best way to get stator off

I'm in the middle of tearing me engine down. I can't seem to get the stator screws off without them wanting to strip. What's the best method to get them off? Thanks in advance.

Impact driver...

Impact driver...

Is that one of them things that spins the screw as you hit it?

Yep...:thumbsup: It will help to keep you from stripping the heads.

If the screws are corroded from water leaking past the ignition cover, soak them with something like PB Blaster first.

When you're finished and putting eveything back together, seal the ignition cover with some silicone to keep water out.

Yep...:thumbsup: It will help to keep you from stripping the heads.

If the screws are corroded from water leaking past the ignition cover, soak them with something like PB Blaster first.

When you're finished and putting eveything back together, seal the ignition cover with some silicone to keep water out.

Thanks for the help. I went to Sears and bought the manual tool for 19.99, worked like a charm! The only corrosion i see is like chaulky/sandy similar to a battery terminal.

A shot on the head of a fastener with a hammer and punch (in a pinch I'll use a 3/8 extension) will help ease removal on fasteners installed into aluminum. Doesn't work all the time but it does help. If I'm removing an engine cover I go around to each bolt and give it a little tap first. Either way, those impacts will save your a$$ many times.

Thanks for the help. I went to Sears and bought the manual tool for 19.99, worked like a charm! The only corrosion i see is like chaulky/sandy similar to a battery terminal.

That white powdery corrosion happens when two dissimilar metals are in tight contact, like steel screws in aluminum threads, and are exposed to moisture. If left unchecked for long enough, the fasteners will eventually weld themselves into place. That's why it's so important to use a bit of anti-seize compound on all of the fasteners on our bikes. I use Noalox anti-corrosion grease on all of my bolts and screws. You can buy it at Home Depot, it's actually intended to be used on electrical junctions between copper and steel or copper and aluminum. It prevents elecrolytical corrosion when two dissimilar metals are fastened to gether. But if nothing else is handy, even a light coating of grease will work.

Two out of the three screws for my stator came out easily; however, the third was not as cooperative. Luckily, the head of the screw was quite thick, and I was able to slot it with a Dremel tool. I then used a flat bladed screwdriver to remove it. Still, it was not easy.

That white powdery corrosion happens when two dissimilar metals are in tight contact, like steel screws in aluminum threads, and are exposed to moisture. If left unchecked for long enough, the fasteners will eventually weld themselves into place. That's why it's so important to use a bit of anti-seize compound on all of the fasteners on our bikes. I use Noalox anti-corrosion grease on all of my bolts and screws. You can buy it at Home Depot, it's actually intended to be used on electrical junctions between copper and steel or copper and aluminum. It prevents elecrolytical corrosion when two dissimilar metals are fastened to gether. But if nothing else is handy, even a light coating of grease will work.

And in places where an anti seize isnt a good idea because of vibration but you still need electrolyitcal/galvanical protection, Loctite 242 works well.

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