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How long do suspension springs last for?

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my bike has 100 h and I'm selling it. Does it worth to take them out and put the originals? Thanks!!

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With only 100 hours on your suspension, I doubt that you should have a concern about your springs being worn out!

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Until they break. Modern coil shock springs don't "wear out".....Find someone who tells you otherwise and i will show you someone who does not know a whole lot about suspension. They are good for the life of the motorcycle, and the next one which steals some part off it.

They are good for the half life of the "spring steel" memory molecules that the alloy is comprised of. Which is a couple hundred thousand years at minimum.

Clutch springs and valve springs have very similar characteristics however they are exposed to something that actually can deform a spring, this being excessive heat.

Its not like you are bending the metal as if it is a regular piece of steel. You are winding and unwinding by forcing and releasing the load. The molecules naturally go back to their sustained position and shape, every time. It is just basic physics.

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Until they break. Modern coil shock springs don't "wear out".....Find someone who tells you otherwise and i will show you someone who does not know a whole lot about suspension. They are good for the life of the motorcycle, and the next one which steals some part off it.

They are good for the half life of the "spring steel" memory molecules that the alloy is comprised of. Which is a couple hundred thousand years at minimum.

Clutch springs and valve springs have very similar characteristics however they are exposed to something that actually can deform a spring, this being excessive heat.

Its not like you are bending the metal as if it is a regular piece of steel. You are winding and unwinding by forcing and releasing the load. The molecules naturally go back to their sustained position and shape, every time. It is just basic physics.

Interesting theory but I don't believe it. I have talked to a few suspension tuners that say that springs can "sack out". I'm no engineer and know nothing about molecules but I do know that metal fatigues.

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Technically Hondarider5 (I bet youve got a special clock set to go off when you graduate MMI ) is right, but thats also perfect world.

Id suggest if the suspension is still working for you the springs are probably ok, and if they are substantially different than the OEM spring, swap them and keep them.

I havent heard of a spring sacking out (suspension) in years and years. Valve springs on the other hand are a completely different matter.

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Interesting theory but I don't believe it. I have talked to a few suspension tuners that say that springs can "sack out". I'm no engineer and know nothing about molecules but I do know that metal fatigues.

And if i owned a suspension shop i would try to sell springs to every customer as well. But that is what i understand, and know. And It has been backed up bu many other techs i work with. I know for sure it is Race Techs way of thinking as well considering that is how they even teach the concept in their seminars.

This is not my "theory" it is just fact.

Remember i am talking about MODERN suspension springs.

Springs can be damaged still, but not from compressing and unloading within their designed range. All they do is store energy and release it.

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Technically Hondarider5 (I bet youve got a special clock set to go off when you graduate MMI ) is right, but thats also perfect world.

Id suggest if the suspension is still working for you the springs are probably ok, and if they are substantially different than the OEM spring, swap them and keep them.

I havent heard of a spring sacking out (suspension) in years and years. Valve springs on the other hand are a completely different matter.

73 days.....but who is counting.

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