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Tube Type Trials Tires

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You guys got me hooked. Next set of tires on my KLX250S will be Trials type. What about Rim Locks? At what pressure should I think about installing locks? And are they different for tube or tubeless tires? :applause:

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I run @ 8 lbs and use two BIG Moose aluminum rim locks. I've sheared off several valve stems - always in the BRAKING direction, but none since I installed the second rim lock. The tube type trials tires seat the bead better than the tubeless - and it stays seated. I've had good luck with the IRC tire - great traction and lasted almost 1000 miles of pretty hard riding. Have fun - it is a different type of traction, once you learn not to spin the tire it will climb anything.

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You guys got me hooked. Next set of tires on my KLX250S will be Trials type. What about Rim Locks? At what pressure should I think about installing locks? And are they different for tube or tubeless tires? :applause:

The Dunlop will have the stiffest Sidewall, probably good for what you are doing since your Bike outweighs a Trials Bike by a LOT!

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Guys:

Remember trials bikes weight a lot less than a KLX. Also on a trials bike you stand all the time. You will have to learn to stand more on the KLX due to the fact you can shift your weight more in that position. Forward/rearward weighting will be important to load the tire as to gain traction. Trials bikes also have the pegs moved towards the rear as to your bike. you can shift your feet on the pegs.

It will definitely be a learning experience with major benefits if you can listen and feel what your bike is doing. Trials develops skills in a different way than the old just pin it and hang on.

Try rolling out from a dead stop on a safe hill climb your used to doing, but start at the bottom, instead of getting a run at it. Learn to slowly roll the throttle and feel for traction. Play with air pressures Start with 5 lbs, and get good digital gauge.

Have fun and good luck!

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Don't worry about the weight difference in bikes. Yes, a Trials Bike might weigh about 100 pounds less than your bike, but many Trials Riders make up for that in their own body weight (I know I do) and it doesn't hurt the tire. In fact, as a Trials Rider, you have to learn how to get more weight on the rear tire in certain low traction conditions.

We quite often ride with the front tire an inch or two above the ground with ALL of the bike and our body weight on the rear tire only and THEN, if that weren't enough (and it quite often isn't) we even JUMP to increase the rear tire weight.

I frequently hear people making bike weight an issue, but it isn't. You add or subtract pressure in the tire to get the correct flex pattern and square inches of tire contact. A Trials tire is NOT supposed to be totally round. Like most other Radial tires, the sidewalls must bulge and flex to allow more rubber contact in the tread area. The larger tread surface and the ability of the tread to shape to the ground is where the traction is. Back to my Golf ball Video if you don't know what I'm talking about. :applause:

http://home.comcast.net/~jc-long/clips/trials-tire-test2.wmv

However, the rest of the information above is good. Use 2 rim locks if you can but most important, DO NOT tighten the little stem nut against the wheel. Take it off or screw it up tight to the cap and CHECK YOUR VALVE STEM ANGLE OFTEN. If the valve stem tips more than about 15 degrees, take a break, let the air out of your tire, back off the rim locks, break the tire bead loose from the rim and with the rear tire still on the bike and the rear in the air. Put the bike in gear and give a good yank on the tire in the opposite direction to get the valve back to straight up out of it's hole. Use a soapy water solution if you need to lube the tire and to help the bead seat again when you inflate it..If you are on the trail, use anything wet. Check to make sure the tube is out of the way before you inflate the tire. Takes only 15 minutes at the most.

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