new 08 break-in maintenance???

I'm new to working on bikes and I'm very cautious to go into anything I'm unsure of such as completely disassembling and cleaning my front suspension. I don't have the right tools either so I'm wondering how big a deal it is not to do this as suggested the manual. I don't want to dig into my valves to check clearance either, lack of experience and tools again. I changed the oil and filter after about 3/4 of a tank of gas after breaking it in. I'm going to tighten my chain and my buddy who has an 05 only does oil/filter, and air filter maintenance and he has had no internal issues. suggestions?...

Welcome. Do a search on this subject - lots and lots and lots of discussion about it.

I'm also curious on what to lube besides my chain and sprockets after washing my bike, I have a small powerwasher and I've read your supposed to stay away from bearings and suspension components which is hard to do but I need to know what to lube afterwards.

First thing I would buy would be the service manual for the bike. It tells you step by step what to do to check valve clearances, suspension disassembly, and everything else that you would ever need to do to the bike. The first thing I did when I bought my bike brand new, was to take the linkage and swingarm apart to make sure they put plenty of grease in those bearings from the factory. I would also buy a can of cable lube to make sure you have all of the cables lubed as well. It's intimidating to work on your bike at first, but you have everyone on this site to help you out, and the service manual does an excellent job of telling you how to do everything.

I have the competition manual/owners manual which does tell you step by step. A store I trust sold me it and prepped the bike for me. I'm assuming they greased all the appropriate components. I know, assumption is the the mother of all f-ups. I will call them to make sure I know what they did and didn't do. I just want to do all necessary break-in maintenance so I can stop worrying.

I have the competition manual/owners manual which does tell you step by step. A store I trust sold me it and prepped the bike for me. I'm assuming they greased all the appropriate components. I know, assumption is the the mother of all f-ups. I will call them to make sure I know what they did and didn't do. I just want to do all necessary break-in maintenance so I can stop worrying.

Lately, Honda seems to have been doing a better job of greasing the bearings so I wouldn't worry about that for now.

Ride the bike for 30-60 minutes like you normally would. Don't rev it it to the moon and don't lug it in too high of gear either. Drain the engine/tranny oils, replace the oil filter and fill it back up with a non-synthetic oil. Then you are ready to ride it as hard as you want. The next oil change should be at about 5 hours and then you can make the switch to a full synthetic oil because the rings should be fully seated.

Every time you stop for a drink at the truck, you should check your spokes. The spokes adjacent to the rim locks will loosen and if you don't stay on top of them, you will ruin your wheels. It will take 4-5 hours of riding and tightening before they seat in. At that point you can check them at 2-3 hour intervals. The stock chain is a conventional, unsealed unit that requires service. Lube it often with a good chain lube on about 30-60 minute intervals and keep the slack within the range specified in the owner's manual.

Before washing your bike, tape off the airbox vents and muffler outlet. Hose off the mud then spray the bike with 50% watered down Shout or Simple Green. I prefer Shout because it's cheaper and it will never etch the aluminum. SG can wreck anodized aluminum if you miss a spot rinsing off the bike. A power washer comes in handy here but keep it away from any seals as you can push water into bearings and that will wreck them. I like to use the power washer to blast all the dirt/grease out of the chain. Hold the powerwasher's tip about one inch away from each side of the links, spin the wheel and blast away. After washing the bike, remove the tape from the vents and muffler an ride the bike for a few minutes, if possible, to fling all the water from the chain. If you can't ride the bike, spray the chain liberally with WD40 to displace the water.

Air filter service ranges from 1-3 hours depending on the amount of dust you are riding in. You will need a gallon of Kerosene in a tub to soak the filter in. This will loosen the filter oil and dirt. Then, bathe the filter with warm soapy water in another tub. You will need 2-3 separate warm soapy water baths to get all the silt out of the filter, then bathe the filter in clear cold water to remove the soap. Squeeze as much water as possible out of the filter then hang it in a clean area and allow it to dry completely. Never wring the filter, only squeeze it.

Submerge the filter cage in the kerosene, then blow it off with compressed air. Do the same with the filter bolt. Clean the airbox spotlessly paying close attention to down inside the rubber air boot. If you drop dirt into the boot while reinstalling the filter, your engine will suffer. That's easy to do on this bike so make sure the entire airbox is spotless. A TwinAir airbox cover and WD40 make this job easier.

When the filter is completely dry, apply Bel-Ray or Maxima FFT filter oil liberally to the inside and outside of the filter. Disposable Nitrile rubber gloves are worth their weight in gold here. Work the oil into the filter by squeezing it around. Don't worry about over-oiling it. You want to make sure that every pore has oil so inspect the filter for dry areas and pore more oil on them and also around the rim area where the filter meets the airbox. Squeeze out as much excess, without wringing the filter, then use a few paper towels to blot out the last excess oil.

Now carefully reinstall the cage into the filter, and the filter into the airbox. See your owner's manual for the correct process to get the filter back in properly. It takes a little twist to get it in there. Once you have the entire rim of the filter fully seated into position, reinstall the holding screw and you are done with the hard part. If you wear the Nitile gloves all during this process, your hands will thank you.

Arghhh, now you are ready to get it dirty again and then repeat the process.

I always use TwinAir filtercleaner for my airfilters but don't know if that is neccesary.

It's easier to soak the airfilter completely in filter oil in a tub to make sure there isn't a spot left unoiled.

What oil you squeeze out you can use again.

Check your bike for loose bolts after first ride.

Cam pretty muched covered my maintenance process. Listen to it and you won't have any trouble.

nice info cam! you are the informer... for real!!

:thumbsup:

Thanks alot Cam, I'll definitely take your advice. As far as the tranny oil, you think I should replace that as well after break-in? I tightened my chain today for the first time and I noticed that there was some dirt trying to get in between the hub and swingarm. I cleaned it out but I was wondering if i should be lubing that area at all. I would also like to know if replacing my fork tube slider is necessary considering it says to do it in the manual after break-in. Should I be lubing the forks, rear swingarm and linkage or anything else after washing or just the chain as prescribed, or am I over thinking this. I just want to do everything I need to prevent repairs/replacements that i could of prevented if I had done things properly.

Thanks alot Cam, I'll definitely take your advice. As far as the tranny oil, you think I should replace that as well after break-in? I tightened my chain today for the first time and I noticed that there was some dirt trying to get in between the hub and swingarm. I cleaned it out but I was wondering if i should be lubing that area at all. I would also like to know if replacing my fork tube slider is necessary considering it says to do it in the manual after break-in. Should I be lubing the forks, rear swingarm and linkage or anything else after washing or just the chain as prescribed, or am I over thinking this. I just want to do everything I need to prevent repairs/replacements that i could of prevented if I had done things properly.

Change the tranny oil too after break in. Ride it, wash it, change the filter and oil and ride some more:ride: :thumbsup: That pretty much covers it at this point.:eek:

Check out Notoil filter cleaner with Notoil biodegradable oil and grease. Petroleum based filter oils are old school. Clean up maintenance is so much easier and non toxic. Highly recommended.

Thanks alot Cam, I'll definitely take your advice. As far as the tranny oil, you think I should replace that as well after break-in? I tightened my chain today for the first time and I noticed that there was some dirt trying to get in between the hub and swingarm. I cleaned it out but I was wondering if i should be lubing that area at all. I would also like to know if replacing my fork tube slider is necessary considering it says to do it in the manual after break-in. Should I be lubing the forks, rear swingarm and linkage or anything else after washing or just the chain as prescribed, or am I over thinking this. I just want to do everything I need to prevent repairs/replacements that i could of prevented if I had done things properly.

Yes, change the engine and tranny oils on the same intervals. Lube the chain between the inside and outside links. That's where it needs to go to migrate inside the actual bearing surfaces of the chain. You don't need to lube the forks, swingarm or linkage after washing. As long as you avoid those areas with high pressure water, you will be fine. One thing I forgot is that it is a good idea to spray the brake discs with contact cleaner to remove the cosmoline from the factory before you ride your new bike and remove any chain lube or WD40 over spray after servicing the bike.

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