front sprocket stuck......?????

All right now, my memory isn't as good as it used to be:eek:

I'm trying to take off the 15 tooth front sprocket & put a 14 tooth

on in it's place for an upcoming ride and I just can't remember

which way the nut spins....... right hand or left hand thread??

I bought this 2003 DRZ400E last year and haven't changed the gearing yet,

but it sure seems to be a bit difficult to turn.........geeze I hope he didn't

have a BIG TUBE of Red LocTite nearby when the PO tightened up the nut:banghead:

Thanks in advance:thumbsup:

HappyRiding !!

:applause::)

it's a lefty loosey deal on that.

some of the drive torque is lost when loosening or tightening of the nut due to the bike slipping a little while holding the brake.

sit on the bike, hold the front & rear brake & use a long handle ratchet or breaker bar. i use a section of pipe over a ratchet for leverage when needed.

it's a lefty loosey deal on that.

some of the drive torque is lost when loosening or tightening of the nut due to the bike slipping a little while holding the brake.

sit on the bike, hold the front & rear brake & use a long handle ratchet or breaker bar. i use a section of pipe over a ratchet for leverage when needed.

lefty to loosey.....good phrase to remember:thumbsup:

So, that's what I thought! But geeze, the 3/4" 18inch long Breaker Bar

isn't budging that 30mm socket:foul:

maybe I'd better get out Old Bubba, my 24" Breaker that's made just for situations like this:eek:

HappyRiding !!

:applause::)

Real tough to break the big nut loose with a breaker bar. Really need an air gun to do it. You would be putting a lot of stress on the drive line doing it manually. Perhaps you can visit the local repair place, have them break it loose for you?

Harbor Freight 1/2" electric impact, $39.99.

It will last the average shade tree mechanic a lifetime, and save him a lot of aggravation along the way.

Sometimes tightening it first can help removal...or try beating the breaker bar with a large persuasion device AKA hammer, while your neighbor sits on it drinking a budlight and holding the brake...if memory serves me, the nut will NOT come off without budlight...its wierd

Sometimes tightening it first can help removal...or try beating the breaker bar with a large persuasion device AKA hammer, while your neighbor sits on it drinking a budlight and holding the brake...if memory serves me, the nut will NOT come off without budlight...its wierd

First - I have found that several other "lubricants" will suffice. Labatt Ice comes to mind.

Second - does your neighbor often sit on your breaker bar?

Real tough to break the big nut loose with a breaker bar. Really need an air gun to do it. You would be putting a lot of stress on the drive line doing it manually. Perhaps you can visit the local repair place, have them break it loose for you?

yeah, this "sprocket swap" is turning into a real....Topes.gif

Harbor Freight 1/2" electric impact, $39.99.

It will last the average shade tree mechanic a lifetime, and save him a lot of aggravation along the way.

.....dang, I was just there today buying a "large sized socket set" for the

purpose of getting it off. Guess I shoulda' got the electric impact gun

too:banghead:

I do have an air compressor, is the electric better than the air version....or should I go with the air gun???:applause:

HappyRiding !!

:):cry:

Pneumatic (air) impact guns consume large volumes of air. Unless your compressor is rated to handle it I'd recommend the electric. Just compare the cfm rating on the compressor with the cfm requirements of the air gun.

Once you get the sprocket changed don't forget to locktite it.:applause:

LOL I meant the neighbor sitting on the bike...but if shes single female and hot, the breaker bar may be fine.

Personally I like air stuff, but you really dont wanna buy cheap...and when it says 90 psi max or damage to tool will occur...thats just a suggestion, they really start working great around 140 lol

I'd agree, but I never know when the wife is gonna wander over to see what kind of trouble I'm getting into next.

Air impacts are my first choice. It just doesn't make a lot of sense if someone needs to buy a compressor to handle the load of a tool they are only going to use once or twice a year. I may use the compressor I have for doing trim work to fill a soft tire, but it won't run my impact wrench. Then again, I'm not gonna drag my shop compressor from job site to job site.

Leverage- Just give your 24" breaker bar a little help.Like a 3 or 4 foot long pipe.

Oh , and you'll probably need a small gear puller to get the sprocket off.

A quick hit of heat from a propane torch might also help, especially if there is already some loc tite on there. Not too hot though, the rubber o-ring seal is right behind that sprocket...

I guess I was lucky. I checked mine this weekend and after bending the locking tab back, the nut came right off by hand!!

red loc tit is fine for spilnes, I see no reason to use it on the nut, as to avoid the issue ya have.

okay now ya'll, I'm about fit to be tied:banghead:

quick review:

1.) bought bike last fall and no, I didn't know the previous owner,

but the bike appears to be well taken care off

3.) it also had brand new hi-quality o-ring chain & sprockets

4.) I've never had the front sprocket off yet

5.) this has always been an Arizona bike & rust

is not an issue

.........but the time has come for me to change the front sprocket

from a 15 to a 14 for an upcoming ride:eek:

the problem is I can not get that dang thing loose:foul:

the big bar didn't work.....Old Bubba didn't work either

(Old Bubba is a 24" long 3/4" drive breaker bar...and NO, I didn't say BAR BREAKER:busted: )

Today I even put a big electric Kobalt Impact Gun, 420 ft lbs torque

and it WILL NOT BUDGE...PERIOD!!:)

I'm going to have to head across town to a friends garage I guess. He has

the torch and the big power air gun outfit He's a very experienced diesel

mechanic and is an expert at getting the job done.

I won't be able to hook up with him for a couple of weeks, so before I do this, does anyone have anything else to add?

Thank you in advance once again:thumbsup: :applause:

HappyRiding !!

:cry::banghead:

Uh.... did you bend back the lock washer that's just behind the nut? Dumb question probably, but I re-read the thread and didn't see it mentioned. The washer in question should have bent up "ears" around the C/S sprocket nut. You need to take a small screwdriver and push those down flush with the surface of the sprocket.

Uh.... did you bend back the lock washer that's just behind the nut? Dumb question probably, but I re-read the thread and didn't see it mentioned. The washer in question should have bent up "ears" around the C/S sprocket nut. You need to take a small screwdriver and push those down flush with the surface of the sprocket.

yep...sure did!...in this case, nothing is a dumb question:thumbsup:

HappyRiding !!

:applause::)

Pneumatic (air) impact guns consume large volumes of air. Unless your compressor is rated to handle it I'd recommend the electric. Just compare the cfm rating on the compressor with the cfm requirements of the air gun.

Once you get the sprocket changed don't forget to locktite it.:applause:

Normally I would agree but when taking of one nut, like the CSS, or several ones like the rear spocket a small compressor will work fine. I have a small pancake compressor and use my cheap pneumatic air gun for this purpose and it works fine.:)

Normally I would agree but when taking of one nut, like the CSS, or several ones like the rear spocket a small compressor will work fine. I have a small pancake compressor and use my cheap pneumatic air gun for this purpose and it works fine.:applause:

how much torque is your gun??....the Kobalt Electric I have from Lowes supposedly puts out 420 ft lbs and didn't budge it.

Normally I would agree but when taking of one nut, like the CSS, or several ones like the rear spocket a small compressor will work fine. I have a small pancake compressor and use my cheap pneumatic air gun for this purpose and it works fine.:applause:

Yes, to a point. I was thinking that for all around use an electric may be a better buy in the long run for those who won't use it daily. I wasn't really thinking of it in a use it one time for this particular job and then leave it under the bed for eternity sense.

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