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Toyota Tundra and misleading advertizing

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The following is from a member of the Truck Marketing Team..........................

The truth about the Troubled Toyota Tundra that many miss in recent commercial...........

At the Minneapolis Auto Show kick off breakfast on March 8. Two of our Sandy Corp. product trainers did a nice job explaining the Tundra ads. I would guess all of you have seen the stupid ad where the Tundra pulls a trailer up a steep grade (a 'see-saw'), and then barrels down hill and locks the brakes up just before the end of the ramp. Seen it? Yeah you have.

Couple things to keep in mind. The Voice Over at the beginning of the spot says...."It's tough pushing 10,000 lbs up a steep grade". Myth: Toyota would like the audience to believe the trailer is 10,000 lbs. Fact: It's a 5,000 lb truck pulling a 5,000 lb trailer. A little slight of hand? You bet.

Then, on the way down the grade, the camera zooms in on the brakes as the vehicles comes to a screeching halt just prior to the end of ramp. Next time you see the ad....look for the 'mice type'. It indicates the trailer is equipped with electric brakes. Fact....the electric brakes stop the trailer -- not the truck. A little slight of hand? You bet.

And why does Toyota have bigger brake pads? They need them....their truck is heavier, and a gas guzzler. Stopping distance between GM trucks and theirs is virtually identical. And why does Toyota have a 6 speed transmission? To improve their fuel economy....which is still 2 mpg less than GM's.

And don't forget....their big V8 has one axle ratio -- a 4.3. Suck fuel much EXXON loves it? GM trucks offer several axle options to optimize towing and fuel economy. Bottom line: GM TRUCKS ARE BETTER! Spread the word......armed with the truth, we can all make a difference."

WB

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good to know, because i was liking the new tundras. but the new GM trucks look good to.

now I know what I would go for.

thanks for the info.

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Very interesting and good information... However, I'm sure all manufacuters use "slight of hand" in thier advertising. Whether trucks or cars or tires... Just a fact of life.

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And don't forget....their big V8 has one axle ratio -- a 4.3.

They have other ratios, matter which configuration you buy.

Ford had a little video out that compared the new F-150 to the competition...every time it bragged about why it's better it would show parts from other trucks and how they don't match up...but the would leave out one truck or the other when it was convienent. It bagged on the Titan because it had thinner sheetmetal(which it does...) and then talk about how strong the F-150 frame is because it's fully boxed and the other trucks use "C" channel shaped frame rails...They left out the fact that the Titan ALSO has a fully boxed and welded frame.

I'm sure it did the same slight of hand to all the other manufactures...

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all manufacturers are using these types of tricks for commercials now... and I don't care for it.

None of us are pulling a trailer up a teeter totter, none of us are pulling a frieght train, none of us are picking up our entire truck with a bed bolt... show us what the truck can do in real world conditions with real world situations!

And according to car and driver, the GM actually stops about 10ft FASTER than the tundra with its massive brake rotors. Doing more with less is impressive engineering. Doing less with huge rotors is just laziness on the engineers part IMO.

Ford started the same type of commercial that toyotas doin now where they compare the SIZE of a particular part from several different trucks.. trying to indicate that bigger is better. How the truck performs its job is what matters, huge brake rotors or ring gears don't mean much if it doesnt produce results.

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Still though, I remember a magasine doing a test of the Big three, the Toyota and the Nissan trucks pulling the same trailer, equipped the same, and the tundra out pulled and outbraked them all...

Every manufacture tries to reword things different bud, not news to me...

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The following is from a member of the Truck Marketing Team..........................

The truth about the Troubled Toyota Tundra that many miss in recent commercial...........

At the Minneapolis Auto Show kick off breakfast on March 8. Two of our Sandy Corp. product trainers did a nice job explaining the Tundra ads. I would guess all of you have seen the stupid ad where the Tundra pulls a trailer up a steep grade (a 'see-saw'), and then barrels down hill and locks the brakes up just before the end of the ramp. Seen it? Yeah you have.

Couple things to keep in mind. The Voice Over at the beginning of the spot says...."It's tough pushing 10,000 lbs up a steep grade". Myth: Toyota would like the audience to believe the trailer is 10,000 lbs. Fact: It's a 5,000 lb truck pulling a 5,000 lb trailer. A little slight of hand? You bet.

You may not be aware, but many states require that trailers be equipped with brakes over 3,000 GVWR, so having brakes on a trailer weighing 5k isn't deceptive in the least.

Then, on the way down the grade, the camera zooms in on the brakes as the vehicles comes to a screeching halt just prior to the end of ramp. Next time you see the ad....look for the 'mice type'. It indicates the trailer is equipped with electric brakes. Fact....the electric brakes stop the trailer -- not the truck. A little slight of hand? You bet.

You may not be aware, but the most liberal states and provinces require that trailers be equipped with brakes over 4,500 GVWR (Mass being the exception at 10k), most around 3,000 lbs GVWR, so having brakes on a trailer weighing 5k isn't deceptive in the least, it's required.:lol:

And why does Toyota have bigger brake pads? They need them....their truck is heavier, and a gas guzzler. Stopping distance between GM trucks and theirs is virtually identical. And why does Toyota have a 6 speed transmission? To improve their fuel economy....which is still 2 mpg less than GM's.

And don't forget....their big V8 has one axle ratio -- a 4.3. Suck fuel much EXXON loves it? GM trucks offer several axle options to optimize towing and fuel economy. Bottom line: GM TRUCKS ARE BETTER! Spread the word......armed with the truth, we can all make a difference."

WB

What did you expect, truth in advertising??? :eek:

Anyone who buys a vehicle based upon a commercial shouldn't be driving, they should be riding the bus, the short bus.:applause:

Do some research, and decide for yourself what best fits your needs and budget. :lol:

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The following is from a member of the Truck Marketing Team..........................

The truth about the Troubled Toyota Tundra that many miss in recent commercial...........

At the Minneapolis Auto Show kick off breakfast on March 8. Two of our Sandy Corp. product trainers did a nice job explaining the Tundra ads. I would guess all of you have seen the stupid ad where the Tundra pulls a trailer up a steep grade (a 'see-saw'), and then barrels down hill and locks the brakes up just before the end of the ramp. Seen it?...

All of the BS I snipped is just speculation.

Ah, you must be one of those "scared" kids from Michigan, right? The reason the 5.7 comes with the 4.3 axle ratio is because it has a "double overdrive" so you get the advantage of stump pulling grunt plus the economy of a high overall ratio, its made up for witht he double overdirve. (For those of you in Rio Linda or Michigan, this means the output turns faster than the input in both 5th and 6th gear, hence, it "overdrives"). If its really economy you want, get the small 2WD Tacoma. Most people when they look for a truck that can tow and haul like this one, rated for more HP then all the other guys 1/2 tons arent looking for a gas mizer.

Scared, arent ya! You guys are funny. If this truck wasnt worth a darn, we wouldnt even be hearing from you. Must have something to see all the detroit guys getting the undies all wadded up. :applause::eek::lol: :lol: :lol:

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And according to car and driver, the GM actually stops about 10ft FASTER than the tundra with its massive brake rotors. Doing more with less is impressive engineering. Doing less with huge rotors is just laziness on the engineers part IMO.

C/C, I looked everywhere and couldnt find any of that info. Care to provide a link. I even looked in all the Toyota literature and others, no one had a 60-0 distance. I know you read it somewhere.

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C/C, I looked everywhere and couldnt find any of that info. Care to provide a link. I even looked in all the Toyota literature and others, no one had a 60-0 distance. I know you read it somewhere.

It was in car and drivers latest issue... they did a shootout between the 5 full size trucks.

I dont think they have it online, I didnt see it on their site when I checked last week.

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Popular Mechanics did a truck test also, empty, and with 1000 lbs in the bed.

Stopping distances:

Tundra:

empty 60-0 139.86 ft

loaded 60-0 141.16 ft

Silverado:

empty 60-0 147.27 ft

loaded 60-0 152.14

So bigger brakes can help...

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The following is from a member of the Truck Marketing Team..........................

The truth about the Troubled Toyota Tundra that many miss in recent commercial...........

At the Minneapolis Auto Show kick off breakfast on March 8. Two of our Sandy Corp. product trainers did a nice job explaining the Tundra ads. I would guess all of you have seen the stupid ad where the Tundra pulls a trailer up a steep grade (a 'see-saw'), and then barrels down hill and locks the brakes up just before the end of the ramp. Seen it? Yeah you have.

Couple things to keep in mind. The Voice Over at the beginning of the spot says...."It's tough pushing 10,000 lbs up a steep grade". Myth: Toyota would like the audience to believe the trailer is 10,000 lbs. Fact: It's a 5,000 lb truck pulling a 5,000 lb trailer. A little slight of hand? You bet.

Then, on the way down the grade, the camera zooms in on the brakes as the vehicles comes to a screeching halt just prior to the end of ramp. Next time you see the ad....look for the 'mice type'. It indicates the trailer is equipped with electric brakes. Fact....the electric brakes stop the trailer -- not the truck. A little slight of hand? You bet.

And why does Toyota have bigger brake pads? They need them....their truck is heavier, and a gas guzzler. Stopping distance between GM trucks and theirs is virtually identical. And why does Toyota have a 6 speed transmission? To improve their fuel economy....which is still 2 mpg less than GM's.

And don't forget....their big V8 has one axle ratio -- a 4.3. Suck fuel much EXXON loves it? GM trucks offer several axle options to optimize towing and fuel economy. Bottom line: GM TRUCKS ARE BETTER! Spread the word......armed with the truth, we can all make a difference."

WB

and ur point is:confused: why does every domestic truck owner feel the need to knock the new tundra

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Wouldn't the larger and heavier rotors on the Tundra tend to not fade as fast under repeated stopping or long down hills? Stopping distance isn't the entire story.

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Wouldn't the larger and heavier rotors on the Tundra tend to not fade as fast under repeated stopping or long down hills? Stopping distance isn't the entire story.

Yes all things being equal...

I wish I had a dime for every "American" truck I've seen....with a Japanese bike in the bed!!!

How can you bash the Tundra and Titan while riding a Japanese motorcycle? You don't see the "Duh" factor in that?

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Popular Mechanics did a truck test also, empty, and with 1000 lbs in the bed.

Stopping distances:

Tundra:

empty 60-0 139.86 ft

loaded 60-0 141.16 ft

Silverado:

empty 60-0 147.27 ft

loaded 60-0 152.14

So bigger brakes can help...

Curious.. thats just about opposite of the car and driver results... I wonder what the exact configurations of the test vehicles were?

Car and driver tested crew cabs I think.

As for bigger rotors reducing fade... perhaps, but fade has more to do with cooling than size. Sure size can have an effect on heat dissipation, but so can good air circulation.

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Curious.. thats just about opposite of the car and driver results... I wonder what the exact configurations of the test vehicles were?

Car and driver tested crew cabs I think.

Possibly a typo by C&D?:applause:

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