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changing tires in the field?

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Why balance? I can't say I would notice an out of balance tire when bouncing along rough terrain. Don't worry about it.

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For dirt riding I have never balanced a tire. For dual sport / road riding balancing them is nice. That Rim lock will throw them all out of wack on the road.

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Wheel balancing is getting the weight of the tire equal all the way around. If you have a heavy spot like where the rim lock is then you would put an equal amount of weight on the wheel opposite of the rim lock.

Go check the tires on any car or truck. You will see little lead weights attached to the rim. Same thing.

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How do ya'll handle wheel balancing when needing to change the tire(s) on the trail? do you just not worry about it?

Don't worry about it. The majority of the weights offset the rim locks.

Wheel balancing may be more necessary on certain bikes than others - at least our bikes are that way.

.

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can u really tell a difference if a wheel is balanced or not? i mean while ur riding it..

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if the wheel isnt spinning fast enough you wont know its out of balance. and with car tires its usually not until about 70mph when you notice its out of balance. so unless your cruising 70 mph ALL day you dont need it on dirtbike tires. and if you are going that fast all the time....i could use some lessons haha

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probably the only time they would worry about wheel balancing for a dirt bike is in super moto. am i right? or do they also now worry about it, but i think they would because they do go pretty fast

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On pavement at say 35+ mph definitely. Especially the front wheel. I dual sport an XR650R and always balance the wheels. All it takes is a couple of jack stands, a metal bar, and some stick-on wheel weights that I usually get for free at the any local tire shop....easy.

A rear wheel that's out of balance is much harder to feel in my experience. If I don't balance my rear wheel once I get up to, oh--maybe 50mph or so I can look down and see my wheel physically hopping up and down (not leaving the pavement, just working the suspension). Weird thing is I can't really feel it like I'd expect from the way it looks. Not long ago I saw a DRZ on the freeway and his back wheel was bouncing like crazy--obviously not balanced.

Off-road there's so many irregularities and bumps that it's much harder to feel an imbalanced wheel. I still think it's a good idea though. I figure just because I can't feel it doesn't mean my suspension isn't being asked to work extra hard because of it. There's no downside to balancing that I'm aware of besides the little bit of extra effort at tire-change time.

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I'm with HawkGT, I've had problems with the rear tire on my dual sported KTM 620, at times you can see the rear wheel moving up and down while on a flat surface road or highway.. Adding weights takes care of the problem..

Jack

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Has anyone tried putting that Equal stuff inside the tires instead of the weights? Not many people use it, it's a bag of sandy stuff that you throw in the tire when you put it on the rim, as the tire spins the bag breaks open and it is constantly balancing the tire. Just thought I'd throw that out there:prof:

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but would the tire really work the suspension? isnt the tire part of that unsprung weight.. i just dont get how a tired could make things above the suspension start to move. which is how i see it.. right? the suspension cant move unless something above it is moving.. on a flat road at least. im obviously wrong, some one wanna explain for a dumb kid

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I used to run with two rimlocks on the back wheel of my 450...fitted opposite to each other. Useful if running v low pressure over technical rocky stuff so I suppose that sort of balances the back wheel. I never noticed any difference on the paved stuff though.:thumbsup:

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but would the tire really work the suspension? isnt the tire part of that unsprung weight.. i just dont get how a tired could make things above the suspension start to move. which is how i see it.. right? the suspension cant move unless something above it is moving.. on a flat road at least. im obviously wrong, some one wanna explain for a dumb kid

Some suspensions are more sensitive than others - there are a whole bunch of variables.

Automotive tire shops will give stick on weights away for free around here if asked in a nice way. Get some and experiment with it to see if it makes a difference. 2.75oz front & 3.5oz back opposite the rim locks should get you close.

You could even stick some near the rim lock to simulate a heavier rim lock and an even more out of balance as an experiment.

I don't think you are dumb. Post up what you think about wheel balance after you play around with it. :thumbsup:

.

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but would the tire really work the suspension? isnt the tire part of that unsprung weight.. i just dont get how a tired could make things above the suspension start to move. which is how i see it.. right? the suspension cant move unless something above it is moving.. on a flat road at least. im obviously wrong, some one wanna explain for a dumb kid

With the wheel imbalances I've experienced nothing above the suspension (i.e. the sprung weight) moves very much. In the cases of rear wheel imbalance, I can barely feel it. I can see the wheel and swing arm bouncing up and down but the suspension absorbs most of it and the movement never makes it to the rest of the bike. In the front it shows up mostly as a fairly low frequency vibration that I can usually feel pretty easily.

With an imbalanced wheel, the suspension gets compressed from below--not above. It's kind of like running over ripples or bumps in the road. The sprung weight stays pretty much still--but he unsprung weight moves around.

An imbalanced wheel sort of duplicates the force of something oscillating back and forth real fast. So imagine holding something in your hand that's trying to move back and forth while you hold your arm out. Well, the thing in your hand would be like an imbalanced wheel and your arm would be like a swing arm. Your hand and arm are going to be forced to move along with the thing in your hand even though your body can stay mostly still.

Not sure if that helps or not.

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