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Diesel versus Gasoline Prices.

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On the west coast, we are seeing somewhat stable diesel fuel prices with gasoline prices rising. It's been a long time since I have seen diesel at the price of regular gas - and the ultra low sulfur diesel rollout is complete too. Maybe we'll get back into the cycle where diesel drops below regular gas in the summer again...

I looked on the government website that tracks prices and other markets have diesel spiking up a little too...

http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/info_glance/petroleum.html

I was just checking it out because I am taking a trip easter vacation and was looking at which rig would be best to drive...

jeff

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In comercial chemicals, the process for chlorine/caustic production produces a fixed ratio of the two products from the one production line. When demand for chlorine goes up, caustic becomes an overstocked byproduct and the price falls; when chlorine demand goes down demand for caustic drives manufacturing and the price shoots up. How this relates to the thread topic I leave to you.

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I'm in NY and it's not common to find Diesel under the price of regular. It's generally between regular and special. Some highway rest stops are cheaper, but that's just the markup is not as high.

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For a while (long time actually) diesel wasn't tax to the full extent that the other gas was taxed at. When you saw diesel jump was when they (the government) put all the road tax they could on diesel to pay for road maintenance and other expenses associated with trucks. For a long time that tax wasn't applied because they wanted truckers to be competitive in the transportation business. If you notice when you fill up at a Flying J the two are separate, commercial trucks and everyone else. They still get a little bit of a break over us but not much. Anyone who has a diesel for commuting got caught up in the mess and we are all paying through the nose. Here in Washington truckers will only fill their tanks with enough diesel to make it out of the state because the price is so high.

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For a while (long time actually) diesel wasn't tax to the full extent that the other gas was taxed at. When you saw diesel jump was when they (the government) put all the road tax they could on diesel to pay for road maintenance and other expenses associated with trucks. For a long time that tax wasn't applied because they wanted truckers to be competitive in the transportation business. If you notice when you fill up at a Flying J the two are separate, commercial trucks and everyone else. They still get a little bit of a break over us but not much. Anyone who has a diesel for commuting got caught up in the mess and we are all paying through the nose. Here in Washington truckers will only fill their tanks with enough diesel to make it out of the state because the price is so high.

do tell, where did you aquire this bit of (mis)information?

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For a while (long time actually) diesel wasn't tax to the full extent that the other gas was taxed at. When you saw diesel jump was when they (the government) put all the road tax they could on diesel to pay for road maintenance and other expenses associated with trucks. For a long time that tax wasn't applied because they wanted truckers to be competitive in the transportation business. If you notice when you fill up at a Flying J the two are separate, commercial trucks and everyone else. They still get a little bit of a break over us but not much. Anyone who has a diesel for commuting got caught up in the mess and we are all paying through the nose. Here in Washington truckers will only fill their tanks with enough diesel to make it out of the state because the price is so high.

The price difference you are seeing at Flying J is due to the fact that Flying J illegally charges a different price for cash or credit on the commercial side, and the same price for either on the personal use side.

http://www.iftach.org/taxmatrix2/ratetable.php

Truckers buy the bare minimum fuel in WA state due to the fact that WA has some of the highest fuel taxes in the country (.34 per gallon), but sometimes in the end, it is cheaper to purchase WA state fuel when factoring in the IFTA tax assessment. (pump price-tax per gallon=actual fuel price)

OR charges no tax at the pump, but charges a mileage charge of nearly .14/mile

IDK where you get your taxation increase info, but if you do your research on tax of gas vs diesel, you will find that diesel is taxed usually at a much higher rate per gallon than gas.

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The price difference you are seeing at Flying J is due to the fact that Flying J illegally charges a different price for cash or credit on the commercial side, and the same price for either on the personal use side.

http://www.iftach.org/taxmatrix2/ratetable.php

Didn't realize that was illegal, there are serval stations that give "cash" discounts but who carries cash anymore.

I think Washington is up to .39 now and still on the rise with our wonderful govenor.

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The price difference you are seeing at Flying J is due to the fact that Flying J illegally charges a different price for cash or credit on the commercial side, and the same price for either on the personal use side.

This of course brings up the argument of why should cash paying customers subsidize credit cards?

The laws concerning this are of benefit to the banks, not the consumer that wishes to use cash.

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Didn't realize that was illegal, there are serval stations that give "cash" discounts but who carries cash anymore.

I think Washington is up to .39 now and still on the rise with our wonderful govenor.

This of course brings up the argument of why should cash paying customers subsidize credit cards?

The laws concerning this are of benefit to the banks, not the consumer that wishes to use cash.

Take the time to read your cardholders agreement, it states in it "no merchant shall charge more for goods or services when this card is used vs cash"

(not the exact wording, but the same intent)

What Flying J and Pilot truck stops are doing is trying to stick it to those who use credit cards for purchasing fuel, as Visa and other CC companies charge a portion of the total sale as a fee (sometimes up to 5%), and they are passing that fee on to the consumer-not allowed. I always ask the manager at stations that practice this "How much more for a doughnut or pop if I pay by CC?" The don't understand the point I am making. I don't do business with people at all costs.

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Take the time to read your cardholders agreement, it states in it "no merchant shall charge more for goods or services when this card is used vs cash"

(not the exact wording, but the same intent)

Making my point exactly. Retailers raise their prices to all because of credit card fees.

PS: I'm a retailer, I know this first hand.

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