Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

riding over logs

Recommended Posts

theres a big field behind my house and to get to it i have to ride over logs in tight trails, i can get over them but i dont want to have to get off and push it over, anybody have tips for riding over logs?? p.s. i have a crf150f...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well for that bike be standing up in like 2nd gear and rev up high and pop the clutch to get the front end over it. On the bigger bikes all you need to do is rock the throttle back in 2nd to get your front end over it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how big of logs..if not to big just get the front wheel over and give it some gas for the back to come over..but dont hit it to hard or a pinch flat might happen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stand up and use the throttle to lift the front and drive into the log. You don't need to clear the log with the front wheel, you just need to get the front up enough so that it contacts the log on the top 1/3. In fact, for bigger logs, it's better to hit the top 1/3 of the log with the front to allow it to kick the front up so that the rear doesn't kick too hard when it contacts the log. You must hit the log pretty square though, don't do this at an angle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a book on trail riding when i started out, and it had a section on this type of technique. It actually described this in riding over a 55 gallon barrel, which i have done. I still use this even for large trees, at lower speeds. It seems like dudes have been describing high speed get overs. This is more for slower speeds, and bigger trees.

What you do is, approach in second, or first to start out with. Pop up the wheel as you get close to the tree so that the front wheel hits in the top half or higher of the tree, then give the throttle a quick shot to bounce the front wheel up, drive the rear wheel right in, when it is about to hit the tree, give the throttle another shot, and it will climb the tree, and you will launch over it, like a little pop jump.

don't forget to stand, the whole time.

I wish i could find the book, i would love to read it again, and give it to my kids to read. the picture sequence really helped the explanation too. Hope this helps.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man you wanna make crossing logs and other obstructions easy.....Learn to preload front suspension. Imagine bunny-hopping a bicycle. First you need to be standing.Next physically push down on handlebars. Then as suspension starts to rebound feather a little clutch and power combination. It takes a lot less effort as opposed to just throttle and clutch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That vidio is about what i was saying, except you come off whith your wheel a bit higher, the vidio, is defenitly less aggressive than what i was trying to explain, but it works...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That vidio is about what i was saying, except you come off whith your wheel a bit higher, the vidio, is defenitly less aggressive than what i was trying to explain, but it works...........

Well yeah obviously the guy on the video is a professional, plus he's on a super light trials bike. With a CRF 150 and a less than pro rider it's gonna definitely be much sloppier, more aggressive, and with more throttle "whacking" than the "blipping" on the video. I just figured a visual would add to the already great info provided.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, the advice on this log jump thread is much better than the last one. Seems people are learning.

Here's a video I made to try and sink home how smacking the front tire into what you are jumping makes the jump easier. This compares lofting the front over the object as opposed to bumping the front tire INTO the object.

Seems like magic, but the compressed front suspension adds to your own body jump to get the rear tire off the ground BEFORE the log and keeps the bike more flat during the entire jump which also keeps the skid plate clear and your body in a more centered position.

Look at that TTC clip and photos and take special note how the rider extends his arms as he pushes the bike ahead to finish the jump. This also prevents YOU from coming down hard on the handle bars and shoving the front tire into the ground. The front tire lands softly without your weight driving it into the dirt.

Here's the video I posted in the other log jump thread:

http://home.comcast.net/~jc-long/clips/jumpledge2.wmv

Some of you may already have this one.

:bonk:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, here's a quick & dirty video edit job of a little log jumping clinic during a ride at Evans Creek, Washington with TT riders Oldbones and Loynz. I put both of them on my 2 spare bikes that I keep around just to give friends a chance to play on a Trials Bike.

This was the first ride on a Trials Bike for Oldbones so it was a good chance to capture the classic bad techniques for log jumping and how it differs from the correct way. BTW, Oldbones is a MUCH better Log rider now. This is old stuff.

The first run of jumps from him and myself are at normal speed and then the video repeats at 15% of normal speed. Sorry for the poor quality but this is a pocket digital video imported to Movie Maker to change the format. Adobe Premiere would not take the AVI clips straight from the camera. After making a WMV file, I then imported it into Adobe to be able to do the slow motion part. Then save as a big azz AVI file and then back to Movie Maker for the small size. YUK!!

The challenge this day was to see if we could jump the log at a 45 degree angle and as slow as possible. Watch the rear tire contact and lack of it on some jumps. Also see if you can see my jump off of the pegs at the exact time the rear tire is about to touch the log. The compression on the suspension followed by the unloading jump along with the log contact makes the rear tire almost float over the log. It's like jumping up and down on a pogo-stick.

My 3rd jump uses a little more front tire impact as discussed in the thread, but jumping at an acute angle makes it difficult to get help from the front tire contact we've been discussing. But here's proof that you DO NOT need to always hit the log straight on. And you really don't even need to "HIT" the log. No second gear approach and no wheelie into the log. Oldbones does a good example of how the wheelie to the log does not work so well.

I'll leave the clip on my web space as long as this thread stays active on the first 2 TT Pages.

http://home.comcast.net/~jc-long/clips/evanscrkjumps.wmv

Any Questions?? :naughty::bonk:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2PLY - Great Post!!

Yes, the preload and jump off the pegs are visible, once you've alerted the viewer to their existance. Good post - as usual.

Later, :bonk:

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finnally got my bike together, and went out yesterday. I realized that i do preload the rear shock, for logs, and alot of other oblstacles. I never really realized it..... especially at high speed, it just flows i guess.

I guess sometimes when your read it, it sticks out in your head better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good to hear it's working for you guys!

Yes, the slow mo is the only way I can see what the top riders are doing when I watch them on DVD. I even use frame by frame much of the time to spot some of the key techniques. And in frame by frame, you can see why many times, still photos can be misleading. If the shutter clicks while the guy is in transition from pulling back on the bars to back over the centered position, you might get a photo that looks like you are supposed to pull back on the bars and stay there.

I used to ask the top riders for tips, but then I discovered that all of the ones I asked didn't know how to explain what they did and actually didn't have a clue... they just DID IT without needing to give it one thought.

I find that a good way to become a better rider is to study one skill and then try to see it happening in detail with Slow-motion. Then go out and video tape yourself trying the same skill. When you've got it down pat, go out and learn how to describe and demonstrate it to a new rider. You will find that if you can teach it, you will learn even more yourself.

My riding improved greatly when I started trying to teach Trials to Dirt Riders that were new to the sport. Many times, the teacher gets more out of it than the student. :bonk:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the teacher gets more out of it than the student

i find this to be true in almost any case. if you have to teach it, you have to THINK about it, and you have to PRACTICE it enough to be able to demonstrate it.

GREAT VIDS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one question.

it almost loks in the first vid post that the rider is using a little front brake to compress the forks.

is that just my eyes playing tricks on me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would lover to see some of this demonstration using a 250lb trail bike. Is there any comprimise in technique required for a trail vs. trials bike. I know if i set my rebound to hop like these trials bikes, I would be over my handle bars in a flash on the next whoop section.

I figure the principles are the same, but is there anything I should try and do differently, because I don't think I could ever get my bike to be that smooth no matter how much I practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found your videos very helpful! Thank you very much. I'm still trying to get my nerve back after years of not riding. Any help is useful and I read all I can out here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
one question.

it almost loks in the first vid post that the rider is using a little front brake to compress the forks.

is that just my eyes playing tricks on me?

:naughty: Yep, just your eyes playing tricks. Tapping the front brake can help in some cases, but it was not needed here. If you are talking about the jumps over that old bridge section, I think what you are seeing is a dip in the power along with setting the knees forward in the pre-jump wind up. That was me riding so I'm sure there was no front brake added. However, there is a conscious effort to compress the suspension and a dip in the power gives me just a little more ground to use my torque to lift the front without gaining too much forward speed and is also a timing mark and the start of my body jump.

If you take another look, the first rider gets the front too high and ends up behind the bike where it's impossible to help the bike. In both videos, the rider ends up riding a wheelie into the bridge and log with a healthy skid plate crunch. Any attempt to jump off the pegs at that position will just pull the front higher and back. You should go into it as if you were diving off a diving board... head first!

So many riders are so used to making the handle bars the focus of their ride control and body attachment. They are so used to having the bars always in front of them that any attempt to lift the front wheel for a jump like this pushes their body back behind the bike. If you make the foot pegs the focus of your attachment to the bike and just allow the bars to move where they need to go, you will be able to do the diving board style of jump or similar to jumping on a pogo-stick going forward. But at the peak of your jump, you then give all of your energy back to the bike.

Watch the videos again and take note where the head and shoulders are relative to the foot pegs for each ride. Watch the elbows relax to allow the bars to come back without pushing my body back. Also listen to the motor in the regular speed section of the video and note that there is not much power being used. It's mostly body and suspension working together.

The visible difference between a sweet jump and banging into the jump is very subtle. You almost have to know what you are looking for to see it. But when you FEEL what it's like to do a good one for yourself, there's a big difference. :bonk:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...