Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

steering dampner suggestions

Recommended Posts

hello im in the market for a steering dampner and was hoping I could get some suggestions. First off, what brand? I'm thinking scotts but open to hearing your pro's and con's on this and other brands. Second, where do you suggest mounting? Sub mount for saftey, but then I'd have to ride fat bars right? I personaly prefer 7/8th bars and arent to worried about the saftey issues of having it above. What about the tripple clamp too? Do I need it with the sub mount or above or is it simply just an accessory?

Thanks for any help,

Small_and_fast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own a GPR and have been very happy with the product and customer service. I like the big dial on the GPR for adjusting it on the fly. Mounting kind of depends on the bike you have. Do you have removable bar mounts?

There is a lot of info on this topic, you might want to do a search.

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Id go for Scotts. Or rather, I went with Scotts. Thier customer service is waidely known as the best in the industry for anything, and thier product matches. If you arent worried about saftey, then go for the top mount, probably a bolt-on kit if you can't get your hands on a welder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about your riding style, and/or what kind of terrain...etc...etc?!

I chose an RTT for a few reasons;

- remote damping adjuster

- numbers on main adjuster knob

- clean and simple, yet safe and not a chin lacerator.

GPR are nice, and located 20min from my house.

And they too use a system that allows for you to see the adjuster at speed (during a race) so you know where your settings are. They also have the V3 with remote adjuster but it's too large for my liking.

SCOTTs... nice as well, but I don't like the small adjuster. You can buy a larger plastic adjuster... but it again won't have any markings showing your setting. You'll have to mark it yourself. Still a great damper.

You need to ask what's more important to YOU as they all are great units. You not worrying about safety and that chin of yours... is something concerning. Under the bars is the only way to go in my opinion, with a pad if you can. I've seen too many flat landings or g-outs where someone has splintered the chin bone on the sharp edges of a damper. Not good.

Good luck to ya!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Under the bars is the only way to go in my opinion, with a pad if you can. I've seen too many flat landings or g-outs where someone has splintered the chin bone on the sharp edges of a damper.

so it's a safety thing? lol, i figured it was just to keep the post shorter and to get the bars higher for us normal-sized people. but i stand on the pegs when i hit a g-out. i can't imagine smacking my chin into the bars. sheesh, i'd break the gps on my 4-stroke.

anyway, i think most people are happiest with the scotts. i personally have a gpr on one bike and i like it just fine, but i only really use it for dezert racing. i don't see the value in dampers for woods riding, unless you're just covering up poor suspension setup or valving.

mw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
so it's a safety thing? lol, i figured it was just to keep the post shorter and to get the bars higher for us normal-sized people. but i stand on the pegs when i hit a g-out. i can't imagine smacking my chin into the bars. sheesh, i'd break the gps on my 4-stroke.

anyway, i think most people are happiest with the scotts. i personally have a gpr on one bike and i like it just fine, but i only really use it for dezert racing. i don't see the value in dampers for woods riding, unless you're just covering up poor suspension setup or valving.

mw

Just a few places where I've noticed a damper comes in very handy in the woods:

Ever catch a bark buster on a tree without a damper?

On a steep downhill front tire drops into an angled cross rut: without damper front wheel slams to lock.... With damper front wheel tracks straight with no over-the-bars get-off.

I don't know how many times I've caught something with the front tire where the bars have been kicked to one side or the other causing an unintended dismount.

Bike is less tiring to ride through the rocky sections.

Bike is less tiring to ride through the deep mud and water sections.

Bike is less tiring over the long root infested sections.

Is a damper needed? Nope! Does it make woods riding a little easier and a little safer? Yep!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just a few places where I've noticed a damper comes in very handy in the woods:

Ever catch a bark buster on a tree without a damper?

On a steep downhill front tire drops into an angled cross rut: without damper front wheel slams to lock..

i have knocked my bark buster on a tree w/o a damper. no real problem, but i generally try to avoid running into trees, even tho they put alot of them into races.

never had the problem with the front wheel slamming to lock for any reason either, but maybe i just ride slow. i've ridden the idaho city qualifier the last 3 years, once with a damper and twice without. i can't tell a difference in speed or fatigue, but my suspension on my 250sx works pretty well in the woods.

but hey, everyone is different. if it makes you feel better, by all means, go ahead and keep using it. i don't take the one i have off for woods riding, but i don't miss it when it's being serviced or when i ride my other bike w/o a damper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Ohlins/scott has the most adjustment hi/lo speed and sweep adjustment. You could also choose betwin if you want/don`t dampening back to center.. i use ohlins

image007.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the Ohlins/scott has the most adjustment hi/lo speed and sweep adjustment. You could also choose betwin if you want/don`t dampening back to center.. i use ohlins

image007.jpg

I agree you get thee most adjustment out of a SCOTTs... but not too many people out there even know this (hi/low...etc) nor do they ever adjust it. "Bolt it on and go" is the majority of users buying dampers (IMHO).

And I can't imagine coming down against that thing.... YEEEOOOW!!

Here's mine (since we're sharing) ~ without the padding

attachment.php?attachmentid=2260&d=1170266165

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have run Scotts up till this year. They have more adjustment than you will even need, or want. I never had an issues with the damper, very solid product. However this year I went with an Emig Racing Damper. So far it has exceded all of my expectations. Fit was excelent, easy to adjust, and the people at Emig are great to deal with and have good customer service.

http://emigracing.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you guys feel it's worth $350 to do this mod? (Didn't mean to hi-jack, just adding another good factor.)

I use the GPR and love it. After you get used to it, you take it for advantage. I switched bikes with my budy last weekend for a while. After like 15 minutes I was like "omg this handles like crap" and had to switch back. I've had a budy smack his helmet buckle into his neck. So having a sub mount was something that was important to me.

-fu

here my set up.

Cal_City006-full.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you guys feel it's worth $350 to do this mod? (Didn't mean to hi-jack, just adding another good factor.)

some people claim they wouldn't ride without one. so i guess to them it's worth it.

for me it's not worth it for trailriding or enduro, but for dezert racing it's worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree you get thee most adjustment out of a SCOTTs... but not too many people out there even know this (hi/low...etc) nor do they ever adjust it. "Bolt it on and go" is the majority of users buying dampers (IMHO).

And I can't imagine coming down against that thing.... YEEEOOOW!!

The settings are easy to adjust on the fly with the scotss. You turn it clockwise if you want more dampening, and counter clockwise if you want less. Im in the desert, and usually end up at full hard without noticing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The settings are easy to adjust on the fly with the scotss. You turn it clockwise if you want more dampening, and counter clockwise if you want less. Im in the desert, and usually end up at full hard without noticing.

I think ya missed the point. :applause: Do you know you have a "high and low speed" adjustment other than the KNOB on the face of the unit?!

:eek:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went with the scott also and it is very easy to adjust on the fly. Great product would not ride with out one. This dampner will go on every bike i own from now on. Here is my set up.

450X020.jpg

450X019.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think ya missed the point. :applause: Do you know you have a "high and low speed" adjustment other than the KNOB on the face of the unit?!

:eek:

I know all about that, but the high is more of a set how you want one and dont worry about it until your riding or terrain drastically changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you guys feel it's worth $350 to do this mod? (Didn't mean to hi-jack, just adding another good factor.)

It depends on the bike your riding, the terrain, and how well your bike is set up for that terrain. I have not used a damper the last two years on a KX250F but as soon as I rode my KX250 this year I knew it needed it. basically if you feel like your front end is twitchy then work on suspension setup, and if it never gets better then you probally need a damper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is another thread on steering dampners at:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=483671

I fitted a large hose clamp on my GPR V2’s knob for fast-speed on-the-fly adjustments. I bent the remaining clamp strip into a lever that makes the knob “Q” shaped. The V2 is under the bars and limits the hose clamp to a little more than half of the dial’s rotation. Also, I learned to ensure the bottom of the hose clamp did not touch the stabilizer at installation after seeing this could scratched the unit. I would not have bought a GPR had I know they also dampen to center, which is bad.

I have used the RTT on an XR650R for about five long rides. It has a little play at center, and always leaks, despite numerous RTT seal replacements, the last being a year ago and reportedly made of new urethane something or other. Its three thumb settings are set up perfect for switching between riding tight singletrack (soft), normal (medium), and very steep rock downhills (hard). http://www.rttmotorsports.com/honda_xr_650_2001.htm

I have had an old WER on an XR650R for four years and it limits my right-left steering from making it all the way over to the right lock, and this warps and stresses the stabilizer body. This problem “wears the WER” faster and I have had to get it overhauled. WER has done a great job relative to the weight, mounting location, and cost; it has proven itself to me in all types of terrain, although WER used heavier oil after they overhauled it because it was too soft for me when riding Baja sand whoops. Now that the mounting brackets are larger and U-shaped, WER claims this would not happen anymore, which suggests I mounted the older smaller bracket on a wrong location on the frame. Adjusting it requires coming to a complete stop. Maybe epoxy and a quarter would help increase the knob size, for half-speed on-the-fly adjustments.

I got a Scotts today because I hear only good things about it, will not mess with my WR250f’s headlight, and wanted to give it a good shot. I figured out that the "high speed" nob is just that, it allows for a second "free-to-center" dampening level to kick in. The sweep is also adjustable, so my take is that the Scotts can be made to perform virtually like any other dampner. Now if Scotts only made a lightweight version that dropped into the steering tube with drilled holes on the frame for the adjustment knobs, that could be adjusted by cable at the handlebar grips, the competition would have to follow, or go out of business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×