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I bent my rim

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I bent the rear rim on my CR250 last night trying to change a tire. The lip was bent on one side, and it looks flatened a little. I bent the lip back in my vise. There's still a small flattened area. And now I have some nice marks on the rim. I'm still not sure how I bent it. I was pretty careful and it took a lot of force to bend it back. The spokes didn't lossen; some were slightly loose, but no more than I usually have to tighten before a ride

Should I run it or just buy a new rim? If I get a new one, it won't be anything special. The best price I found was a ProWheel.

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You must not have had the opposite side of the tire in the valley of the rim. Man, that sucks. My guess (hard to say without seeing it) would be that, if it's not cracked and runs pretty true, you'd be okay using it. Post a pic though if you get the chance.

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Well, I went cheaper. I checked a small local shop 5 mins from work and he had a used Honda rim laying around. I gave him $40 for it. He told me I probably didn't bend the rim getting the tire off, probably was like that before. I'm guessing I could have run it, but the $40 wheel looks a lot better than my hack job striagtened one.

I'm going to try to lace it tonight and bring it back in to have my Maxxis IT mounted. I'm not wrestling with that tire:eek:

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I wouldn't concern myself with a slightly bent rim. I've brought some badly bent rims back into use with proper hammer blows and some vice work. It's when the deep inner spoke area of the rim gets out of shape that I immediately relace a rim. Little wows in the rim don't make much difference and I prefer to straighten before relacing as it gets me back on the bike sooner without losing a week-ends of riding waiting for a rim to come in.

On the other hand, relacing a wheel isn't that hard to do if you take your time. 30 minutes with a pointer taped to your forks or swing arm is my poor man's method of truing for axial and concentric run-out.

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No, it isn't that hard if you take your time. I learned last night why shops charge so much for lacing a wheel. It takes forever. I started at 7:45 pm. It took me two hours to get the spokes detached from my old rim. At least two-thirds of the spokes were stubborn and took multiple doses of WD-40 and vise grips to get off. I got the new rim laced and gave up truing at midnight. I'm taking the wheel to the shop today for truing and tire mounting. Hopefully they can do it today. Otherwise, instead of riding, I'll spend all day Saturday loosening and tighening spokes. New spokes would make it eaiser. Just take a cutoof wheel or a pair of snips and cut the old ones off. I may end up doing that, but I was trying to go cheap and use the old ones. Either way, it's a wonderfull experience.

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I've heard the Maxxis IT is a difficult tire to mount. I bought the Maxxis C6001 and had to have it done on a machine. It's such a hard tire, I would've bent my rim trying to do it.

However a slightly bent edge doesn't seem that bad on a tire. For $40, you can't beat having a replacement around. Keep your old one for backup.

Good luck truing. Cost me $90 to have it laced and trued. They got it pretty damn percise though.

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