im doing something wrong

ok, i am a c rider on a 2005 yz 125. im 14 and 5'7". i race new englend harescrambles. i try to stand up as often as i can and i do bad/ok. i usually finish 10th out of 14 with times usually around 10 minutes behind the average rider. ive had the bike for about a month and ive been riding for around a year so i dont expect myself to be very good yet but i have to be doing something wrong. is there anything you guys/girls do when you come to stuff like hills/rock gardens/logs/roots. any tips would be great.

if in doubt gas it. The more speed you carry over small obstacles like roots, rocks, and hills. the less you physically feel it. Momentum is key. When going through a tough section, keep standing and let the bike flow under you while your legs absorb most of the bumps

Yea what he said i'm in CT so I know exactly what terrain your on(I actually used to live in RI). I mostly sit down because I just prefer that way but in tight rough lines I stand and just let my bike really go where it wants I don't try to force it because then I eat dirt.

yea, when i say im a bad to okay rider.im saying i can actually ride a bike through the woods and get through pretty much anything that a harescramble will through at me. i just cant do it fast...

Let the throttle be your friend !

I was new to Hare Scrambles this year. I have found that the key for me is smoothness. I have found that the less smooth I am the slower I am. It takes away your endurance and will eat up the clock in a hurry. I raced MX for a long time and the rule with MX is to grip the bike and move the bike with your legs. I have found that I relax my grip with my legs and let the bike flop around and twist as it needs to and I ride smoother. The other little secret I have been trying is to hit the "tough/scary" parts with speed so I don't have a chance to psyche myself out. Your instincts are almost always right. Let yourself ride without the thinking factor. Keep your momentum up and just ride for you and no one else. Race the course and not anything else.

Good luck and keep it up right

I Let yourself ride without the thinking factor. Keep your momentum up and just ride for you and no one else. Race the course and not anything else.

:thumbsup: That was very well put!

Harescrambles are not MX races. Harescrambles are all about maintaining a fast average speed through the course. As mentioned erlier, being smooth is one of the keys to making this happen. The first couple races I rode I tried charging through the woods from turn to turn MX style. Wrong approach. The fast guys maintain speed through the turns, and don't slam on the brakes at every turn, but tend to coast and power through.

ok, i am a c rider on a 2005 yz 125. im 14 and 5'7". i race new englend harescrambles. i try to stand up as often as i can and i do bad/ok. i usually finish 10th out of 14 with times usually around 10 minutes behind the average rider. ive had the bike for about a month and ive been riding for around a year so i dont expect myself to be very good yet but i have to be doing something wrong. is there anything you guys/girls do when you come to stuff like hills/rock gardens/logs/roots. any tips would be great.

I try and push myself by taking a section of trail a gear higher than the last time I went through. It makes me look at cornering smarter.

I find that lugging the motor just under where the power hits is perfect my preference and allows me to be faster and smoother, with a power hit just a twitch of the clutch lever away.

learn to corner faster. if you have the opportunity to take a riding class, do so. even an mx class (especially an mx class, at this early stage in your career) will be a huge help, since 95% of mx is directly applicable to offroad riding.

then figure out where your weaknesses are, and work on them. if you are slow and timid in rockgardens and nasty rooty stuff, then ride them more. don't panic about riding them fast, just ride more of them, and work to keep your feet on the pegs and stay smooth. the speed will come.

going fast does you no good if it's not in control.

And make sure the bike is well set up for you... a lot of guys have handling problems who haven't done even a little bit of adjustment to the suspension or are still running the stock (sometimes terrible) tires.

Sag is key; it is the baseline for how well the front or back tire sticks in corners and also affects straight line stability. The clickers (compression and rebound) are important also; I got a terrible kick from the rear when running over rocks and roots on hillclimbs, and the front would bottom out on jumps. In fact, with the factory settings my CRF handled like a lazy spastic until I did some experimentation and found out what worked best for me- I like the front to stick hard so the back can rotate easily. - Minimal sag, stiff up front and soft in the rear.

Since making the adjustments, I can now just blow through whoops, ruts and rock gardens without worry- the bike just soaks it up! I don't get nearly as tired and I'm twice as fast. The main thing is set the bike up to be as comfortable going fast as possible. It really makes a difference!

yea, im going to send the suspension in asap but i called the guys up and they said 600 bucks. so until i get 600 it looks like its going to pretty much be stock suspesion

You don't need to have the forks and shock rebuilt or revalved if they aren't worn out and you aren't heavier than the bike's intended rider weight. There are a bunch of adjustments that can be done to your bike's stock components.- Tire pressure, sag, and the shock and forks have adjustments for rebound and compression damping. A manual helps, but we here on TT can talk you through it.

I'm a novice racer as well, though a bit older than you (31). I find myself hitting the breaks too often coming into the corners and not leaning the bike over far enough. As I have been gaining confidence I am braking less, cornering faster and keeping up with more of the faster guys. A good idea for you is to pay close attention to where the faster riders are riding faster than you and work on that. Maybe they are gaining time by getting on the gas sooner, maybe it's in the corners, maybe the rock/root gardens. Whatever it is, pay attention and work on that part of your riding.

Simple. Practice riding with faster riders and do what they do and take their advice.

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