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I am going to be racing harescrambles this year and i have been practicing alot and I have found that I am having some problems with turns. Flat turns getr me real bad. I cant seem to carry any speed through them I always slow down alot. If I could get the curves figured out i could do alot better in races.

I have been concentrating on getting my weight to the outside peg and looking ahead but my front wheel always wants to slide out and doesnt want to stick in the curves. Evan in slight curves it slides out. Do I need to adjust the clickers a certain way or is there something i am doin wrong? My front wheel also tries to bounse around when i get going faster on small bumps. Any tips would be great thanks

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Not sure about your suspension set up but do a search for your question here you'll find tons of info. I can tell you this when turn on big turns like that if you coast you will slide out the front. You need to either be on the brakes or on the gas no coasting. Believe it or not when you hit the gas after braking for the corner it plants your front. I'm certainly not an expert but this is what I've learned. If you're going to do harescrambles I don't know how often you'll have that big wide turns to contend with. It took me longer to learn how to use gas and rear brakes to position the rear for tight woods turning. (not that I'm good at it)

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Make sure you have 25% of your available fork travel in rider sag and 33-34% of available rear wheel travel in rider sag. If you have too much rear sag it will make the front end push as well as not having enough front fork sag to allow the bike to setup for the corners. Good tires and 12PSI help too.

Sit forward on the seat and lean over the bars. Throw your inside leg forward with your foot near front axle. Your foot shouldn't be on the ground.

Dwight

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pull a Malcom Smith and slide that back end like nothing ealse---try looking for any ruts if you do not feel comfortable on flat turns, chance are you will find a little sliver on the out side.

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Just want to emphasize again what Dwight said. You have to sit as far forward as you can and get the inside leg out in front so your weighting that front wheel. When I weight the outside peg I like to be sitting on the outside seam of the seat as well. Do this drill. Find a large flat area and turn in a circle. Elbows up, outside peg weighted, butt on the seam, front of the seat, inside leg in front. As you circle around you can make adjustments to your riding position to get it perfect. It's not like practicing a single turn where you have little time to think about position, your in and out before you know it. As you circle, make adjustments to your position and increase your speed so you're at a greater lean angle. Soon you will begin to find the limits of traction with both front and rear wheels and you'll see what effect body position has on these limits. Even on a flat, slick surface you will be amazed at how the front end will stick if your body position is correct. Clearly you want to do this drill in both directions. Practice every time you go out for 15 or 20 minutes, you'll see big improvement quickly.

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I put my tire pressure to 14, and it has not failed me yet--seems to work great on the sand, but on the hard packed, I tend to slide on braking....have to work the bike a bit more you know.

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find a big open flat area and put down 2 cones or w/e you want and do figure 8's keep practicing and you will build some confidence and know how your bike will handle.

keep practicing until you can do them consistently perfect, then hit the trails

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Not sure about your suspension set up but do a search for your question here you'll find tons of info. I can tell you this when turn on big turns like that if you coast you will slide out the front. You need to either be on the brakes or on the gas no coasting. Believe it or not when you hit the gas after braking for the corner it plants your front. I'm certainly not an expert but this is what I've learned. If you're going to do harescrambles I don't know how often you'll have that big wide turns to contend with. It took me longer to learn how to use gas and rear brakes to position the rear for tight woods turning. (not that I'm good at it)

I took this advise as well as the other advise and put it all together and went out today to practice and i finally have them figured out. I feel so much faster now that i can take curves better thanks alot guys.

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Also be aware of your shoulders and your hips. Drop your inside shoulder and turn your body with your hips. Use your body to turn the bike, don't let the bike turn your body. You can see road racers use this technique and they certainly turn on flat corners. Too many times when you are concentrating on putting your body weight on the outside peg you will pick up your inside shoulder too much and turn your hips in the opposite direction of the turn.

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Try lowering the forks in the triple clamps. 10mm made a huge difference to my DRZ for turning and didn't really affect the straight line stability. For fun, I tried 15mm and the bike really turned quickly, I just seemed to think about it and it happened, but it was way to twitchy on the straight sections.

I sucked at turning until I basically did what the others suggested; setup the bike, get up on the front and practice it. One more thing, trails are different than motocross in that you don't charge from one turn to the next, the secret is keeping a smooth consistant speed which means carry the speed through the turns. Don't use the brakes much. I find engine braking on the four-stroke is usually enough. Don't be afraid to lay the bike over, if your wieght and power are correct the front end should stick.

Another trick. In the tight woods I was always hunting between first and second gear, downshifting for the turns, upshifting on the straights. I was much faster, and smoother, when I forced myself to run a gear higher and use the clutch to accelerate out of the turns. Not shifting in the turns upset the bike less and let my carry speed without having to work hard for it.

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