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I am going to run 40:1 in the 2001 CR250 I just purchased, can anyone suggest a good oil? I am currently running Amsoil synthetic 50:1 in my 1999 CR125. I don't know and did not tune my new bike so I think I will stick with 40:1. Or can I just use the 50:1 oil I am currently buying and just mix it at 40:1 ratio?

Thanks,

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i always hear 32:1 is the best, less oil i.e 50:1 means less engine protection

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Stick with 32:1. Re-jet if necessary. Oil is cheaper than a re-build. I use Klotz R-50. I have heard good things about Maxima K-2.:applause:

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I am going to run 40:1 in the 2001 CR250 I just purchased, can anyone suggest a good oil? I am currently running Amsoil synthetic 50:1 in my 1999 CR125. I don't know and did not tune my new bike so I think I will stick with 40:1. Or can I just use the 50:1 oil I am currently buying and just mix it at 40:1 ratio?

Thanks,

motul 800 off-road 2T at 40 : 1 (25ml for every 1-liter gasoline) for your CR's

see pic below...

picture447bv8.jpg

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In my 2001 CR250 I will run Yamalube 2R at 32:1. Been workin for me. Most oils are good, but I'd stick with 32:1...more lube for the bearings.

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Running 50:1 is like only putting 2 quarts of oil in your car when it needs 5 quarts. I would always stick with 32:1 as others have mentioned.

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i run 32:1 with honda hp2, like it has been said, you should run 32:1 and rejet to run that, its better on your engine

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btw...i use castral 927 i believe the name is...its a black bottle with a gold label...hmm been too long since ive filled my bike up...forgetting oils names..damned winter

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Hey guys im am thinking of buying a cr125 what should the fuel mix be ? Is 35:1 good ?

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Read your manual, it says 32:1, they built the engine. I would trust them before some guy who says I've been running something else with no problems! Jet your bike right and it will run perfect, and protect it.

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I just rebuilt my 99 CR125 today I have been running 50:1 amsoil synthetic for at least 50 hours of riding and every thing looked great. Nothing was gummed up, no carbon deposits and hardly any wear to the piston and cyl. I am very impressed. There is also more than enough oil in there for lubrication.

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I used to run either Yamalube or whatever or Amsoil in at either 40.1 or 50.1 in my LT250R. I'd run those mostly as they were what I could easily get but I've run several kinds of oil. Since I got the 500 I've always run Honda HP2 at 32.1 in it and since I've started doing that thats what I run in all my 2-strokes.

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btw...i use castral 927 i believe the name is...its a black bottle with a gold label...hmm been too long since ive filled my bike up...forgetting oils names..damned winter

Maxima 927 is a very good oil! I have ran it for years. A lot of people do not kow about the protective properties of Castor Oil. The hotter the engine gets, the better it lubes. Caster is drawn to hot metal and will stick to it. Long after other oils have vaporized castor is still doing its job. Even if it does vaporize or burn the residue is high in lubicity. A lot fo people dont like Castor because they say it gums up the powervalves. Maxima 927 has degummer's in it. I have over 137 hard miles on my current top end. A Wiseco at .0025 clearance....that makes people wince (CR500). And yes I am jetted correctly.

Good reading:

Castor oil's high lubricity (reduces friction) is superior to petroleum-based lubricants; for instance, it really clings to metal, especially hot metal, and is used in racing and jet (turbine) engines. In addition, Castor oil is non-toxic and quickly biodegrades; whereas, petroleum-based oils are potential health hazards, and take a very long time to biodegrade, thus can damage the environment when concentrated [19].

Castor oil is non-drying oil (slow to oxidize); thus, it remains liquid for a long time. As a result, it's naturally a good lubricant

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castor_oil

http://www.foxvalleykart.com/oil1.html

Castor oil is not normally soluble in ordinary petroleum oils, but if you polymerize it for several hours at 300 degrees F (149 deg C), the polymerized oil becomes soluble. Hydrogenation achieves somewhat the same effect.

Castor oil has other unique properties. It is highly polar and has a great affinity for metal surfaces. It has a flash point of only 445 degrees F (229 deg C), but its fire point is about 840 degrees F (449 deg C)! This is very unusual behavior if you consider that polyalkylene glycols flash at about 350-400 degrees F (176-204 deg C)and have a fire point of only about 550 degrees F (288 deg C), or slightly higher. Nearly all of the common synthetics that we use burn in the combustion chamber if you get off too lean. Castor oil does not, because it is busily forming more and more complex polymers as the temperature goes up. Most synthetics boil on the cylinder walls at temperatures slightly above their flash point. The same activity can take place in the wrist pin area, depending on engine design.

Synthetics also have another interesting feature - they would like to return to the materials from which they were made, usually things like ethylene oxide, complex alcohols, or other less suitable lubricants. This happens very rapidly when a critical temperature is reached. We call this phenomena "unzippering" for obvious reasons. So, you have a choice. Run the engine too lean and it gets too hot. The synthetic burns or simply vaporizes, but castor oil decomposes into a soft varnish and a series of ester groups that still have powerful lubricity. Good reason for a mix of the two lubricants!

In spite of all this, the synthetics are still excellent lubricants if you know their limitations and work within those limits. Used properly, engine life will be good with either product. Cooked on a lean run, castor oil will win every time. A mix of the two can give the best of both worlds. Most glo engines can get by with only a little castor oil in the oil mix, but diesels, with their higher cooling loads and heavier wrist pin pressures, thrive on more castor oil in the mix.

http://www.go-cl.se/castor.html

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are you saying, use half castor and half synthetic? you said "Most glo engines can get by with only a little castor oil in the oil mix, but diesels, with their higher cooling loads and heavier wrist pin pressures, thrive on more castor oil in the mix" if so, what other oil do you prefer to mix castor n gas with? if im wrong, i feel dumb, thanks for the detailed post about castor oil, ive always heard its the best oil but it gums up, plus it smells good when it burns.

also, what is the best smelling oil out? any opinions would be awesome, thanks!

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Read what Rob said!!:applause:

What oil and how much all depend on the state of tune of the motor, its rpm range and how you run it. In our road race motors, such as a rotary valve 125 that could hit 16,000rpm easily, we ran 7-8oz oil with a castor/synthetic blend at a 3:1 ratio of synthetic to castor....precisely for the reasons Rob mentioned. Just do a search on posts I've made and "castor" and you'll find similar posts saying the same basic thing!!

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