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Towing with a Ranger 4.0?

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I've got an 01 Ranger 4X4 with 88,000 miles I'm probably going to use to move from LA back to CA with. I don't think I'm going to be able to fit everything in the 5x8 trailer this time, and the truck rental with car dolly option is a bit pricey, given my moving budget, so I'm thinking of getting the 6x12 enclosed trailer. I know my truck is a bit small for that trailer, but will it work (without over stressing the engine?) :bonk:

My truck has the SOHC 4.0 engine, slightly oversized tires and is slightly lifted, raised by the torsion bars only. I've got a class III trailer hitch. I'll also be hauling 650# of motorcycle in the bed (yz250f and ducati monster). I really don't have anything else that heavy... a smallish couch, a washer/dryer combo unit, one recliner, some basic tools and average household goods for a one bedroom apartment. I don't think I'll be 'overstuffing' the trailer. The trailer itself weights 1800 pounds empty, and has 'surge' brakes (not sure what that means, can anyone clarify? I am a bit concerned about braking with this setup).

Thoughts? Is this too much for my little truck for a four day run? :naughty:

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Check your manual for towing and GVWR, sounds like you'd be okay if you watch your temp and keep it out of the OD. I had about 500# in the back of my ranger all winter and the headlights were okay, but you might be pointing up in the sky with 650# plus other gear and some weight on the hitch too.

Good luck

Matt

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Last time I rented a 6X12 U-haul, they required a 1/2 ton or bigger truck.

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Last time I rented a 6X12 U-haul, they required a 1/2 ton or bigger truck.

I know they want a truck with curb weight of at least 3500. But I went into Uhaul last night and talked to the guy, he just asked what the weight of my truck was and entered what I told him ("oh, sure, my truck is about 4000 lb!" :naughty: ) I asked if he needed me to bring in something that actually said the specs, he said no, they'd just have me sign something saying it was all my risk anyway.

Since then I've done some research, my truck is 3100. 400 pounds less, but I will have 650# of bike in the back, if that helps!

Which is why I figured I'd get people's opinions in here, from those who tow a lot... I really don't want to have to spend $750 for a moving truck that can also tow my truck, vs. $109 for the trailer! But I don't want to be penny wise and pound foolish, either, and harm my truck, or be a risk to others... I don't think my truck is that far from the recommended range, though, so I'm thinking if I don't load the thing to the gills, and don't try to break any speed records, I'd be ok with the trailer...

thanks for the feedback, keep it coming! :bonk:

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Check your manual for towing and GVWR, sounds like you'd be okay if you watch your temp and keep it out of the OD. I had about 500# in the back of my ranger all winter and the headlights were okay, but you might be pointing up in the sky with 650# plus other gear and some weight on the hitch too. Good luck

Matt

True, but one nice thing about the Ranger, 5 minutes under each side of the truck & I can lower the front by the torsion bars, and level it out for the trip! :bonk:

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Oh and surge brakes are brakes that are activated by the tounge of the trailer. When you hit the brakes the trailer pushes forward on the hitch. This pushes on the hitch mounted brake controler and activates your trailer brakes. Simple.

I think you would be ok pulling that size trailer. You will probably have to keep the speeds around 55-60 the entire trip though. I think the biggest issue you would run into is over heating the tranny. A tranny cooler may be a good investment. They are only like $100 and you can install them yourself.

Might want to consider a weight distribution hitch. It will pull much better that way. Especialy with bikes in the back of the truck.

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With that much weight in the back of the truck you should be fine "drive Carefull"

My only concern would be the transmission in reality its only 2000 miles so no need to freak out. a transmission service and oil change might be a good idea before you go.

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Last time I rented a 6X12 U-haul, they required a 1/2 ton or bigger truck.

Here is another funny one about U-Haul-their corporate policy is that you cannot rent any trailer, and tow it out of there with an Explorer (after the whole tire fiasco), but you can rent trailers with a Ranger (same running gear):bonk:

Oh and surge brakes are brakes that are activated by the tounge of the trailer. When you hit the brakes the trailer pushes forward on the hitch. This pushes on the hitch mounted brake controler and activates your trailer brakes. Simple.

I think you would be ok pulling that size trailer. You will probably have to keep the speeds around 55-60 the entire trip though. I think the biggest issue you would run into is over heating the tranny. A tranny cooler may be a good investment. They are only like $100 and you can install them yourself.

Might want to consider a weight distribution hitch. It will pull much better that way. Especialy with bikes in the back of the truck.

With that much weight in the back of the truck you should be fine "drive Carefull"

My only concern would be the transmission in reality its only 2000 miles so no need to freak out. a transmission service and oil change might be a good idea before you go.

+1 on both these pieces of advice-take it easy (keep it under 65 or less), don't get in a rush, and for everyone's sake, if you feel tired, take a nap, get out, stretch, etc-driving tired is more dangerous than driving drunk (studies have proven this).

One other thing you may want to do, since you will be heading across I-10 at the start of summer (hot and desolate stretches) is get the cooling system inspected, flushed and filled, and replace the T-stat as preventative maintenance. May want to toss in a spare belt-they don't take up much space, and can be a lifesaver!

Good Luck, and Drive Safe! (Why don't I have a driving wheel smiley? Off to search........)

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I overheated my Dodge 1/2 ton gasser tranny on an I-80 pass in Wyoming when I moved out West with a 6X12 U-haul. The tranny had less than 10,000 miles on a full rebuild, and the ATF was fresh. I had taken the truck in for an engine oil change 2 days before I left. The helpful folks at Jiffy Lube decided to "top off" all of my fluids. Well, needles to say, there was a bit too much ATF in my tranny.

I'm older and wiser now. I do my own service. Just make sure you check the transmission fluid yourself.

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Well, a Tacoma same year was rated for 5000 lbs, the fact it has a class III hitch means yours is probably rated for that. I'd bet it will do it no problem. a 4.0 and a 6X12 should be a snap. If you are going over any Mt grades, it might be a bit slower than normal traffic. I know a 6X12 enclosed will weight in about 1,900 lbs guessing

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A 1996 Ranger manual has the following.

Manual Transmission

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.27, Trailer Weight Max 2000

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.73, Trailer Weight Max 3400

Automatic Transmission

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.27, Trailer Weight Max 3800

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.73, Trailer Weight Max 5800

Somebody told me once, "Shouldn't be a problem pulling it, stopping might."

Welcome back to CA.

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Well, a Tacoma same year was rated for 5000 lbs, the fact it has a class III hitch means yours is probably rated for that. I'd bet it will do it no problem. a 4.0 and a 6X12 should be a snap. If you are going over any Mt grades, it might be a bit slower than normal traffic. I know a 6X12 enclosed will weight in about 1,900 lbs guessing

One thing to remember, U-Haul trailers are made to withstand rental use and abuse-those things weigh about the same as a boxcar (OK, maybe a little less, but close).

Consumer enclosed trailers like Pace American, Wells Cargo, etc, are built alot lighter.

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A 1996 Ranger manual has the following.

Manual Transmission

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.27, Trailer Weight Max 2000

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.73, Trailer Weight Max 3400

Automatic Transmission

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.27, Trailer Weight Max 3800

4.0L, 4x4, rear axle ratio 3.73, Trailer Weight Max 5800

Somebody told me once, "Shouldn't be a problem pulling it, stopping might."

Welcome back to CA.

That's strange, I think the Towing cap's for manual tranny taco's are higher.

Wonder why it's opposite for ford.

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That's strange, I think the Towing cap's for manual tranny taco's are higher.

Wonder why it's opposite for ford.

Ford was having a lot of warranty claims for trans and clutch failures on the MT trucks.

That, and the Ranger and F150's manual trans isn't known for being the toughest unit.

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