Anybody want to go ride with a couple of newbies?

My friend and I are both new to bikes. I have lots of experiance on quads(don't worry I'm not the guy doing donuts in the Slash-X parking lot). My friend rode a tricycle once.

The truth is that we both suck. I'm very uncomfortable turning right and he can't turn left. Why is that? Seems that every time I turn right the front wheel washes out.

We went riding today From our houses in South Apple Valley and ended up in the snow and mud in Holcomb valley. That was not fun then we got on someones secret racetrack and were riding way over our heads.

Couple of guys on 2-strokes stopped to watch/laugh at us! Shook their heads and rode off. We had to cut that trail short and found our way back to 3N14.

Both of us have registered DS bikes. I have a KLR250 and Kenny has a DR350. We both have permits and insurance so we are legal on city streets and forestry roads.

Anyway if anybody in the Apple Valley area is interested in showing us some trails and how to get through them w/o fallin into a pond or cactus let me know.

Thx.

I don't live near you but the way to get better is practice, practice, practice. Just go out and have fun. The more you ride, the better you get. I just came off of a quad too and I'm loving the bike... I wish I would of put a twist throttle on the quad before I got a bike. It took some getting used too...

Head to Johnson Valley in Lucerne. Turn north on Camp Rock Road from 247 and then follow the signs. You can ride all over and there are some nasty and some mild trails. If you turn at the dirt road under the power lines off camp rock, you will go by Cougar Buttes, Head east to Soggy dry lake, some fun and pretty easy trails there. Good practice.

The first thing I do with a quad is to ditch the thumb throttle and put on a twist. Never understood why they have a thumb throttle.

So far I'm not happy with the bike. Maybe it's me or maybe I'm asking too much from the bike? I don't know but it sure is alot of work to keep it on a trail. Every little rock,slant or lump causes me to warble out of controll.

It does take some ride time.... But when it gets rough staned up....Turns its all about your posistion and ballance on the bike, if there tight turns then move your jewls up toward the gas tank...If you start getting bounced around or if you are going to atack some tuff stuff, set your self in an atack posistion and squize your legs tightly against the tank..

Its always about having fun...

Come up to Bishop and I'll show you some fun mellow stuff. Living in ca you really do need to learn how to ride sand and to turn. Try scooting foward onto the tank to put more weight on the front end. :eek::thumbsup:

What PSI are you running in your tires. This could be part of it.

hay i think i might have seen you guys.was one of you wearing a stret bike helmet

So far I'm not happy with the bike. Maybe it's me or maybe I'm asking too much from the bike? I don't know but it sure is alot of work to keep it on a trail. Every little rock,slant or lump causes me to warble out of controll.

If it was easy, what fun would it be? I've recently gotten back in the dirt after riding only on the street for many years. The dirt is a whole 'nuther world and my first several rides were spent really just learning to let the bike move around under me (that doesn't happen on the street) while staying loose. The last several rides have found me feeling much more confident and in control, although I still suck! Regardless, the challenge of learning this new skill and the very noticeable improvements I'm feeling are what makes this fun for me. I think you just need to go out and ride more and it will all start to come together.

Just get out and practice!!! Keep your elbows out and get up on the tank. The bikes gonna do what it wants at first so just get used to the way it moves and adjust to it. Check your tire pressure should be 15 to 18 lbs. And check your clickers your suspension may be too stiff

Just get out and practice!!! Keep your elbows out and get up on the tank. The bikes gonna do what it wants at first so just get used to the way it moves and adjust to it. Check your tire pressure should be 15 to 18 lbs. And check your clickers your suspension may be too stiff

I started with 22psi in the tires and have been deflating them as

I ride too see what happens. I'm down to 15psi now. I'm afraid of going any lower due to a pinchflat or pulling the valve stem out of the tube. I have my suspension cranked pretty tight and it still bottoms on small bumps.

Someone asked about a street helmet. No that was not us. We both have dirt helmets.

I started with 22psi in the tires and have been deflating them as

I ride too see what happens. I'm down to 15psi now. I'm afraid of going any lower due to a pinchflat or pulling the valve stem out of the tube. I have my suspension cranked pretty tight and it still bottoms on small bumps.

Someone asked about a street helmet. No that was not us. We both have dirt helmets.

Tire pressure is radically dependant on your bike, your weight, the tire being run, the type of tube, the terrain, how fast you ride, your level of agressiveness, your style, etc.

Personally, I'd rather die than run 18PSI up front. I consistantly run 10/10 to 12/12 and have never had a pinch flat in thousands of miles - even with a trials tire. No problems in the rockiest of terrain - ala:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=615449

if you're racing, that's a different story. A flat will quite possibly make you DNF, so running higher pressures is mandatory. For a newb, I'd definately run 10/10. It helps the tire stick so much better in the turns with less dependance on your body weight distribution being perfect.

Suspension is perhaps the most important part of your bike. Do not confuse the compression settings and the spring ratio. Each needs to be correct and although you can "fake" getting it better by changing one OR the other, getting both right for your weight, ability and terrain is essential for feeling comfortable, stable and going fast. I suggest a pro to set it up for you unless you like fiddling a lot.

I have a KLR250 and Kenny has a DR350.

Neither one of these bikes is a premium off road bike but should serve well as a starter bike. The KLR in particular seems to be marketed more for the low end or beginner off roader and so it probably (I don't know for certain as I have never ridden one) is set up a bit soft on the suspension side. Cranking the preload and/or damping adjustments up to the max won't help much if you and your buddy are quite a bit heavier than the setups are made for. Bill_P gave you good advice on tire pressure and suspension although a suspension pro may advise changing quite a few items that might make it expensive to get the suspension to be optimum. If so, ease up a bit, ride the bike the way it is until you decide it's time to upgrade the bike and get one better suited to your new abilities.

It's sounds to me that you just need a little more seat time and to work on your balance. Try to stick to the fire roads for a bit untill you get a better feel for what you and your bike are capable of. You guys should hook up with a local DS club for the day. Just show up and ride. :thumbsup:

I'd love to hook~up with you guys for a ride some time. Headed to Vegas next weekend but after that I'll be looking to ride.

Lot of info here, but one thing is for sure, start standing as much as possilble, it will allow the bike to move under you. Don't become a sit down rider, you can only go so fast sitting down. Learn to use your legs and transfer your weight on each peg, you can do a lot steering with weight shifts, and it's less tiring on the arms. Be patient, cause it's going to take time, maybe a year or two until you start getting confident and relaxed. Try and ride with better riders and pick up on their rythm.

Try and ride with better riders and pick up on their rythm.
Thats why I posted the thread here:smirk:

Try Gorman Ca. It has to open trails Powerline, and a fire road they are wide and fun and just like the rest of the guys said lots of seat time! Have fun.

Thats why I posted the thread here:smirk:

Not sure that post will win you any volunteers.

Neither one of these bikes is a premium off road bike but should serve well as a starter bike. The KLR in particular seems to be marketed more for the low end or beginner off roader and so it probably (I don't know for certain as I have never ridden one) is set up a bit soft on the suspension side. Cranking the preload and/or damping adjustments up to the max won't help much if you and your buddy are quite a bit heavier than the setups are made for. Bill_P gave you good advice on tire pressure and suspension although a suspension pro may advise changing quite a few items that might make it expensive to get the suspension to be optimum. If so, ease up a bit, ride the bike the way it is until you decide it's time to upgrade the bike and get one better suited to your new abilities.
Lot of info here, but one thing is for sure, start standing as much as possilble, it will allow the bike to move under you. Don't become a sit down rider, you can only go so fast sitting down. Learn to use your legs and transfer your weight on each peg, you can do a lot steering with weight shifts, and it's less tiring on the arms. Be patient, cause it's going to take time, maybe a year or two until you start getting confident and relaxed. Try and ride with better riders and pick up on their rythm.

this is the best advice. stand up ride to your abilitie. you will get more confidence with time.:thumbsup:

l remember when I first started to ride, a friend of mine had to start my bike for me. Embarassing! One good piece of advice I got was to point your soulders in the direction you want to go, then the rest of you will follow. Also ride with someone your own speed, it's more fun than eating some faster guy's dirt cookies and roostshake.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By KTMCASH
      Got the trailer loaded up rollin south for the prez weekend. Camping somewhere near Ridgecrest. What should I not miss being out this way? Doesn't happen very often. Im down for what's that stuff, I think you guys call it punishment. 
    • By Agr0
      So many threads on here about how people say it's really easy to do in an afternoon.  I have seen people post up "Hey Dave, bring it over to my house along with a case of mickey's and we'll bang it out one afternoon".  Well, I dont seem to have that luxury and I called ECC and was quoted $1500 parts & labor.  
      Does anyone have any recommendations on where to take it?  I'm technical as in replacing clutches, changing oil, transmission fluid, new sprockets, chains, even replace seals on forks, etc.  but never cracked an engine itself open
      I am in San Marcos.  Thanks.
    • By pessica
      Any insider tricks on ways to make my 2009 200 XC green sticker? 
    • By jamesm113
      Is it possible to ride from dove or jawbone to the piutes with a green or red sticker?
    • By BGD
      Has anyone ridden the Prosser trails in Truckee recently?  I'll be up in Truckee this weekend, but looks like skiing conditions will be crap.  I'm wondering if I should bring the Moto and ride instead.