06 KX 250 Front End Push?

I have an 06 KX 250 and I am having a little trouble with front end wanting to push. I have had the bike respung for my weight and I also have recently replaced the stock linkage with the PC Circuit Unit. The new linkage helped settle the rear end down and did help a little with the push on the front end. But the front end does not feel planted in a turn, I am not very confident with the front end. My best friends 07 KX250F is amazing, just look through the turn and the bike is there. I have played the clickers a little and I am at loss. Would a revalve be worth the dough? The last thing I can try is to raise the fork tubes, will this make a big difference? Thanks ahead for the help!

I raised mine 10mm on my 05,and it was better enough to be noticable.I'm a c classer so take it FWIW.

With the linkage you droped the rear of the bike so now the front is pushed out more, I would raise the forks in the clamps 10mm.

Raising the forks is a good start, and like crf dude said with the link you have to raise them to balance it out. If it still pushes you might try slowing down your fork rebound.

I have an 06 KX 250 and I am having a little trouble with front end wanting to push. I have had the bike respung for my weight and I also have recently replaced the stock linkage with the PC Circuit Unit. The new linkage helped settle the rear end down and did help a little with the push on the front end. But the front end does not feel planted in a turn, I am not very confident with the front end. My best friends 07 KX250F is amazing, just look through the turn and the bike is there. I have played the clickers a little and I am at loss. Would a revalve be worth the dough? The last thing I can try is to raise the fork tubes, will this make a big difference? Thanks ahead for the help!

The fork isn't diving and it's pumping up.

Raising the forks in the clamps will help, but it's not a solution. It just puts more weight forward. Same as decreasing sag and all that stuff.

Open up the compression clickers a bit then test.

If that does not solve the problem, lower the oil level.

If you want, you can test the lower oil level theory by removing one or both of the bleed screws and taking it for a short spin.

Bottom line - a bike will not turn unless the fork dives.

Thanks everyone, really appreciate the help!

DaveJ, I had my compression out to 14 clicks and it still feels unsettled. I would like to try lowering the oil level as you recommended. I am a C class rider and I weigh around 170. What is the best oil to run and what amount? Thanks for the help.

DaveJ, I had my compression out to 14 clicks and it still feels unsettled. I would like to try lowering the oil level as you recommended. I am a C class rider and I weigh around 170. What is the best oil to run and what amount? Thanks for the help.

DW1972,

14 clicks out should put that hypothesis to rest.

But I think you should test my theory on the oil level before you go through a rebuild. I could be wrong about this.

I'm only saying this because it's the most common problem and the simplest fix, but there could be something else going on here.

Just pull the bleed-vent screws and do a quick buzz on a few corners. It may spit some fluid out but at least it will verify that is the issue. Don't hit any big jumps or do anything crazy - just a few tight corners. You'll know right away when you feel it.

If this proves correct, I would start off at 300ml/cc then add 5ml/cc at a time to both forks. Test at each increment for cornering and the compromise to bottoming performance. If you get to 320ml/cc, start adding just 5ml/cc to just one fork at a time.

The reason for this is that the air/oil ratio rate (curve) comes up really quick on this fork and 5cc/ml can make a big difference when it comes to fine tuning and hitting that sweet spot.

If you need some help with how to do this let me know.

As for oil, I really like the K2C from KYB and of course I think the 215/VM2-K5 when applied correctly may be a good choice as well - the choice would depend on what else you do or do not like about the performance of this fork.

In either case, we may only be able to take the simple approach so far before we start running into limitations that will need to be resolved with a re-valve.

Does that help?

DaveJ, really appreciate all the help! I will most definitly give this a try! Now the hard part, I have never changed the oil in the forks myself. Is this something that is very technical? If it not to crazy of a job, I can do it. Just need to know how. Once again thanks for all the info, it is greatly appreciated!

DaveJ, really appreciate all the help! I will most definitly give this a try! Now the hard part, I have never changed the oil in the forks myself. Is this something that is very technical? If it not to crazy of a job, I can do it. Just need to know how. Once again thanks for all the info, it is greatly appreciated!

It's somewhat technical but there is a lot of great support here as well as many other Internet sources, so it's not like you won't get into trouble. You'll need a few special tools but again, it's not a big deal.

Besides, it's a great way to learn, save some money and you'll get a better understanding of how things work, which to me is invaluable since it allows you to really pull the connection together between rider and machine.

Let us know what you need and we can start there.

:applause:

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