Braking when standing up

Dwight,

Have you got any pointers as to how to improve braking in the standing position.

I've recently been trying to ride standing up to improve my technique but I find it real hard to get a good feel for the front tyre when standing as opposed to sitting and have locked and lost the front a couple of times.

Thanks

Daz

Corners, in straights ??? Each scenario is different.

Corners, in straights ??? Each scenario is different.

Braking for corners, particularly when its bumpy and off camber.

Seated is no drama, but I cannot get the "feel" for the tyre standing.

You may need to adjust your lever down to help with that. I had worked on my bike and left the levers too high right before a race. Didn't notice it until I got going, and it was horrible. I had to bend my wrists too much while standing, and it really effected my braking (and gave me a boat-load of arm pump).

(Standing straight line braking)Keep your weight towards the rear of the bike,grip the bike with your knees between the tank and seat junction to stop your body from comming forward.Then keep your arms firm but bent to absorb rough ground and get used to applying both front and rear brake.Just practice this until you get the feel of balanced front and rear braking.:applause:

In corners you should be sitting as far forward as possible to keep your weight on the front wheel.Keep your leg up while leaning into the corner and accelerate smoothly out of the corner.

I try to mainly use rear brake while standing, im not sure if that is the best way but it has worked for me.

Most of your braking is in the front brake. Go into the corner deep using the front brake and rear. Once at the corner appex , sit and turn. Now using mostly rear break to control your turn speed. Keep one finger on the front brake still.

Dwight

try to use only one finger on the front there is no need for more than one or maybe two fingers on the front brake

adjust levers for relaxed position while standing

do not sit on your bike!!!!!

practice only braking the front, then the rear

and both brakes together try this on straights

after that go and do some 00000000000000000000

and after that

88888888888888888888888888888888888888

I had the same problem size 14 boot kept gettin in the way. Solution LEFTHAND REARBRAKE problem solved!!

Most of your braking is in the front brake. Go into the corner deep using the front brake and rear. Once at the corner appex , sit and turn. Now using mostly rear break to control your turn speed. Keep one finger on the front brake still.

Dwight

I usually try to sit as soon as possible if standing before a turn. What you are saying, should it be done if you are going over obstacles before the turn? I rarely stand for any reason other than getting over rocks and such.

I have found, and I think Dwight is saying, that you sit when you are going to make the turn.

My thought is to drop to the seat to increase weight on the front wheel at the moment you need the traction the most. The Apex is the turning point and so thats when you drop to the seat, not before.

Others have said, if the turn is bermed in some way, brake to the beginning of the berm, then WFO through the turn using the berm to direct the bike.

The timing is not hard to get, but remembering to do it everytime is the trick.

Hate trying to answer with another question but what kind of trails are you riding? The reason I ask is alot of the stuff I ride, sitting down in corners is only going to get me in trouble and that might be similar in your situation. If you dont have obsticals to get over that require you to come out of corners standing up then the previous responses are all good but if so and you do have to stand entering and exiting then things get done a little different.

All the advice on this topic is generic.

In other words, the point is to try to sit at the moment you are going to pivot.

Every turn is different and how to turn quickly is also different.

What I call a obstacle is different than what you, or Dwight, will call an obstacle.

Turning while standing is different because you are more aware of how much the tires are slipping, especially the rear if done right.

When I first got on Thumpertalk I mentioned that riding quickly seems more flying a plane than steering a bicycle. Some agreed, some disagreed, because everyone is different.

It is very seldom that people agree.

All the advice on this topic is generic.

In other words, the point is to try to sit at the moment you are going to pivot.

Every turn is different and how to turn quickly is also different.

What I call a obstacle is different than what you, or Dwight, will call an obstacle.

Turning while standing is different because you are more aware of how much the tires are slipping, especially the rear if done right.

When I first got on Thumpertalk I mentioned that riding quickly seems more flying a plane than steering a bicycle. Some agreed, some disagreed, because everyone is different.

It is very seldom that people agree.

And also MX techniques are different than offroad because it's a natural course. Sometimes you can apply MX techniques, sometimes not. MX riders like to hit the trails because they like to learn new tricks and force themselves to think outside of the box.

But in the box, in MX you brake only into turns, crouching, with your backend over the rear wheel, and then you sit into the corner, with your pelvis as close to the tank as possible, one leg pushing on the outside peg, the other extended. And then you blip the throttle, and that's because in MX you're either accelerating OR braking. But that's MX.

Trail riding is mostly about surviving the ride and challenging yourself, rarely about speed. You are busy looking ahead to analyze the trail as well as looking for low laying branches and incoming traffic. Which means that most of the time you're standing up, no matter what. You usually sit down when in a tight corner.

You brake when getting into turns or when you go downhill (some don't brake at all) and if the situation commands to be standing at that moment, well that's what you do.

Just wondering now if I have my bars set too low for standing?

They feel perfect for sitting, but as I'm new to standing up i'm not sure if it feels weird because it is new or because the bars may be too low for me.

Basic question but this may solve my problem?

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