Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

TireCross - Share Techniques & Pics

Recommended Posts

Does anyone out there have a good technique for hopping over tires.

After completing 10 passes over these tires successfully (5 laps) I want to see what everyone else does? and how to keep up speed over these?

HuskyTTirecrossGlenHelenSRAGP.jpg

HuskyTtireCrossGlenHelen2.jpg

HuskyTTirecrossGlenHelenSRAGP3.jpg

I witnessed numerous bad crashes today, especially after two or three laps.... everything from simply laying bikes over to wild out of control rocket launches.... for me it is all about momentum but would like to improve speed

Any thoughts out there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What event was this at?

After watching the last man standing and the enduro at Ersberg (sp?) I wondered how guys get over those things so quickly. I used to do enduros growing up and can't imagine the technique is too different then crossing large logs but I never had to cross logs that big!

I think the trials guys would get over those things the quickest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What event was this at?

After watching the last man standing and the enduro at Ersberg (sp?) I wondered how guys get over those things so quickly. I used to do enduros growing up and can't imagine the technique is too different then crossing large logs but I never had to cross logs that big!

I think the trials guys would get over those things the quickest.

This was at the Glen Helen SRA GP - two tire crossings spaced 30 feet apart immediatley followed by a sharp left turn and then up and over 5 logs followed by a small table.

I have my own technique but want to improve speed over. Some of the experts were crossing them like they weren't even there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In all seriousness with the nice run up they had on those i would do it just like you are doing it, roll up and over in one nice motion. Your not going to make up any time here so no need to try anything fancy that will just end up with you on the ground. We had a race here with a log section with many logs placed at different angles. Before my race i went and watched the carnage of the AM class. Funny stuff as these guys were all over the ground trying to go fast. when my class went out there no one was on the ground because we knew not to try and make time through there as at best you might make up a second or two. Obstacles like this are better just taken smooth and slow because no time will be gained here and lots of time will be lost lopping it out or tossing it on the far side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In all seriousness with the nice run up they had on those i would do it just like you are doing it, roll up and over in one nice motion. Your not going to make up any time here so no need to try anything fancy that will just end up with you on the ground. We had a race here with a log section with many logs placed at different angles. Before my race i went and watched the carnage of the AM class. Funny stuff as these guys were all over the ground trying to go fast. when my class went out there no one was on the ground because we knew not to try and make time through there as at best you might make up a second or two. Obstacles like this are better just taken smooth and slow because no time will be gained here and lots of time will be lost lopping it out or tossing it on the far side.

Excellent reply and advice. Remember, It's not how fast you can go.........it's how long you can go fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In all seriousness with the nice run up they had on those i would do it just like you are doing it, roll up and over in one nice motion. Your not going to make up any time here so no need to try anything fancy that will just end up with you on the ground. We had a race here with a log section with many logs placed at different angles. Before my race i went and watched the carnage of the AM class. Funny stuff as these guys were all over the ground trying to go fast. when my class went out there no one was on the ground because we knew not to try and make time through there as at best you might make up a second or two. Obstacles like this are better just taken smooth and slow because no time will be gained here and lots of time will be lost lopping it out or tossing it on the far side.

Thanks Ride... that is exactly what I did and went 10 for 10 with no problems..... what I would like to work up to is seeing the experts rollup at high speed to the face , brake 10 ft out and then gracefully roll over in one fluid motion while staying on the pegs for the duration of both sets of tires . I guess it just comes with more practice and balance of bodywieght.

A lot of guys went down here and the flagger would send them the alternate easy route anyway , costing them additional time. The rule for the day was that if you rode the tires you had to complete both tires and the 5 logs, otherwise if you didn't make it , you had to go the alternate route anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When in doubt! Go around!

LOL ...... a lot of people chose your option, especially when they started getting tired or hurt!

Going around is making the easy choice but does nothing to improve skills.

Going around option also adds an extra 500 yards of turns /twists and passing through a infield track tunnel at slow speed adding considerable time to your lap

Only an estimate on my part but I think it saved 25 - 30 seconds to go over the tires and logs X 5 laps = 2 1/2 minutes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Excellent reply and advice. Remember, It's not how fast you can go.........it's how long you can go fast.

Point taken and agreed upon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obstacles like that are what separate the men from the boys. Those guys on quads are just watching:prof:

What event was this at?

After watching the last man standing and the enduro at Ersberg (sp?) I wondered how guys get over those things so quickly. I used to do enduros growing up and can't imagine the technique is too different then crossing large logs but I never had to cross logs that big!

I think the trials guys would get over those things the quickest.

No offense, but it says the name right in the first picture^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In all seriousness with the nice run up they had on those i would do it just like you are doing it, roll up and over in one nice motion. Your not going to make up any time here so no need to try anything fancy that will just end up with you on the ground. We had a race here with a log section with many logs placed at different angles. Before my race i went and watched the carnage of the AM class. Funny stuff as these guys were all over the ground trying to go fast. when my class went out there no one was on the ground because we knew not to try and make time through there as at best you might make up a second or two. Obstacles like this are better just taken smooth and slow because no time will be gained here and lots of time will be lost lopping it out or tossing it on the far side.

I totally agree...Not a bunch of gain to be had there, just a bunch of ouch...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Obstacles like that are what separate the men from the boys. Those guys on quads are just watching:prof:

You're right, it was the "Spectator Center" of the day. Everyone waiting to see the big spills!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

those things with four wheels seem to make great portable seats. comfortable too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This past GNCC had Tires that size set up as a triple jump. My brother didn't quite make it on the 5th lap and put on a show for the 2000 plus watching. scared the hell out of me. They had a little more dirt on the lip for take off.

http://www.photoreflect.com/scripts/prsm.dll?eventthumbs?event=03VE00RS06&b=0&t=-1&start=0&password=

Check big David Knight out, no. 101 in the middle of the page.Wattsy bottom left.Second page bottom left, Green kid on husky.He opted to go around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright I am going to add my two cents here. I used to do a little trials and have had a little experience with them at a indoor trial event. You don't want to hit them too fast but try to pick a point about two thirds of the height of the tire or log. Then you want to wheelie and drive your front tire into the tire as this will give the bike lift (about 2/3 of the obstacle) to get your skid plate not to hit the tire as this will stop your movement over. Your body I think should be center or a little back. Once your front tire hits the tire you want to start shifting your weight back and trying to get your rear wheel to make contact and not bounce off. In trials you are supposed to only use enought throttle to make it to the top, in other words not bonzai it. It is sort of the same as when you hit a large log. You can practice hitting a log and get the hang of hitting the front tire on it and trying to get the rear tire to come up as you cross over. On the trip down it really depends on how smoothe it is if you can roll it or have to get traction at top and wheelie. Again I am no expert on this but if you go to Ryan Youngs web site there is a lot of good videos there at Trials Training Center. It is also a lot harder to do on a four stroke woods bike than a two stroke. You have that whole stall fear going on.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's all about commitment and visualization. Don't even think for one second that it is going to go wrong or it usually will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's all about commitment and visualization. Don't even think for one second that it is going to go wrong or it usually will.

I agree with you... I told myself that everytime I approached it... when I was in the Marines they taught us that " it is only in your mind and if you don't mind , it don't matter" ..... with that thought in mind I attacked it each and every time and never once thought that I wasn't going to make it..... went 10 for 10.

I applied the same philosphy here and it worked well. Didn't hurt that my wife, 6 year old daughter and 3 year old son and family and freinds were all in the bleachers screaming and cheering me on.

It would suck to blow it but it would really suck to blow it in front of the ones you love! The ribbing would be merciless and last for years!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alright I am going to add my two cents here. I used to do a little trials and have had a little experience with them at a indoor trial event. You don't want to hit them too fast but try to pick a point about two thirds of the height of the tire or log. Then you want to wheelie and drive your front tire into the tire as this will give the bike lift (about 2/3 of the obstacle) to get your skid plate not to hit the tire as this will stop your movement over. Your body I think should be center or a little back. Once your front tire hits the tire you want to start shifting your weight back and trying to get your rear wheel to make contact and not bounce off. In trials you are supposed to only use enought throttle to make it to the top, in other words not bonzai it. It is sort of the same as when you hit a large log. You can practice hitting a log and get the hang of hitting the front tire on it and trying to get the rear tire to come up as you cross over. On the trip down it really depends on how smoothe it is if you can roll it or have to get traction at top and wheelie. Again I am no expert on this but if you go to Ryan Youngs web site there is a lot of good videos there at Trials Training Center. It is also a lot harder to do on a four stroke woods bike than a two stroke. You have that whole stall fear going on.

First off , thank you for offering up a good educational reply. If you, or anyone have more thoughts on this developed skill , I would appreciate them. As per my previous post, a lot of the Expert? ( or at least the guys that could do this easily) guys would come into this fast , brake and roll over in one fluid motion while staying on the pegs. A lot of them also planted their legs in much the same manner as the pictures of me indicate. A lot of them would stall coming over the first set and roll with a dead engine into the next set of tires. I stalled my Husky twice but luckily after the second set of tires.... thank God for Electric Start! Then they would start up and rocket launch over the next set. This is where thier mind got the better of them and made them do stupid stuff . Saw one guy do a back flip and land with his body on top of another bike that had gone down... probably got a foot peg in a kidney.....with his bike landing on the far side of teh second set of tires.... in any case, his race was over for the day. If that dude ever reads this post I hope he is ok and has recovered... it was one hell of a show at his expense!

While I didn't find this difficult, I definitely want to work on this to where I am using less of a skidplate hopping technique and more of a fluid rolling motion.

Would pivot pegs be beneficial or payoff here?

I might mention that as the only Husky at the track that day, my bike got a lot of interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×