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Look At My Tire Changer & Cleaning Rims, Corrosion?

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I bought the tire changer and motorcycle adapter from Harbor Freight back when they went on sale for $40 each. Finally got around to setting it up. I didn't want to bolt it to the floor but needed a sturdy base.

I ended up going to the hardware store and bought a 3/4" sheet of MDF that I had them cut two sections out of it to 3' x 3'. Also bought a 12' long 2" x 4" that I had them cut two sections 36" and another two at 29 1/4". Doubled the MDF boards up and laid the 2" x 4" flat around the perimeter. Put some screws through it and bolted the tire machine down. I was going to plati-dip the wheel clamps but decided to cut up some old bicycle tubes instead.

Here it is, excuse the mess, I have to share the garage:

TireMachine01.jpg

TireMachine02.jpg

So, this was the first moto tire I've changed. The bead breaker worked nice. I used a 4" x 4" block to raise the other side of the tire to keep the rotor from touching. The sprocket side touched a bit anyways. Getting that first bite to bring the bead up over the rim was a b*tch. I used a smaller tire spoon to get the second bite but it was hard to squeeze in there. After it was started it was cake though. I'll have to refine my techniques and it should be quite easy after some practice. I took the tire off with the sprocket on. I took the sprocket off and tried flipping it over but our hubs stick out too much on the sprocket side to lock down to the machine. So it looks like rotor side down only.

Will be putting the new tire on later today, it's warming up in the sun now. I'm installing an ultra heavy-duty tube so that's gonna make things difficult for my first install. Wish me luck in not pinching the tube.

Before I get to that though, look at my rim and tell me if I need to clean this off? I bought these used, 2004 'E' model. I tried scrubbing with a nylon brush and some simple green and even brake cleaner but it's not coming off. So, do I need to worry about this gunk, and if so how would you clean it off?

Rim_Gunk.jpg

And here's the rim lock after trying to clean it up:

RimLock_Gunk.jpg

I dunno, I think they will be alright. I can always get new rim hoops and locks later down the road if they rot out or crack. You think? I am going to go over the spoke nipples again.

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Forgot to say, that rod that goes down through the hub, it comes with a smaller diameter one too. I'm going to use that and some bearings to make a balancer I can set between two jack stands. Haven't decided the specifics, if anyone wants to throw me some ideas.

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I'm installing an ultra heavy-duty tube so that's gonna make things difficult for my first install. Wish me luck in not pinching the tube.

If you are careful I wouldn't worry about pinching an Ultra Heavy Duty Tube. I think you have less of a chance of pinching that tube versus a standard tube. The UHD will hold its shape much better. Once I have the tube in the tire I give it 1 psi or so just so it takes shape, then take the stem back out.

Also...a C-clamp works great for breaking the bead.

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I have the same setup but didn't mount it to the floor for the same reason. Looks like you have a very good solution. I'll have to copy you :applause:.

For a balancer, I got a Marc Parnes balancer and use 2 jackstands. I don't normally balance dirtbike wheels but I got it for my R6. There's also a NoMar bar that takes the tire off w/o damaging the wheel.

For dirtbike tires, I just use 3 spoons. There's a great video on Transworld MX website on how to change tires from a Bridgestone mechanic.

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For cleaning the rim, try a scotchbrite or 600 grit sand paper.

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I've got the same setup. I use an old tire under the wheel when using the bead breaker. I took off the top arm of the changer, just get's in the way. The motard and s tires are very easy to spoon off versus using the center rod and bar they provide. Insert some small wood blocks between the tire and rim on the opposite side of the tire you are unmounting (both top and bottom). This will push the beads into the valley of the rim and make the initial removal and final install a breeze.

I bought a balancer on ebay. It has different size cones, a rod, and 2 carriers with 2 bearings each that the rod sits on. Very sensitive to movement. Works great for balancing.

WGW

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Thanks for all the tips. Imma try a scotchbrite pad on 'em but if I don't get anywhere I don't think I'm going to put in much more effort. I'll try the wood blocks too as I read in the TT tech article that it is important to keep pushing the bead into the valley as you work. And I watched the Transworld MX thing a few times before starting!

The base is fairly heavy and pretty sturdy while working the tire. I've seen the NoMar bar but I'm going to try and work with the one it came with and the tire spoons, at least for now. I have some rim protectors. Hopefully they protect my SM wheels OK, which are next up.

I'll have to look over some of the balancers you guys have and see if I want to put something together or buy one.

WGW, I don't believe I've asked you where abouts you are in MO?

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Spoons are good for dirt wheels but for SM wheels, you'll scratch or dent them if you use the bar the tire changer came with. I tried on my friend's R6 and as careful as I was with rim protectors and duct taped parts that touch the rim, I still had a few scratches. He didn't mind too much since I did it for free but I wasn't too happy about it. I used the NoMar bar on my wheels and it was easier and didn't scratch my wheels.

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WGW, I don't believe I've asked you where abouts you are in MO?

Lee's Summit, it's in the metro Kansas City area.

WGW

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I got one of those units too. Haven't mounted it or used it yet. Is that MDF a 3/4 sheet of plywood?

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Put a stainless steel wire wheel in your die grinder or elect drill and take that corrosion off. It's rough and hampers demount & install of tire. Alumibrite and alodine after and it will slow down corrosion....alumibrite is phosphoric acid/water diluted etching solution & alodine corrosion inhibitor. Follow directions on containers, usually available at auto paint stores, airports and the like. Scotchbrite wheels in die grinder work great also...

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OK, where to begin?

Well, first off, the bicycle inner tubes didn't hold up. They ripped where the jaw holds the wheel. Might of been from spinning it around. I think I'll cut up the old standard MX tube and see if it holds up better. If not I may try to plasti-dip them, maybe even mix in some grit for non-skid. I need to test whatever before I put my SM wheels on there or at least try to be really gentle with it. I manhandled the dirt wheel.

The scotchbrite pad didn't make a dent in the corrosion stuff by hand. Next time I'm going to try my mini die grinder with the scotchbrite pads or I'll buy a wire wheel too if it needs more. Thanks for the tips camster, I'll get the chemicals and do it right next time. I'm hoping that's what was giving me such a hard time!

And installing the tire, had a few hangups. The 4Strokes.com tire changer review shows using the hook-end of the bar to seat the bottom bead. I tried that, could get maybe 2/3s of it on. I tried just pushing the tire over the rim like shown in the TWMX video. It just didn't want to fall in place easy like the video shows. The TT tech article said to put the bottom bead on first and then install the rim lock. So I took the rim lock out and wouldn't you know it, the bottom bead slid over like butter. Then came the total PITA of putting the rim lock back in there and under the rim band. Next time I'm going to try again with the rim lock already in place like the video shows.

Next the tube, I had a small rubbermaid tub knockoff that I filled with three econo-sized bottles of the cheap brand baby powder. Got the tube coated evenly and slid that big sucker in the tire no problem. The valve stem wasn't as easy as ol' Dougy made it look but it only took a minute to find the hole. And you're right Sundog, I didn't worry at all about pinching that monster tube, which I bought from dual-star, but it's just a Bridgestone Ultra Heavy Duty 4mm thick tube. That thing is awesome, don't think I'd run anything else unless it was at a race track. I'd tell anyone to use it for their first tire install.

Installing the top bead, with the bar you're supposed to use the hook end again. I could get it about 2/3s the way again before I gave up on that thing and used my single tire spoon. The top bead was fairly easy. I kept trying to move the beads into the valley as I was working as is stated so important in the tire changing process but it didn't feel to me like it was actually doing anything. With both beads in the rim I took the wheel out of the machine so I could seat the beads. I took it to 30 psi and all looked good so I then took the valve stem core out. With the tire deflated the beads were still seated and I pushed in all around and they didn't move. I put the core back in and aired up to 15 psi.

In conclusion, I don't know if I actually needed the tire changer. One, you can't flip the wheel over, not like I really ever needed to though. Two, I had much better luck with my single tire spoon than I did the big pry bar. At least for installing the tire. The leverage worked good for taking the first bite to get the tire off, but I took over with the tire spoon from there. The bead breaker worked nice, but like Sundog said, there's other simple methods for that. Considering I only paid $80 for it and just a little wheel stand in RM is $99, I don't feel like it was a waste. I'll be changing my car tires with it too.

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dfesmire99, MDF isn't so much like plywood as it is particleboard, but it's stronger and heavier than both. It stands for something like medium density fiberboard. Any hardware store should have it next to the plywood and particleboard.

I could have went 4' x 4', a time or two I got the base to rock but that was when I put all my weight onto the tire trying to get that bottom bead to seat until I tried another technique. It's big enough as it is though.

I'm going to break it down by unbolting the post but leaving the legs on the base, I think. Then lean the base against a wall and the post and arms I'll find room on the rack or lay on top of something else on the floor.

dzejdzej, I don't know, I haven't found her yet, but if you see her, remember I called dibs!

I'm still worried about changing my SM tires, but if this can be read as a sign, I had a dream last night that the new SM tire slid on like butter. Night and day difference from the knobby. LOL, don't think that quite holds true but I hope it is a good sign. I think I'm going to use the spoons only on them, what do you think BobbyC? Will you clarify if you think spoons are OK when you said "Spoons are good for dirt wheels but for SM wheels, you'll scratch or dent them if you use the bar the tire changer came with."?

I'd suggest everyone learn how to change your own tires. I found you really don't need a machine like this. And the first time may be difficult but it can be done, and I only had a tiny scratch on my knuckle after all was said and done. That was from fighting to get the rim lock back in. I have a feeling every tire after this is only going to be easier.... Until a terror-flex, lol!

WGW, I'm just west of you, the old air force base is my stomping grounds, technically Belton though.

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I zip-tied strips of leather on the clamps. When I do my dirt bike tires, I don't clamp them. I just take an old tire and place it on the tire changer and use it as a platform to support the dirt wheel and tire while I spoon it off and on. Now, when you go to mount the supermoto tires, you will probably want to clamp it. I just replaced my wore out originals a couple of weeks ago. Bought the same factory tires. They are "tubeless" tires, but of course we use tubes due to the spokes. Tubeless tires typically have tighter beads which make them a hint more diffcult to spoon off. The clamps will certianly make it eaiser. I used rim protectors while spooning and had no problems with scratching the wheels. Oh yeah, look at buying Motion Pro's Bead Buddy. Just as good as having a third arm. Since you are in the area, when you are ready to do the supermoto tires, look me up. You can bring them over and I'll be happy to show you what works for me.

WGW

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SM tires are different than dirt tires. You WILL scratch your wheels with the HF bar if you get the tire off/on. Tire irons will do the same but you can be careful somewhat. I can't do it and I've changed tons of tires on bikes and cars (not on this thing).

Get the NoMar bar. It's well worth it. Check out their site, they have a video on how to use the bar. For street tires, you really don't need spoons. Hard to explain but easy once you try yourself. It might be that street wheels are softer and easier to scratch or dent. Maybe the SM wheels will hold up better? I'm not sure.

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CsHosi---- Im sending you my wheel since you have all the tools and the stealer wants $350.00 to lace tru and put the rear tire back on...... So you going to help me out or what? hehe

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DRZDUal - where are you? I'm in Northern NJ and much more experienced than CsHosi :applause:

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Thanks for the tips and comments everybody.

WGW, I might just take you up on that. I want to see it done with spoons and I'm still a bit nervous about scratching it myself. I may eventually get a NoMar bar but I've gotta see it with spoons first. I was thinking about the trail-sized bead buddy too.

DRZDual, I haven't even gotten around to lacing a new rim to my MTB wheel yet! It will be my first wheel build!

Here's the new K760 compared to my old D756, it's quite a bit narrower:

TireChange_K760.jpg

I'm going to mate it with a Michelin AC10 front after a few more rides with the D756. I wore the rear down pretty good. It's going to be nice having some traction in the greasy mud I encounter at Deepwater. I'm eager to find out if it will feel any less stable with the narrower tire though.

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wow what size kenda did you get? my kenda was bigger then my 756........

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