Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

How to Wheelie w/ a 450R

Recommended Posts

OK, I'm getting better but not there yet. This is what I am doing:

1. Slowly roll in 1st gear.

2. Lean back & goose the throttle - I try not to roll into it because then it just turns it into a power wheelie

3. Back way off throttle & try to balance the wheelie. Normally I back off too mch (due to fear of looping). I then reapply throttle & either don't give it enough or I turn the balance wheelie into a power wheelie. every so often I end up looping the bike (but not really too often).

I'm covering the rear brake pretty good, but still do loop. At least I'm learning to bail w/o beating myself (especially my tailbone) up. The bike muffler has been suffering.

I'm thinking that instead of trying to back off & balance with the throttle, I should try to balance by shifting my weight. I know I'm not getting the front wheel high enough & am working on that.

Anybody got any advice for me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes lots of practice to ride a balanced wheelie. Thats the only advice I can tell you. I'm in the same category as you,power wheelie more than balanced. I usually try second gear as first seems to pop up the front to fast for me and I panic. I try to keep my finger on the clutch but that is difficult when I have a death grip on the bars. Just keep practicing and you'll get it .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It takes lots of practice to ride a balanced wheelie. Thats the only advice I can tell you. I'm in the same category as you,power wheelie more than balanced. I usually try second gear as first seems to pop up the front to fast for me and I panic. I try to keep my finger on the clutch but that is difficult when I have a death grip on the bars. Just keep practicing and you'll get it .

+1 there is no secret to wheelies, just practice a lot and you'll get it. I wish they made wheelie bars for big bikes that would snap on and off, so the plastic and exhaust doesn't break or fatigue all the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

use the clutch to bring the front tire up not the gas. it shouldnt take much gas just the right ammount of gas and proper timing of the clutch. if you brake pedal is adjusted so it sits higher than your peg your going to have a problem keeping your foot over the brake and have a hard time learning wheelies. get them down good in first gear then move on to 2nd :thumbsup: since it actually harder to ride a wheelie in first imo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
use the clutch to bring the front tire up not the gas. it shouldnt take much gas just the right ammount of gas and proper timing of the clutch. if you brake pedal is adjusted so it sits higher than your peg your going to have a problem keeping your foot over the brake and have a hard time learning wheelies. get them down good in first gear then move on to 2nd :thumbsup: since it actually harder to ride a wheelie in first imo
why teh clutch & not the gas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
use the clutch to bring the front tire up not the gas.

I've seen this advice a few times on TT and I'm just not sure why. Seems to me that using the clutch is a much easier way to find yourself on your proverbial teakettle in a big hurry.

EDIT - at least while you're learning how to wheelie - too much gas, dump clutch... ass meets ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to the trials training center in TN the irst week in october. They were trials bikes but still the same principle. How they taught us to bring the front wheel up both for wheelies and to lift over logs, was to rock forward and kinda push the front suspension in with your knees. As the suspension comes back out lean back a little and smoothly roll on the throttle. It takes a few tries to get the timing right with the suspension letting out and rolling on the gas, but it is alot more controlled than clutch and gas methods. Also make sure you are compressing the front fork with your knees rocking forward, it should not take any pressure from arms or upper body. Arms are still loose on bars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't want to give it "too much gas and dump the clutch", you want to pull in the clutch, rev it about 1/2 throttle and slip the clutch out. The font will pop up, but the load on the motor will bog it down so once the front is up the engine will be in a manageable part of the powerband. If you are using the throttle only, you have to get it wide open to loft the front, and then close it down once the front is up to keep it from looping.

Sure if you have the throttle pinned and keep it pinned while releasing the clutch it's going to loop, but you only need part throttle.

The trials technique also helps, use your suspension to help. Trials bikes are a lot different than MX bikes (lighter, more torque, big flywheels etc.) so I would think the technique may be different with a trials bike compared to a MX bike (ie. the recommendation to use throttle and not clutch).

Shane Watts teaches the clutch technique (in his video as well as his school).

The "How to Wheelie" tape and instructions recommend using the clutch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an 04 crf 250r with an 07 head and I might try suggesting doing wheelies in third gear. That way you steadily rise instead of just popping up really fast. That way your already balanced going up and then the farther you get your bike up let off the throttle a little bit more and blip the throttle to keep it at steady rpms.....takes a lot of practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO on a 450, the best wheelie gears would be 3-5th as they have less torque compared to 1st and 2nd. Just be carful because you will be going a lot faster:p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

try getting on it in first gear an then slowing down. give the throttle a turn and it will pop right up. its a lot easier then jus slowly rolling. practice makes perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my experiance it is all a feel thing. Some comments have been made about weight distribution. I agree with these opinions. To get the biggest bang for your buck with weight distribution practice a lot standing up you can throw your weight back and forth a lot faster from that position. Once your get comfy with it go faster it really is easier to keep it there in 2nd and 3rd gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duIk3avS6j0

Pay attention to the way he uses the throttle/clutch together, and the way he uses the rear brake.

OK - I watched it, tried some of the things.

Clutch:

Seem like I do it alot better w/ just throttle & no clutch (maybe my clutch control needs more control). Also, I'm on a 450R, npt a 2 smoke, so torque is no problem for me.

Standing up:

Took a little getting used to compared to sitting, but after I did, realized that I had much more balance control. Although I had better balance, it was harder for me to 'crack' the throttle - I was doing more of a power wheelie. Seemed like covering the brake was less instinctive, even though the foot position was better. I think it was just a mental/get used to standing thing. All in all, I'll keep working on the standing wheelie.

So, Back to realizing I still suck at this & need much more practice! At this point I think I'm developing the right skills (throttle/balance, and eventually clutch if I decide that will help me get the wheel up in a controlled fashion). Would Shane Watts' video help (how much is it?), or am I doing the right things & just way low on practice/skill?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you are not good at wheelies i would not stand up! its really easy to loop standing up,the taller you are the faster you go over. not to mention its easier to work the controls while sitting.people like to stand because it lowers the balance point,you can see better,lofts the front with less effort.

this is one of the better vids i have seen. it shows the importance of the rear brake but does not tell how to work up to it. proper brake control is harder than he makes it look.

to practice this you simply use your brake to set the wheelie down. hoist the front give the rear brake a dab,see what it does,repeat a little higher a little harder,repeat eventually you will learn to lightly drag the brake olny when needed.

once you have mastered sitting than its time to move up to standing,high chairs and whatever else you crazy kids have invented this week.

standing wheelies are important because you will have to loft the front over stuff,logs,mudhole,creek but learn to do them sitting first its safer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

your doing things right it just takes seat time. the first time i did a stand up i missed the rear brake and looped it =broken hand and a black eye.

start slow i cant stress that enough.

dont knock the power wheelie it is just as impressive once you learn to shift gears. it is also a very helpful learning tool and should not be overlooked.

the key to shifting is to preload the shifter lever before you want to change gears(no clutch) when you hit the balance point the instant you blip the throttle it will go into the next gear,smoothly roll back into it,repeat for more gears until your goin to fast or get scared.

always wear gear!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×