Jump to content

Fixing the Sherco sidestand

Recommended Posts

Hello fellow Sherco enduro owners....

A bit of warning in advance. This thread might be total overkill for the task discribed... for all but maybe the least mechanically inclined Sherco owner on the planet.

_______________________________________________

If there's one thing on the Sherco enduro models that is a common denominator of owner irritation... it's the stock, self-retracting sidestand.

It seems that all it takes is a light breeze, a fly landing on the handlebar, a cow farting in India... damn near any movement at all for the stock Sherco stand to snap up and toss your Spanish/French object of affection on it's ear.

Makes you afraid to park your bike in front of the general store to get a Co-Cola and a Slim Jim... unless its facing uphill. :thumbsup:

There have been a few threads (OK... maybe one that I recall) about correcting this annoyance, but I don't think I've ever seen someone actually say they took it apart and stared at it for awhile... so I did.

What I wanted to do initially was move the stand leg forward, to put it in more of an "over-center" position... making it less likely to snap up when the aforementioned cow farts in India.

Here’s the lump prior to disassembly.

220145936-M.jpg

220145927-M.jpg

Disassembly is not the nightmare it might first seem to be. Remove the nut and washer on the back, and with a spring puller, or if you don’t have one… needle nose vice grips, pull the spring ears from the mounting bracket tab. Note the position of the ears… inner and outer in order of which goes first.

220145943-L.jpg

From this point, taking it apart the rest of the way is a doodle. This is everything, except for a steel pivot bushing that’s still in the mounting bracket.

220145958-L.jpg

First thing that caught my attention was that the pivot bolt screws into the back ear of the stand leg, not just the nut… fantastic! More on this later.

Second thing... other than grinding/machining, there isn’t much you can do to move the stand leg further forward easily.

220145961-M.jpg

220145970-M.jpg

After finding a repeatable point of reference where I could measure my efforts, I took a measurement. I also stared at the stops quite a bit and discovered that the leg and bracket were not making “square and even” contact.

220146017-M.jpg

I ground both the leg and bracket with the idea of doing three things. Increase the forward movement of the leg before it hit the stop… and in doing so, square up the contact surfaces on both parts to make contact more solid and even.

(I considered for a moment that the angles on the contact surfaces were "designed in"... then dismissed that thought as unlikely)

I removed most of the material from the bracket, and a much smaller amount from the leg to square it to the bracket.

220146058-M.jpg

The net result at my point of measurement was 1mm, give or take a few hundredths.

220146036-M.jpg

I don’t have a photo of before and after on the bike… didn’t think of it ‘til after the fact, but… based on other photos I have, I moved the leg forward about 30mm, as measured at the legs "foot".

Instead of the leg foot being just behind the footpeg, it’s now almost to the leading edge.

220145918-M.jpg

Back to the bolt. When I took everything apart, I discovered that the bolt wasn’t screwed in tight to the leg ear, but rather finger-tight.

No doubt to eliminate any binding that might cause the leg to drag or stay in place... on a self-retracting design.

Read that last sentence again… get it? That’s right… by adjusting the tightness of the bolt (don’t forget to loosen and re-tighten the nut) you can control the tension or “drag” between leg and bracket.

220146078-M.jpg

So there you go… a modification to position the leg further forward from center, changing the angle and reducing the chance of a little bump turning into an *#@&!!! moment... and a simple application of torque to restrain the spring tension into compliant submission.

Chances are these sidestand parts vary a good amount dimensionally, so I would suggest not using my numbers or specific stand leg location as exact reference. In other words, YMMV.

Ciao… good wrenching.

C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great one, Sherco great bikes, but their stands are crap. So far they have cost me a clutch leaver, and dented my foot peg. Even broke one of my unbreakable Acerbis multiplo handguard. I tried a mod of shorting the stand by 28mm so it would lean over a bit more. Not great success. Please run this a few months and update. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi C, nice post. I just got the grinder out and sliced away while the stand was on the bike........worked fine for me. I also backed the "spring" nut off a bit, as it was SO tight it wouldn't allow the spring to seat correctly....it was all bunched up. Works a treat for me now.

Since I changed the battery over the motor really cranks, and starts with so much more authority.............I love this bike..........g.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate this stand mod tip. Am a newbie to TT, and came on board as I've just bought a new sherco 4.5i and was looking for this sort of information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I appreciate this stand mod tip. Am a newbie to TT, and came on board as I've just bought a new sherco 4.5i and was looking for this sort of information.

There should be enough Sherco threads here to keep you occupied for awhile "Monty".

Welcome to TT,

C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mine is broken, the plate which holds the arm. can it be welded? :-(

or where I could get replacement..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×