does it annoy you? older bikes

im in the process of rebuilding a 99 husqvarna 4 stroke to do a supermoto conversion. it was purchased from somebody that should not work on let alone ride a bike u know the type of yokle im talking about, they would wrather spend half an hour polishing a swingarm than making sure the carb is on right. but honestly the more work i do the more damage i find here and there and its not all stuff that can be easily or cheaply replaced. so for any of you out there that dont have 1 and 2 year old bikes does it ever rack your nerves that no matter how much work you do and parts you replace its still gonna be rough around the edges. i just had to vent :applause: blah im gonna go watch the houston sx now

Yea I know that feeling. I do some of the work on friends bikes and you start out doing something simple and it turns into a head ache :applause: . You start off fine then find this bent or that broke or something else striped.

It's seams like my buddies always forget to mention that they started the project,took a horrible turn,then re-assembled it and brought it over. Then the answer to every question becomes "I never touched that since I've had it".

or if you helped fix the bike then they sell it right after to make a profit of your work!

i few years ago i had a 89 kx 250 it was a prety good bike but everytime i looked closely at it something was broken. i noticed a few teeth were missing off the sprocket so i bend down to look at it and see busted spokes on the rear rim. one day it wouldnt start so i throw a wrench on the spark plug and put some force on it to unscrew the plug, and the whole motor moves a little, i look closer and both front motor mounts are broken. it was my first bike that i ever worked on myself, i was maby 16. it was a good learning experience, i learned to pull motors and replace all kinds of gaskets and ext ext. when i bought my 426 it was sooo nice having a bike that didnt have so much broken crap on it haha

From this:

94CR250-PreCapnAmerica.jpg

To this:

CapnAmerica.jpg

Yeah. I feel your pain.

It's a learning experience. I hadda do the same thing with my first 2t, a 1979 Suzuki RM125. When my dad and I bought it, the only thing we knew about 2t's is that the oil had to be mixed in the gas. I learned real quick what maintenance was, since the guy we bought it from had no idea what he was doing. Once it was up to speed maintenance wise, it was a great beginner's 2t bike.

Im having the same problem with my (new to me) yz250.It all started as a water pump gasket and a front brake line.To a top end rebuild,radiators,etc.etc.so far im looking at $1,000 to add + the 500 for the bike:censored:

bills pile up fast when you're trying to catch up on 5+ years of maintenace/wear and tear, damn i need to sell my bikes and get a newer big bore ktm husaberg or newer husky

the owner of my 125 overtightened every bolt, did service his airfilter because you can tell dirt got into the carb and the scoring on the cylindr wall. and there was no grease in the linkage. it sucked lol

oh this thread reminds me, my buddy has a 2001 yz250f, the last ride that bike was on was in smith valley nevada, the valves were so shot that we had to bump start his bike every time. then he looped on a prety nasty hillclimb, and the bike looped over his head and came tumbling back down the hill. bend the bars, broken levers, ripped most of the exhaust off, bent the subframe really bad, broken plastics. ect ect. he just bought a 450, but wants to fix the bike so his friends can ride it. hes thinking it will be $1,200 to fix the bike, i kinda think that he could part it out and take the money from that and add the $1,200 to that money and buy something else. but idk

If you have to rebuild anything that has been let go, use my simple formula: Total up what you think the whole project will cost, then double it. That will put you somewhere in the ballpark. And it doesnt matter what you're fixing. It work just as good on trucks, bicycles, and rc cars as it does on bikes. My badass XR80 project started at $300 and ended up costing ~$650.

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