jet kits

I'm getting an order ready. was just wondering which jet kitt is better for me

Bike is a stock 06 S. going to do 3*3 mod.

Never used the Dynojet kit, but I was very happy with the JD kit. I actually had already bought the hex head float bowl screws separately, and the JD kit had them already so I've got an extra set.

I chose it because from searching here it was described as the most complete of the available options.

jd kit is the more complete kit:thumbsup:

jd kit is the more complete kit

+2. You can order it right here from TT.

+3 on the JD kit. Do not forget the allen bolts for the bowel and a Kientech extended fuel screw

+3 on the JD kit. Do not forget the allen bolts for the bowel and a Kientech extended fuel screw

The JD kit I bought this week from TT came with the allen bolts in it. Is this not normal? They were a black finish with knurled heads, instead of the smooth stainless ones I bought from TT in a separate order (not knowing the jet kit had them).

Was mine a fluke, or is the JDS005 coming with the bowl screws now?

thankx all. had the same question about the allen bolts. I finnally got some xtra spending money. also going t o buy a few other things

Unabiker Radiator Guards - Suzuki DR-Z400S/SM 00-07 - Red

Suzuki DRZ 400E/S (00-08), Kawasaki KLX400 (03-05) - Ignition/Clutch

JD Jet Kit Suzuki DRZ400S/SM/E (CA Model) - Kawasaki KLX400SR (00-

DRZ FLDING SHIFT LVR MSR LONG

ThumperTalk DRZ400S Extended Fuel Mixture Screw by Kientech

mikuni Float Bowl Bolt Kit - Suzuki DRZ400S

You will be very happy w/ the 3x3 and JD. I can't believe how much easier it is to bring up the front now. Have fun man.

Another James Dean kit vote (Part # JDS005). Apparently it now comes w/ the allen head float bowl screws. I'd ask when you call to make sure. Get the Kientech extended fuel screw for the Mikuni as well.

Ah, James, that sneaky fellow. Taking care of the obvious. Not surprised he includes the screws. Another reason his product is superior. Now if we can just get him to include the fuel screw...... James, you reading this???

haha...a $4 set of mass produced bolts (which he probably gets a lot cheaper) is a lot easier to swallow than a $15 precision machined fuel screw, I don't see that happening without a price increase.

I have to admit I was surprised at how easily those stock philips head screws just crumbled. I thought I'd get them out being that the bike was a week old and they couldn't have been in there for very long.

I did manage to get one out without destroying it but the other three were completely destroyed.

I've been bitching for years about the inherent stupidity in the design of the philips head screw. I'm guessing his name was Phillips, but if not, whoever invented that thing had to have been either an idiot, or a genius that found pleasure in the misery of others. I mean come on, a driver that pushes itself out of the fastener with force proportional to the torque applied, and thereby reducing the contact area as torque increases?

Ah, James, that sneaky fellow. Taking care of the obvious. Not surprised he includes the screws. Another reason his product is superior. Now if we can just get him to include the fuel screw...... James, you reading this???

:thumbsup:

Hiya William. How goes it? :eek:

Very cool touch on James Dean's part if he's including the float bowl screws. I wonder if it's JD or TT that took that step.

I wouldn't be surprised if it was JD. As I mentioned before, the screws that came in the jetting kit are black with knurled heads, and the TT screws appear to be stainless steel with smooth heads. I would expect that if TT were putting the screws into the kits, they'd be the same screws they sell separately.

Sounds about right MesserSchmidt. :thumbsup:

I've been bitching for years about the inherent stupidity in the design of the philips head screw. I'm guessing his name was Phillips, but if not, whoever invented that thing had to have been either an idiot, or a genius that found pleasure in the misery of others. I mean come on, a driver that pushes itself out of the fastener with force proportional to the torque applied, and thereby reducing the contact area as torque increases?

I'm not overly fond of Mr. Phillips (Yes, that was his name) either. The problem is that they are designed to cam out, or to slip at a certain amount of torque so a fastener isn't over-tightened, which is not what you want them to do most of the time. I would guess in the proper application, it would work just dandy. In repeated applications of removal/installation, they reek.

I'm not overly fond of Mr. Phillips (Yes, that was his name) either. The problem is that they are designed to cam out, or to slip at a certain amount of torque so a fastener isn't over-tightened, which is not what you want them to do most of the time. I would guess in the proper application, it would work just dandy. In repeated applications of removal/installation, they reek.

That makes sense. With that purpose in mind, they should only be used in applications like indoor switch and outlet wallplates, computers, etc....stuff where they don't need to be torqued, just tight enough to not fall out.

IMO, it's use should be strictly forbidden in anything involving torque beyond what you can apply effortlessly with a screwdriver. CAR AND BIKE MANUFACTURERS, ARE YOU READING THIS???

I like Allen, though I've stripped out many of those as well. My personal favorite is Torx. I've never destroyed a torx bolt.

Torx is good. Square drive is good. Allen is good given the slot is deep enough. Anything but Phillips in high torque areas. :thumbsup:

Phillips work well if the screws are in good shape as well as the correct driver.

Hiya Stringburner!

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