Using two different springs for something "inbetween"

Well I come from a mountain bike background, and I know you can do this on mountain bike forks, so I am "assuming" it can be done with motocross forks??? Somebody correct me if I am wrong.

I just bought my wife a brand new CRF150R and the stock fork springs are 0.34kg and the "optional" soft springs available are 0.32kg.

I was wondering if I could combine one of each in different fork legs to produce a 0.33kg effect.

Is this logic flawed??

Also, is there anywhere I can go to determine what the proper spring weight is for her weight or am I stuck just measuring sag, etc.

She weighs 115 lbs, and I am debating whether or not to buy softer suspension for her Showa suspension setup??

Thanks

I'm at a loss as to how you'd make the spring thing you're talking about work. I just got done rebuilding my crf 450 forks, and thinking back to the internals of it I don't think it would work well if you cut and stacked them. There is no room to place one inside the other, either, if they would even fit with eachother that way (doubtful). I put heavier springs in mine, and the bike handles so much better now.

MX Tech has awesome spring generator and bike info pages on their site, might want to take a look there.

http://www.mx-tech.com/

Good luck and have fun!

I was wondering if I could combine one of each in different fork legs to produce a 0.33kg effect.

yes. this is common. just make sure each spring is marked and you know which is soft and which is heavy. i've done this with a 4.3n and 4.0n spring in a cr 250.

yes. this is common. just make sure each spring is marked and you know which is soft and which is heavy. i've done this with a 4.3n and 4.0n spring in a cr 250.
+1

Yeah, you can do that. If the optional springs are Honda, your two sets of springs should have different numbers of dashes on the end for easy ID.

I just got done changing the seals and oil on my CRF 450 forks. I bought the bike used. The left fork had a 49 (stiffer than stock) and the right was a 47 (stock). I was pretty upset when I found the miss match and was considering (still am) buying a matched set. I must admit that when I first jumped the bike thinking wow this suspention is so much better than my old CR 250. Then later at a race hitting some huge breaking bumps and it just soked them right up. Even though the suspention works good, I still think the springs should be the same and adjusted the same to make them work good. You don't adjust the clickers different from one side to the other. You don't add different oil weights or amounts from one side to the other. I don't think the springs should be different either. It would be interesting to hear what some suspention experts have to say about it.

It's a common tuning pratice. I know for a fact that Team Yamaha will mix spring rates in the forks while testing. Ive been told to put the higher rate spring on the brake caliper side, because the load is higher there.

It's ok been doing it for 20 yesrs.

Most suspension tuners do this.

I'm at a loss as to how you'd make the spring thing you're talking about work. I just got done rebuilding my crf 450 forks, and thinking back to the internals of it I don't think it would work well if you cut and stacked them. There is no room to place one inside the other, either, if they would even fit with eachother that way (doubtful). I put heavier springs in mine, and the bike handles so much better now.

MX Tech has awesome spring generator and bike info pages on their site, might want to take a look there.

http://www.mx-tech.com/

Good luck and have fun!

he's talking about on each side.

he's talking about on each side.

Yeh, I noticed that after posting my reply... guess I'll take 'dumb ass of the thread' award this time. Great info and just glad some knowing soul could help 'em!! Doesn't matter (within reason) how we learn as long as we do!!

Ride well and often!

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