travel without both of them.

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If you set it up right you will not to un hook the wd hiych off road, I never do and so do many others.

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get the reese dual cam system it controls bounce up/down and sway.

i pull with a 1500 and have never had a sway problem.

if you go the speed limit you're probably fine but i would definently get w/d

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I'm towing a travel trailer with the bikes in the pickup. Trailer about 6500# and sometimes two street bikes (1000 #) in Dodge Ram Diesel bed. I have the reese weight distribution hitch and really feel the truck doesn't need it for the weight, although I use it to be safe. It's not much trouble at all. But since you're talking toy hauler with high tongue weight and possibility for a lot of fluids, I would use one. You can always transfer the WD system if you upgrade to larger trailer in the future.

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If you set it up right you will not to un hook the wd hiych off road, I never do and so do many others.

If it is set up right, a WD hitch will not allow much up/down movement at the hitch point, and leaving it attached in rough off-road conditions may cause not only damage to the bars, but also to the trailer or truck frame.

The WD hitch tries to not allow the trailer to articulate freely (which is the idea), but in slow-speed, rough conditions, this can transmit many times the force that the frames or fasteners are designed to handle.

I would recommend unhooking the bars before heading into an area that is going to contain steep dips, high angle hilltops, and rough conditions.

That, and who goes fast enough off-road to need a WD hitch? The cupboards would be empty! (Visualize all your kitchen stuff strewn across the trailer)

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I would strongly recommend using a weight-distribution hitch. Once you have it properly installed, it adds less than 60 seconds to hitch up or unhitch. You may not really need it for normal towing, but you are going to wish you had it when you get onto rough roads, into strong, gusty winds and possibly evasive driving manuevers.

I have never needed to disconnect mine while towing. Try several different settings while towing to help you decide on the proper amount of tension. If you end up at the extreme end of the adjustment range, consult a hitch dealer about getting heavier or lighter bars and try again. If you are unable to find a setting that feels comfortable, try shifting the weight inside the trailer to change the tongue weight.

The weight-distribution hitch, itself, will help reduce some of the sway. Low air pressure in your truck tires will affect sway, as well. If the trailer has two or more axles, they will help reduce sway, too.

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