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Beadlock alternative

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ive heard some things around the SUMO community about people using sheetmetal screws through the rim into the bead of the tire instead of a true rim-lock. just wondering if anyone has tried it or not?

Chris

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Sorry don't come in here much.

Yes that is what they did before rim locks or so I am told, no have not done it. More than a few well respected people have told me it works - but did not get into details as to "how well" it works compared to rim locks.

Short sheet metal screws on the outside of the rim near the lip screwed through the rim so the point sticks inside the rim a bit so the tire grabs when inflated....

The screws can be placed opposite each other - 2 or 4 (or more?) on each side. It would certainly be different changing a tire that way, and the balancing the rim lock issue with another rim lock or weights would also go away.

If you do it would much appreciate feedback as to how well it works for you.

If there is a flat at higher speeds would the tire come off the rim sooner than with rim lock(s)?

.

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i think i may try it.... i just mounted my new Pirelli Sport demon yesterday but couldnt get the beads to seat. this weekend im gonna giver another try and use some screws. trying to avoid the rim lock for a couple reasons. balancing and unsprung mass.

-chris

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Used sheet metal screws for years, many moons ago, on every off road bike I owned that did not have bead locks. Never had a problem. The trick for me was choosing the correct size screw, made from stainless, and size the hole in the rim so that the screw will tighten up inside the rim and not the tire.

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wayne so how far do you recommend the screw protrude thru the rimwall?

what diamter did you typically use? and how many screws did you use?

any info is appreciated

Chris

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my 91 650 doesn`t even have a hole in the rim for a bead lock.i`ve never had any problems not running one.then again i don`t ride the 650 as hard as i ride my rmz450.

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wayne so how far do you recommend the screw protrude thru the rimwall?

what diamter did you typically use? and how many screws did you use?

any info is appreciated

Chris

Chris,

IIRC a #12 or #14 screw size was what we used. We had a big box that my dad had purchased when he was a young man in the 1960's. The screw was long enough to protrude ~1/2 way through the bead, just barely touching the metal bead wire, if at all. We would run 3-4 screws per side. The main thing I remember was sizing the screw hole so that the screw would tighten in the rim. I do recall splitting a rim once because the screw hole was too small so be careful. I would think that with an aluminum rim a thread cutting screw might work well. If you've got access to a motorcycle junk yard then try picking up an old aluminum rim to play around with.

All of my off-road race bikes run rimlocks. I don't run rimlocks on my DR650 but I rarely drop tire pressure below 18psi. I've yet to have a tire spin on the rim. I wonder if most people who experience this problem are running very low pressure, say less than 12psi.

Good luck,

Wayne

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I've seen several bikes equiped as you describe at off road events as well. I talked to a couple guys and both said it completely prevented spinning the tire on the rim, even at super low pressures.

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I use this method back in the 70's. Then when rim locks came about I forgot all about the screws. I have RL's on my DR, just used 1 lock and counter weights. Had a flat and ran it for 32 miles. 5 in the mud, up hills, rocks etc.. and the rest on the road. Valve stem still in the correct position tire didn't slip a bit. Tire still on rim. Rim not bent a bit.

Don't know if screws would of survived that abuse.

No balance issue at all on the interstate with the counter weights.

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I can't remember which manufacturer did this although i've seen the inside perimeter edge of rim with machined lines w/ a edge like it was done with a file. Don't remember how it worked although seems like it would help and your not drilling your rim. The lines were approx. 1/8" apart & around 3/8" long on slight angle.

Motoretro

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I can't remember which manufacturer did this although i've seen the inside perimeter edge of rim with machined lines w/ a edge like it was done with a file. Don't remember how it worked although seems like it would help and your not drilling your rim. The lines were approx. 1/8" apart & around 3/8" long on slight angle.

Motoretro

Wow - thats a really good idea. Manufacturers making the rims putting ridges, etc on the inside of the rim to prevent tire slippage.

I am sure there is a reason why it is not normally done - tough to manufacture? Hard to change tire?

.

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