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Adventure touring DRZ and extra fuel capacity

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Are you taking a gps and/or laptop for pics? Was wondering if you've hooked up an AC adaptor? Also I would advice taking your MX boots. One thing you don't want happening on the trip is an ankle injury.

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See the end of post #7 :bonk:. Mx boots are going for the off-road portions for sure, just not sure I want to wear them for the 2500 miles on pavement the trip is going to take getting to and from the start end points of the CDR.

Are you taking a gps and/or laptop for pics? Was wondering if you've hooked up an AC adaptor? Also I would advice taking your MX boots. One thing you don't want happening on the trip is an ankle injury.

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I'm kinda lost on why so much fuel capacity? The divide ride has gas. I think the longest stretch is 200 miles. I wanted a comfortble 200 mile range. The 4 gal Acerbis gives that no problem. A friend of mine built a 7 gal tank for a Honda. All he does is carry a lot of gas he does not need or skip gas stops. The dual sport Divide Ride is on my list but trail riding in ID in Sept keeps getting in the way.

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I think you're WAY too heavy--you need to lose at least half the bulk, if not three-quarters, and probably much of the weight. I made the same mistake with my KLR, trying to be prepared for everything. Forget it--with all that weight, especially as high and rearward as it is, you will have difficulty turning left from a stop-sign without falling over, much less going highway speeds (wobble) or riding on trails. I would suggest losing the extra gas tanks--walk if you have to. Make one of your bags functional as a backpack. Lose all heavyweight protective gear--carry only baselayer, two pants, two shirts, fleece jacket, down vest, lightweight rain gear. Invest in lightest possible tent (e.g. bivysack, Marmot EOS1P), sleeping bag (e.g. Marmot Hydrogen), groundmat (Exped Downmat). Forget GPS and all electronics except flashlights (one LED, one Surefire) and digital camera. Mmm... water filter, stove, half mess kit--what else do you need? Just pretend you're going camping in the Sierras for a few days--purchase more stuff as you need it. You will have a much better time without all the crap--not only will your ride be MUCH better, but it will make packing up and finding stuff much quicker and easier. Carry weight low, use soft luggage if possible (less wobble danger from translating oscillation). Dirtbagz plus Wolfmann Alpha Bag system should be plenty of room, if not overkill--if you can't fit it all in there, you might as well just do your trip in a Toyota truck. Good luck.

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I think you're WAY too heavy--you need to lose at least half the bulk, if not three-quarters, and probably much of the weight. I made the same mistake with my KLR, trying to be prepared for everything. Forget it--with all that weight, especially as high and rearward as it is, you will have difficulty turning left from a stop-sign without falling over, much less going highway speeds (wobble) or riding on trails. I would suggest losing the extra gas tanks--walk if you have to. Make one of your bags functional as a backpack. Lose all heavyweight protective gear--carry only baselayer, two pants, two shirts, fleece jacket, down vest, lightweight rain gear. Invest in lightest possible tent (e.g. bivysack, Marmot EOS1P), sleeping bag (e.g. Marmot Hydrogen), groundmat (Exped Downmat). Forget GPS and all electronics except flashlights (one LED, one Surefire) and digital camera. Mmm... water filter, stove, half mess kit--what else do you need? Just pretend you're going camping in the Sierras for a few days--purchase more stuff as you need it. You will have a much better time without all the crap--not only will your ride be MUCH better, but it will make packing up and finding stuff much quicker and easier. Carry weight low, use soft luggage if possible (less wobble danger from translating oscillation). Dirtbagz plus Wolfmann Alpha Bag system should be plenty of room, if not overkill--if you can't fit it all in there, you might as well just do your trip in a Toyota truck. Good luck.

I think the maps would weigh more than a GPS. Traveling by motorcycle is a very individualistic thing and what you take will vary from person to person. Your bike is no more loaded than some bicycles making the trip and you've got 40 more horsepower than them.

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Yes, I am way too heavy, but its not the gear:) Bulky doesn't necessarily mean very heavy. I am not taking any cooking gear at all. I'll be light weight, even loaded, compared to a lot of people who have done the ride on other bikes and the riders that I'll be going with. I got a 50 lbs dry weight or so less to begin with over my buddies who will be riding KLR's, plus they are very lacking in suspension department, let alone those riding a behemoth like a BMW GS1150 or Tiger. We will have an older KTM 640 along, which is heavier than the DRZ, and a couple riding two up on a BMW 650. A riding buddy of mine did it a couple of years ago with a Tiger. I used to have a KLR and bought the DRZ a week after riding some Ar rock garden trails with it.

Even with the IMS, I am running on fumes at 170 miles, far less if I'm working trails (read having fun). Longest stretch that I found from other people's CDR ride reports is 240, and that is primarily in one section only so they can stay empty for a good part of the trip. It could probably be squeezed down to a little over 200 if you were willing to make a time consuming detour or two off the route just for gas.

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I think you should try & lose some stuff.. in my years of vacationing, camping, travelling, etc, i've found that 'less is more'. I might miss some stuff now & then, but i'm more grateful to not be lugging it around. I think i'd wear more of a dual sport boot for that trip.. not full moto's. You'd still have decent protection. You will be primarily on dirt & gravel roads, other than pavement. you could have a pair of camp tennis shoes or flip flops for when you stop. A good set of leathers for all riding, with armor built in. Poly layers underneath for varying weather. I'd be tempted to have 2 pair of gloves, but would probably just take the heavier cold weather ones & sweat a little more in hot weather. All you need now is a small tent & bag.. your warm weather clothes can be worn in a lighter duty bag.. 35 Deg. or so. I'd definitely take a gps.. powered by the bike it's not that heavy & you can track your route, & know where you are in a wrong turn. No need to take too much food.. just a days worth at a time.. from what i understand, there are gas stations along the way.. if you have 350-400 miles worth of gas that should be enough.

Also, if you're riding with 5 guys, you can split some of the shared provisions.. water, food, beer:applause: .

I think you could lose half of your bulk & not really miss it. Try to have multi purpose items.. no need for specialized things you seldom use. I go on multi day backpacking trips carrying around 20#. I filter my water, take simple food & minimal clothes. If you have gas & provision stops every day or so, you could really travel light. Just take a credit card! They are really light. :bonk:

scotty:cool:

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I am getting the bike ready for doing the continental divide ride this summer, about 5500 miles total in two weeks, adding in the distance to get to and from the start and end points. I needed a little extra fuel capacity and storage space. My set up is with Kolpin fuel cells, sold for ATV's, and one of the JC whitney 80$ chinese givi knock-off top cases using a 1'x1' 3/8" aluminum plate mounted to the OEM luggage rack to bolt the fuel cells and mount plate for the top case to. The rack on the top case is a real Givi item. With the IMS tank I"ll have 6.7 total gallons fuel capacity (the fuel cells are 1.25 g each). In the loaded mock up picture, I also have some moose ATV tank panniers on the rear of the seat, a cortech tail pack on the topcase rack, a drybag with my sleeping bag and inflatable twin size air mattress and another generic bag on top of that, with my tent in the back. Actual loading may change when the time comes. The seat is a Mayer saddle. Tires for the trip are MEFO explorers.

DSCN0823-1.jpg

DSCN0822.jpg

DSCN0825.jpg

The Kolpins sure look great! Did you use the standard mounts and could they be mounted on the DRZ without using the luggague rack?

Cheers,

Noppy

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GPS - good. Load the maps and route. Saves lot of time looking at maps.

Where is the 240 mile section between gas on the divide ride?

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I think the maps would weigh more than a GPS.
Taking both is a good idea, with a good compass (and knowing how to use it). You always need contingency plans in case the GPS gives out.

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Yes, I am way too heavy, but its not the gear:) Bulky doesn't necessarily mean very heavy. I am not taking any cooking gear at all. I'll be light weight, even loaded, compared to a lot of people who have done the ride on other bikes and the riders that I'll be going with. I got a 50 lbs dry weight or so less to begin with over my buddies who will be riding KLR's, plus they are very lacking in suspension department, let alone those riding a behemoth like a BMW GS1150 or Tiger. We will have an older KTM 640 along, which is heavier than the DRZ, and a couple riding two up on a BMW 650. A riding buddy of mine did it a couple of years ago with a Tiger. I used to have a KLR and bought the DRZ a week after riding some Ar rock garden trails with it.

Even with the IMS, I am running on fumes at 170 miles, far less if I'm working trails (read having fun). Longest stretch that I found from other people's CDR ride reports is 240, and that is primarily in one section only so they can stay empty for a good part of the trip. It could probably be squeezed down to a little over 200 if you were willing to make a time consuming detour or two off the route just for gas.

Dude, I'm telling you--no fun will be had on trails with that load, DRZ or KLR or CR250. If you're packing lighter than some, then they're packing way too heavy to. If you don't believe me, try loading all that up and actually taking it for a ride. I can't imagine that you won't change your mind immediately.

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I'm planning the same trip for next summer with 4 other guys. I am really interested in the rack you have on back and the seat. have you ridden the seat for long? How does it feel? Where Can I go to look for one?

I wonder if you have looked at the saddle bags from at wolfmanluggage.com?

Keep us up to date!

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I'm planning the same trip for next summer with 4 other guys. I am really interested in the rack you have on back and the seat. have you ridden the seat for long? How does it feel? Where Can I go to look for one?

I wonder if you have looked at the saddle bags from at wolfmanluggage.com?

Keep us up to date!

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As someone mentioned most of the trip is going to be pavement and dirt roads. Its all a compromise, do you pack to be light on the maybe 40 miles around the lava lake loop in MT that is about the only even semi technical riding out of a 5500 mile trip or do you pack to be comfortable and have the stuff you want for the majority of the trip even though its not ideal for the short amount of harder sections. I just prefer tall and narrow on the over wide and low the way saddle bags pack on a motorcycle. Just call it a personal quirk, I've ridden plenty both ways. I'll be doing some technical riding next weekend in the Wolfpen Gap and Fourche Mountain riding area in Arkansas with all the racks. screen and IMS tank off the bike with the stock seat.

The 240 miles w/o gas was on one of the ADVrider.com posts, dammed if I can find it again there are so many.

I had a question about the Kolpin setup.

They were purchased from here:

http://www.montanajacks.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=1144

The tanks are mounted the way they are to somewhat get the heavy fuel down lower a bit and not be too wide. The tank brackets are mounted to an 12"X12" aluminum plate which is then bolted to the OEM suzuki luggage rack. The base plate for the top case is then screwed into some tapped holes in the plate.

DSCN0819.jpg

DSCN0820.jpg

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See my last post about the rack. The seat was used for this trip, 1500 miles in four days:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=280912&highlight=1510

http://www.billmayersaddles.com/Suzuki.DRZ.html

I'm planning the same trip for next summer with 4 other guys. I am really interested in the rack you have on back and the seat. have you ridden the seat for long? How does it feel? Where Can I go to look for one?

I wonder if you have looked at the saddle bags from at wolfmanluggage.com?

Keep us up to date!

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HA! That's nothin...check these guys out...I don't think he needs to worry about it...

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Terry, thanks for all the great information you've shared in this post:thumbsup: :bonk::naughty:

Hope you have a great safe ride.

CC

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Don't forget about a set of tank panniers. They'll help to keep some of the weight forward.

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Probably not an issue but is there any concern with the plastic tank on the right side getting too hot being over the exhaust like it is? Getting disfigured from the heat?

CC

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"The 240 miles w/o gas was on one of the ADVrider.com posts, dammed if I can find it again there are so many"

Someone else told me about a long section with no gas but when I looked at all the route maps I did not find any section that looked to be a problem. I wonder if it is a situation of missing a gas stop or having to go a few miles off route to buy gas. If some one knows, please post. The mountain bikers don't need gas but they sure are not going 240 miles with no support.

When I did the Oregon OBDR ride a few years back, we took one of the alternate routes which cut off a gas stop and made one section 200 miles but we could of easily gone in and bought gas if we needed to.

.

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