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Corners are the most important, no matter what

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Okay, this is an overworked topic, but theres a reason for that. Im trying all I can to work on my corners, that's where the race is won and thats where you make it to the next level. I need a list of everything I need to remember when cornering.

So far, this is what I can think of.

1. Come into the corner on the back of the bike when braking and grip the bike with your knees, be hard on the brakes.

2. After all the braking bumps are gone, or when you come to the middle of the corner, make the transition from braking to getting on the gas by moving up to the very front of the bike, and placing your inside leg firmly against the rad shroud. This should all be one fluid motion.

3. Weigh your outside footpeg, and keep your elbows way up there at all times.

4. Using precise throttle control, roll on the throttle for the most traction, especially when traction is scarce (sp?).

5. Always look way ahead

Im just trying to develope my form right now, I just took some lessons and I know where I stand right now, and it really is hard to try to make the proper form your natural reaction, when I have been doing the wrong thing for so long.

But is there anything that I'm missing, because I know for sure that I couldnt have covered everything, and anything will help. Looking for some skilled MX tips.

Thanks

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3. Weigh your outside footpeg, and keep your elbows way up there at all times.

Thanks

Make sure you also straddle the outside corner of the seat so you can lean the bike over more underneath you. Weighting the outside foot peg works well in corners that are relatively flat, but just shifting your butt to the outside of the seat provides a lot of traction..

Just rememeber

"jump for show, corner for dough":prof:

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one of the most important things is to still stand up in an attacking position while your approaching the corner. if you watch the fast guys or the pros, they will stand up until they are ready to get on the gas, then they will sit down on the front of the seat and get on the gas. try it, it works. by the way, i agree with you on the whole corners are the most important thing theory. races are won and lost on the ground.

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Make sure you also straddle the outside corner of the seat so you can lean the bike over more underneath you. Weighting the outside foot peg works well in corners that are relatively flat, but just shifting your butt to the outside of the seat provides a lot of traction..

Just rememeber

"jump for show, corner for dough":prof:

Okay, thanks for the tip. Do you still weigh the peg in bermed corners though, or just flat?

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Okay, thanks for the tip. Do you still weigh the peg in bermed corners though, or just flat?

A little bit, you just want the flattest contact with the rear tire.

So basically you want to match the angle of the berm with the bike, if that makes sense. :excuseme:

If the berm is 45* angle you want to lay the bike over 45* to match. That isnt always possible but idealy that is the best way to maximize traction.

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...Im just trying to develope my form right now, I just took some lessons and I know where I stand right now, and it really is hard to try to make the proper form your natural reaction, when I have been doing the wrong thing for so long...

Thanks

Instead of riding laps, pick out a small section of two corners and a straight away. Just practice that section concentrating on the corner

Even better is if you have a large enough area, get two construction cones or use to old tires and setup an oval. Then just keep practicing your techinque.

It takes seat time to correct old bad habits.

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Instead of riding laps, pick out a small section of two corners and a straight away. Just practice that section concentrating on the corner

Even better is if you have a large enough area, get two construction cones or use to old tires and setup an oval. Then just keep practicing your techinque.

It takes seat time to correct old bad habits.

Great suggestion..I have tried that and it really helps coming into the corner. I am getting better but a long way from perfect. What really messes me up is the exit. Once the turn is completed I try to stand in the attack position but when I accelerate hard I find myself hanging on and towards the rear of the seat. It does not feel right, especially when I start to get tired....Any suggestions?....thanks

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2. After all the braking bumps are gone, or when you come to the middle of the corner,
Shouldn't you be braking BEFORE the corner, off the brakes, and on the gas entering the corner, and then on the gas harder when exiting?

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From what I know, as soon as you sit down (whenever that is, whether the middle of the corner or if you can get on the gas earlier, the better) you immediately roll on the throttle.

Socal, thanks for the tip, it makes a lot of sense and has cleared alot of my questions.

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Great suggestion..I have tried that and it really helps coming into the corner. I am getting better but a long way from perfect. What really messes me up is the exit. Once the turn is completed I try to stand in the attack position but when I accelerate hard I find myself hanging on and towards the rear of the seat. It does not feel right, especially when I start to get tired....Any suggestions?....thanks

You should be sitting on the exit of the corner. Your suspension should be doing the work when it comes to soaking up the accel bumps and keepin the rear tire on the ground.

If it feels too rough or the back tire is hopping try softening the rebound a couple clicks.

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From what I know, as soon as you sit down (whenever that is, whether the middle of the corner or if you can get on the gas earlier, the better) you immediately roll on the throttle.

Socal, thanks for the tip, it makes a lot of sense and has cleared alot of my questions.

No problem, if ya have any more ??? feel free to shoot me a PM.:thumbsup:

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I would contend that starts are the most important. It doesnt matter how good you are in the corners, if you dont come out of the first corner in 3rd place or better you probably arent going to win.

Corners are very important though and are place where a lot of passing is done.

Another thing I think you should start doing is feathering the clutch coming out of the turns. It helps.

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I would contend that starts are the most important. It doesnt matter how good you are in the corners, if you dont come out of the first corner in 3rd place or better you probably arent going to win.

Corners are very important though and are place where a lot of passing is done.

Another thing I think you should start doing is feathering the clutch coming out of the turns. It helps.

I wouldnt tell that to RC, Stewart, Villipoto or any of the big guys out there. They seem to be able to recover from bad starts because they are faster in the corners. As important as a start is, I still think that corners are the most important thing in racing. Who cares if you get the holeshot, you're going to get passed in the turns if you cant corner.

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I would contend that starts are the most important. It doesnt matter how good you are in the corners, if you dont come out of the first corner in 3rd place or better you probably arent going to win.

Corners are very important though and are place where a lot of passing is done.

Another thing I think you should start doing is feathering the clutch coming out of the turns. It helps.

I agree to some extent, starts make winning easier and are improtant but if you are faster in corners than everone else in your class you WILL make up a lot of time and pass a lot of people. I know this isnt a great example but look at some of the top pros, they can start mid- back of the pack and wind up with a podium finish.

EDIT: i just saw that post above after i was done typing mine lol.

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You should be sitting on the exit of the corner. Your suspension should be doing the work when it comes to soaking up the accel bumps and keepin the rear tire on the ground.

If it feels too rough or the back tire is hopping try softening the rebound a couple clicks.

Great point..What I was trying to explain was that if you are doing the oval or circle 8 drill or if on the track there is a rough, short distance between corners I try to stand between corners but a get pulled and end up towards the back of the seat. That causes my arms to extend and potentially a loss of control when I get tired...I think it is a matter of conditioning and strength but any suggestions on a more powerful exit when the distance between corners is short and rough.....thanks

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REMEMBER, look ahead and to the inside. I've been going very fast and popped the front wheel over the exit of the berm and lowsided because I forgot to look to the inside. You'll notice your corners are cleaner and faster.

ALSO, sometimes you can very smooth pull the front brake while going into the apex of the corner, and it seems to grab better.

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Great point..What I was trying to explain was that if you are doing the oval or circle 8 drill or if on the track there is a rough, short distance between corners I try to stand between corners but a get pulled and end up towards the back of the seat. That causes my arms to extend and potentially a loss of control when I get tired...I think it is a matter of conditioning and strength but any suggestions on a more powerful exit when the distance between corners is short and rough.....thanks

Grip with your legs more and get your head over the bars, make the bike push you not pull you.. Hope that makes sense

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i'm a new rider in south florida. most of the trails have sandy banked corners (quad trails), does anyone have anything to add for these?

thanks in advance

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I wouldnt tell that to RC, Stewart, Villipoto or any of the big guys out there. They seem to be able to recover from bad starts because they are faster in the corners. As important as a start is, I still think that corners are the most important thing in racing. Who cares if you get the holeshot, you're going to get passed in the turns if you cant corner.
I agree to some extent, starts make winning easier and are improtant but if you are faster in corners than everone else in your class you WILL make up a lot of time and pass a lot of people. I know this isnt a great example but look at some of the top pros, they can start mid- back of the pack and wind up with a podium finish.

EDIT: i just saw that post above after i was done typing mine lol.

You both make good points and I wont deny that, but, a lot of the tracks around here only run 5 lap motos. If you dont get off the line close to the front, you dont have enough time to catch up, no matter how good you are in the corners.

If the races were only 5 laps I dont see those pros being able to catch up.

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i'm a new rider in south florida. most of the trails have sandy banked corners (quad trails), does anyone have anything to add for these?

thanks in advance

You dont want to get too far up on the seat in sandy corners, your front end will tuck under to easy. Sandy corners require more throttle to keep the front end light and track how it should..

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