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Static Battery Drain for S

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What are folks measuring for static current draw on an S (key off). I just measured mine and it's 1.7 mA, which is outside the 1 mA spec that Suzuiki says is normal. My 06 is is slightly out of warranty, but I suspect I could get the instrument cluster replaced (which I assume is the source of the draw) under goodwill if I ask. But I don't want to bother if my bike if a new cluster is likely to be the same.

As context, I'm having issues with the battery being flat between rides that are two or three weeks apart. I've replaced the battery once and have started using a charger more, but I'm a little unclear why a 1.66 mA drain should be causing a flat battery after a few weeks - by my calcuations, three weeks at 1.66 mA is less than 1 amp-hour out of a 7 amp-hour battery. My rides may only be a few miles, so perhaps I'm not riding a long enough distance to get things fully charged again and things gradually go downhill over a couple months.

- Mark

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Should be less than 1 milliamp. you would want to unplug the cluster to confirm that is the sucker of the electrical power. If the draw is still up there, I'd unplug the Reg/Rect and test again.

Did you do a charging test to confirm voltages with the engine running?

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showpost.php?p=4033461

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=70551

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No, I haven't done any charging tests as the bike is down for carb work.

With things apart, I went ahead and did some trouble shooting on the current draw:

0.4 mA from the regulator/rectifier

1.3 mA from the instrument cluster

I don't know whether this is worth hassling the dealer about or not.

- Mark

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Your draw from the RR is the same as mine and is within the Suzuki spec. (Oddly enought Suzuki has the same spec for E and S bikes) I do not know what is common for the S. I have been asking that question for years but this is the 1st post with actual numbers I have seen.

As for the battery, keep in mind that a 7 amp hr battery does not have 7 useable amp hrs. Only about the 1st 1/3 is useable. So the battery is going to look dead after draining 2 to 3 amp hrs. And that is assuming you are starting from a fully charged battery which most are not. I think your analysis is correct. Short rides and long sits make for low battery. I would do a full check out of the charging system and determine what voltage your maintenance charger is keeping the battery at.

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I'm sorry, I know very little about the DRZ electrical system, but is there a main line that runs the ignition off power to the speedo cluster that could be switched? I'd much rather not have a clock if it meant not having to worry about charging the battery every two weeks if I don't ride. [yeah, I know, get a tender]

Seems like if that one power wire could be switched on/off it would eliminate at least a good amount of the draw that makes our batteries go dead so quickly.

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red ... 'always on' feed

Thanks, I may just have to hack into the wiring. I wonder if anyone here has done this and had any good results?

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Is there a reason you won't spend $19.98 for a battery tender to save the hassle of a drained battery? To me it was a no brainer after what I had found out and read about on this forum. I own a Battery Tender Jr. that I bought for the DRZ when I bought my battery after the first one failed. I then bought a Black & Decker Battery Tender at WAL-MART for less than $20.00 for another motorcycle.

It only takes a few seconds to plug it in when you are done riding and the same when you are getting ready to ride.

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Well, it will reduce the draw when the bike is off. There is still the draw of the RR. I suppose you could unplug it easily enough to eliminate that too.

Another choice would be to put a switch on the Red wire at the source. This would eliminate all draw while the bike is off. This point would be at the battery box, just after the fuse. If you do this, use 14 (or larger, ie 12) gauge wire and a 20 (or larger, 25) amp switch.

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Is there a reason you won't spend $19.98 for a battery tender to save the hassle of a drained battery?

Because its a band aid to fix a factory flaw. It rather annoys me that they designed it this way, knowing how small the battery is and how easily it would drain it.

Add to that that I'd have to either run an extension cord around the garage or get off my lazy arse and run a new wire over to that corner of the garage and install a new outlet. [You bought any romex lately, stuff has gone through the roof]

I miss the good old days. We have an old (79 Ford) farm truck that hadn't been started in a few years. We wanted to move some limbs that came down during an ice storm, so I grabbed the jumper hootchie knowing it wasn't going to start. Got in, and noticed the dome light came on. Turned the key and it rolled right over and fired up.

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Yes, I have bought wiring lately. But, I also wired my garage, so there are outlets every 6 feet and are on different circuits so I can do multiple things. If you don't want the instrument cluster working as designed, disconnect it.

I have a 1987 Kawasaki that has a battery draw from the radio that causes the same problem. I also have it on a battery tender. To me the tenders are a simple fix, and the tenders let me use the bikes as they were meant to be used. Sometimes when I had my DRZ, I would only ride it a few miles to work and back, and figured that it was never getting enough run time to charge properly anyway.

Do as you wish. The battery tender is a very simple and cheap solution in my mind.

So, did you not put in the MCCT, because it was a factory flaw and the ACCT should work just perfectly after the third or fourth time Suzuki thinks they fixed it.

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this is a great thread.i'm having the exact problems but when i charge the battery then let it sit for a couple of days its dead.put it on a trickle charger but i am now going to get a new battery and a battery tender

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With seven bikes, I've got several battery tenders scattered around the garages and use them regularly. But this DRZ is the first bike I've owned where a ride every week or two wasn't sufficient to keep the battery charged.

- Mark

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Your draw from the RR is the same as mine and is within the Suzuki spec. (Oddly enought Suzuki has the same spec for E and S bikes) I do not know what is common for the S. I have been asking that question for years but this is the 1st post with actual numbers I have seen.

As for the battery, keep in mind that a 7 amp hr battery does not have 7 useable amp hrs. Only about the 1st 1/3 is useable. So the battery is going to look dead after draining 2 to 3 amp hrs. And that is assuming you are starting from a fully charged battery which most are not. I think your analysis is correct. Short rides and long sits make for low battery. I would do a full check out of the charging system and determine what voltage your maintenance charger is keeping the battery at.

Thanks for the data.

Even if the battery has only 2 amp-hours useable, it still should be good for nearly two months at my 1.7 mA static draw rate. There is some self-discharge to contend with too, but this is pretty low for AGM batteries, reported to be 1%-3% a month.

Bottom line is that I probably have something else going on rather than just this slightly-higher-than-spec self-discharge problem. Either a bad battery (I'm no my 2nd one in 18-months), a marginal charging system, or perhaps I'm just too optimstic that my shorter rides are getting the battery back up to snuff after a week or two sit. Maybe a combo of all these factors.

- Mark

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With seven bikes, I've got several battery tenders scattered around the garages and use them regularly. But this DRZ is the first bike I've owned where a ride every week or two wasn't sufficient to keep the battery charged.

- Mark

If I didn't ride extended periods without having to restart the bike, the battery tender showed it needed to be charged. I went for 30 minute ride and it was fine, but less than that always showed it need to be charged. If a crash in the dirt happened multiple times, or I stalled or whatever and had to restart multiple times, it needed to be charged, unless I rode for 30 minutes or more without having to restart. This is just how it worked for me. Others have said in the past that once they rode for 10 or more minutes they were OK.

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The problem is that you are assuming that the battery is fully charged after a ride. the problem is that Noble pointed out that the voltage is too low for a full charge, so unless you do the "free power" mod, you need the tender.

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