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Braking supermoto calipers.


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Anyone using Brakings 4-piston supermoto caliper? If so what banjo bolt did you use? It's a 10mm X 1.25 thread. A stock banjo bolt out of a dirtbike caliper is to long and the fluid hole won't line up with the fluid groove in the Goodridge brake line banjo fittings I'm using. Any hints? 🙂 I'm trying to plumb a Brembo superbike master cylinder to a Braking 4-piston using a Goodridge brake line kit from Lockhart Phillips.

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I had a similar situation fitting my MotoMaster 4 pot caliper. The stock banjo was course thread and the caliper required fine. I did not have a fine banjo that was the right size, all of them were too long.

I just hacksawed it down, used a thread file to make sure the cutting area would thread nicely, shot some compressed air around the banjo to remove any loose particles, and thread it in. 🙂

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All this talk about banjo bolts is keeping me up at night.. it's all i've been thinking about for the last week. 🙂

Anyway, now it's my turn to help you. :D

Like you, i'm using Goodridge lines front & rear.

Goodridge actually make banjo bolts in both sizes (1.0mm & 1.25mm) and they're shorter than the stock bolts.

Here's a link to the dealer i bought my lines and banjo bolts from:

http://www.johnstamnas.com/

They make them with zinc, stainless or chrome plating.

Otherwise you can get them in anodized alloy but i would advise against it. I originally bought some anodized blue and i snapped one in the caliper. You can't get them tight enough to seal the fluid leak. :D

standardbanjo.gifalloybanjos.gif

I've got a spare chrome plated one in 1.25mm thread that you can have for free. Is it worth sending?

Mike. :D

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DRZ Downunder, thanks Mike, I need to order some hose and a couple of fittings plus I need two bolts I have two bikes going. I figured at the last minute that I would need to use Goodridge banjo bolts. Nissan hose fittings on the DRZs are thicker than the Goodridge fittings. Did you build your own lines or where they pre-assembled? If you built your own how did it go and did you like it? Also thanks to everyone for their thoughts have a good day. Steve

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  • 17 years later...

hello,  i have a 4 piston braking caliper on my ktm 520 exc and a stock master cylinder and stock brake line with new sintered brake pads and braking 320mm disc but the stopping power is poor, the brake is squiquing and the brake lever is soft,i have bleed it but its still not strong like stock caliper, the lever is also to soft...what could be the problem, i also had radial master cyilinder with different brake line but the feeling is still the same, no real stopping power, i had to turn the free play of the lever all the way to maksimum but its still to soft and no stopping power

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11 hours ago, jomaboisland said:

hello,  i have a 4 piston braking caliper on my ktm 520 exc and a stock master cylinder and stock brake line with new sintered brake pads and braking 320mm disc but the stopping power is poor, the brake is squiquing and the brake lever is soft,i have bleed it but its still not strong like stock caliper, the lever is also to soft...what could be the problem, i also had radial master cyilinder with different brake line but the feeling is still the same, no real stopping power, i had to turn the free play of the lever all the way to maksimum but its still to soft and no stopping power

I think you have a combination of two different problems to solve.

  1. Proper brake pad bedding.  Search the internet on this subject, but essentially until the new pads have transferred some of the braking material to the new rotor, the brake won't have any "bite".  
  2. ****Master Cylinder sizing.*****  If you're using the stock 11mm master cylinder on the Braking caliper, then no matter what you'll have a VERY soft and squishy lever.   You'll need to upsize the piston to firm up the lever.   Aim for somewhere in the 14 - 16 mm mark.  There's a bunch of math you can do on this subject figuring out what Brake Lever Ratio you like.. but, at the end of the day, it'll come down to what feels good for you.

If you want to read more about this subject, see 

Adjusting the lever pivot (what I'm assuming you meant by free-play) isn't the right way to go in this situation, although it can help because you'll have more lever travel available.

Fixed caliper brakes all suffer from noisy brakes.  What you're hearing is the brake pads vibrating against the piston.  Having ridiculously clean pad backings before applying high quality brake pad lube can help a little.. but, the noises will come back.  

Edited by zibbit u2
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