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DR650-'97 Inspection Plug

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I tried to remove the inspection plug and stripped the 10mm hex hole.

Is it right, or left hand thread?

Now, how do I get it out? A new magneto cover is around $100.:cry:

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normal threads... chisel and hammer time.or cut a slot in it with a cut-off wheel and twist it with a washer and pliers

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My friends 01 DR 650 also has the siezed cover. If you manage to get it out, or get a new one, use teflon tape on the threads, or some anti-sieze maybe.

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Same on my 2001. If I'm reading you right, you stripped the plastic side cover that you remove to turn the crank?? I was totally careful and I knew I was going to strip it before it happened

If you are just doing the valves, you can remove the plug that you look thru to see the timing mark, put the bike in 4th and push it til the mark lines up. It was a little hard to get it to stay there, but it was doable by leaving the bike in gear. My side cover looks like a dog chewed on it now

If you stripped the viewing hole plug, sorry

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Thanks. I wondered if I could turn the wheel to get it lined up.

I have an air lift and could jack the motor up and turn the rear wheel, right?

With help, that is.

It makes me wonder how much damage I could do, if I tried to remove the magneto cover, itself.

How can I tell when Im on the compression stroke? When it blows out the spark plug hole?

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Thanks. I wondered if I could turn the wheel to get it lined up.

I have an air lift and could jack the motor up and turn the rear wheel, right?

With help, that is.

It makes me wonder how much damage I could do, if I tried to remove the magneto cover, itself.

How can I tell when Im on the compression stroke? When it blows out the spark plug hole?

With the valve cover caps removed watch the intake valves. They will open just before the compression stroke. Put the bike in 5th gear and turn the rear wheel. Put your finger over the one open plug hole and feel the compression as you rotate the tire... you will feel it when it reaches TDC. Is it the timing mark inspection plug you stripped? Normally the crank access cover is the problem child on the DR650. :excuseme:

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I tried to remove the inspection plug and stripped the 10mm hex hole.

Is it right, or left hand thread?

Now, how do I get it out? A new magneto cover is around $100.:cry:

I did the same thing on mine. I checked and the plug was only $7.00 or so I think. You don't need to replace the whole cover, just the plug.

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I stripped the crank access plug.

Which method do I use to remove the plug?

Or, should I just leave it in and follow your suggestions to check the valves?

If I attempt to remove the magneto cover, is there a chance on breaking a cover bolt?

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I stripped the crank access plug.

Which method do I use to remove the plug?

Or, should I just leave it in and follow your suggestions to check the valves?

If I attempt to remove the magneto cover, is there a chance on breaking a cover bolt?

Because of the troubles I've seen posted here I only tried a slight attempt to remove my crank access plug. It didn't budge so I'm adjusting my valves the way I mentioned above. Works fine. I can remove the timing mark view port so I know everything is lined up correctly. I wouldn't mess with yanking the stator cover since you'll have oil to deal with and a gasket to buy. :cry: The other option is to try and chisel the plug lose. Make sure to whack it in the loosening direction if you want to attempt it. I'd worry about cracking or powdering the plug and crap going into my engine though. If you really want to replace it do it right and remove the cover before attempting to remove the plug. A bit of never/anti-seize on the new plug threads will prevent future repeats of the same fiasco. :thumbsup:

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Not necessary to ruin your magneto cover plug or risk driving a chisel into your magneto cover.  Even if the 10mm hex socket in the plug has been completely wallowed out by a 10mm hex bit, you can still remove the cover plug without doing any further damage to it, and actually make it re-useable and look presentable again.  Go to any hardware store and get a 5/16" spanner nut (basically a nut that is about an inch long).  Make sure it fits snugly into a 7/16" 6 point socket.  With a regular shallow 7/16" 6 point socket over one end of it, gently tap the other end of the spanner nut into the cover plug hex socket, with the flats aligned to where they were before the plug socket was wallowed out by the 10mm tool.  Periodically, remove the nut from the hex socket in the cover plug and clean out shavings, then keep gently tapping it in.  When it gets close to bottoming out, use a small flat blade screw driver to gently chip off any ridge that might form near the bottom of the cover plug socket so that the spanner nut can finally be driven in until it bottoms out in the cover plug hex socket and is aligned squarely.  You will notice that the spanner nut now fits very tightly in the cover plug hex socket and can only be removed by wiggling it out with vice grips.  Warm the engine, then put a 7/16" 6 point shallow socket over one end of the spanner nut and drive the other end back into the hex socket in the cover plug until it bottoms out and is straight.  It should grip well enough now to remove the plug without slipping.  I also tapped mine a few times with a handheld impact driver, but not sure if that actually helped loosen it or not.  Once you get the plug off, you will notice that the hex socket in the cover plug looks pretty good again, although now a 7/16" instead of 10mm.  With a little touchup paint it doesn't look bad at all and functions better than new.

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Not necessary to ruin your magneto cover plug or risk driving a chisel into your magneto cover.  Even if the 10mm hex socket in the plug has been completely wallowed out by a 10mm hex bit, you can still remove the cover plug without doing any further damage to it, and actually make it re-useable and look presentable again.  Go to any hardware store and get a 5/16" spanner nut (basically a nut that is about an inch long).  Make sure it fits snugly into a 7/16" 6 point socket.  With a regular shallow 7/16" 6 point socket over one end of it, gently tap the other end of the spanner nut into the cover plug hex socket, with the flats aligned to where they were before the plug socket was wallowed out by the 10mm tool.  Periodically, remove the nut from the hex socket in the cover plug and clean out shavings, then keep gently tapping it in.  When it gets close to bottoming out, use a small flat blade screw driver to gently chip off any ridge that might form near the bottom of the cover plug socket so that the spanner nut can finally be driven in until it bottoms out in the cover plug hex socket and is aligned squarely.  You will notice that the spanner nut now fits very tightly in the cover plug hex socket and can only be removed by wiggling it out with vice grips.  Warm the engine, then put a 7/16" 6 point shallow socket over one end of the spanner nut and drive the other end back into the hex socket in the cover plug until it bottoms out and is straight.  It should grip well enough now to remove the plug without slipping.  I also tapped mine a few times with a handheld impact driver, but not sure if that actually helped loosen it or not.  Once you get the plug off, you will notice that the hex socket in the cover plug looks pretty good again, although now a 7/16" instead of 10mm.  With a little touchup paint it doesn't look bad at all and functions better than new.

Great Tip, all the tapping loosens corrosion plus a warm engine. All engine fasteners should be smacked / tapped to shock the corrosion before attempting to loosen, especially case screws.

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