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One of my friend does trials. I was interested in what training methods would be effective to build more balance. I am thinking of trying out trials.

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One of my friend does trials. I was interested in what training methods would be effective to build more balance. I am thinking of trying out trials.

Well nothing beats actual practice on your bike. But some good cross training and workouts i find is bicycle riding and yoga for core strength and balance.

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Well nothing beats actual practice on your bike. But some good cross training and workouts i find is bicycle riding and yoga for core strength and balance.

Bingo! I second that! :applause:

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BTW, the Trials Training Center has some good information in writing and in photos and video clips on their web site that can be very helpful. Take a look at:

http://www.trialstrainingcenter.com/

Look at the "How to Ride" section. The link button for it is on the left of the main page.

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This might sound crazy but leaning back on my chair at school has helped some. Now I can balance my chair on the back legs and it has helped me to find the balance point while riding.It also helps wheelies alot

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how hard is it to learn to balence standing still? Is it the kind of thing that comes more quicky than most of you expected, or does it take forever to slowly get it. I'm getting a bike on friday and doing my first competition on sunday :thumbsup:

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Depends on who you are, but I'm thinking that stationary balance probably doesn't come to very many people before they've put a lot of hours on the bike. I ride a lot, 3-4 hours a week and it has taken me months to be able to consistantly balance for more than a second or two.

Grant

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Funny thing is... You have to learn everything twice. Once for just practicing and goofing around. Then you have to learn how to do everything during a competition. Everything seems a lot harder inside the ribbon!

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Funny thing is... You have to learn everything twice. Once for just practicing and goofing around. Then you have to learn how to do everything during a competition. Everything seems a lot harder inside the ribbon!

LOL. That is so amazingly true!

Balance took me a few months of practicing almost every nite in the garage (though i still can't do it between the ribbons :thumbsup: ). Now I am working on hopping. I figure a few more months of practice and I will be able to do it fairly consistently in the garage -- and no ETA when I will be able to do it between the ribbons... LOL.

BTW: The trick I learned about balancing is to NOT use your lower body by leaning on the footpegs. But using the bars -- held VERY lightly (you should be able todo it one handed.) Once you get it it should just kinda click.

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how hard is it to learn to balence standing still? Is it the kind of thing that comes more quicky than most of you expected, or does it take forever to slowly get it. I'm getting a bike on friday and doing my first competition on sunday :thumbsup:

how good is your balance?

how much saddle time do you have?

I tried in the garage and just could not do it

finally gave up

and wouldn't you know it, with all the slow turning drills

suddenly it was there, not 100% but a lot of it

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how good is your balance?

how much saddle time do you have?

I tried in the garage and just could not do it

finally gave up

and wouldn't you know it, with all the slow turning drills

suddenly it was there, not 100% but a lot of it

Yes, a good way to learn how to balance at a stop is to slowly come to a stop. Going downhill is easier because you only need to release the brakes to regain forward motion and balance. Then slow down to another stop and try to RELAX. The more you strain or struggle to keep your balance, the more difficult it is.

It also helps to look up and ahead instead of at the ground or close to your tire.

:thumbsup:

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I have a fair amount of "slow easy going" time on my dad's bike (not trials), and I can balence for 2 or three seconds coming to a stop on a bicycle. I can also ride up a hill ,freewheel to a stop, roll back a foot and keep going forward if that makes a difference. I hope this makes my question a bit easier.

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I have a fair amount of "slow easy going" time on my dad's bike (not trials), and I can balence for 2 or three seconds coming to a stop on a bicycle. I can also ride up a hill ,freewheel to a stop, roll back a foot and keep going forward if that makes a difference. I hope this makes my question a bit easier.

Cool.. you've got a good start. Now, when riding your Trials Bike in tight areas, just practice coming to a stop when you need to survey the trail ahead. and do it often.

sometimes when I stop on some of our trail rides to wait for friends to check in before the next section, I try to see if I can remain balanced until they arrive.

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Funny thing is... You have to learn everything twice. Once for just practicing and goofing around. Then you have to learn how to do everything during a competition. Everything seems a lot harder inside the ribbon!

How true!:thumbsup:

Back when I was competitive in trials I would use trials bicycles to practice techniques. Man is it a great aerobic workout too! Jordi Tarres (7X world champion) brought alot of trials bicycle techniques to the motorcycles trials world. The stuff you see today with riders hoping only on the rear tire came from bicycle trials.

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