Chain lube procedures..please help

Two quick questions for an o-ring chain.

Do I spray lube onto the chain when the ride is over to let it soak-in......or before a ride?

I also heard to lube while the chain is hot so it penetrates better. True?

Any thoughts?

What he said...

Only thing I can add is that I sometimes spray the lube into the chain guide. It's a more direct shot and the excess covers other parts of the chain rather than shooting through or dripping off.

Always WD-40 after the wash to remove the water. Later that day/night, spray the lube on the chain. Most likely, it won't be ridden for another day or week and the chain lube will have a chance to dry on the chain (which is what you want).

I prefer the Bel-Ray Chain Lube. Not the wax and not the "super-clean" crap.

I heard somewhere that WD-40 is no good for O-ring chains, being a penetrating oil, WD-40 will go into pre lubed O-ring compartments and will affect it.

is this true?

WD-40 is a no-no. I just wash then do a short spin on the street to rid the moving bits of water. Then I spray on some O-ring lube. It's all good.

I've been using white lithium spray grease for a year now. It's a good lubricant and seems to stay on well.

I've tried a lot of different lubricants for my chains over the years, but couldn't seem to find one that wouldn't attract and grab a representative microcosm of the area of woods I happened to be riding in that day. And grime build-up on any chain can severely shorten the lifespan of a drive combo.

I finally happened upon a couple of products that I've been using for about a year now, and they are just what the doctor ordered. They're referred to as "dry lubricant", the two I found are:

Gunk/Liquid Wrench Dry Lubricant,

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And 3-in-one brand High Performance Lubricant

3-in-onedrylube.gif

I've used both and they work great. They spray on wet, but dry quickly and leave no sticky residue to catch dirt, etc. And both are safe for seals, bushings, o-rings, etc. They are between $3 and $4 per can and I've found them at a couple of my local auto parts stores.:thumbsup:

It's a fact that wd-40 breaks down lubricants. That's why it works so well to remove decal residue.

It's a fact that wd-40 breaks down lubricants. That's why it works so well to remove decal residue.

It also displaces water (hence the WD part). After I wash my chain, I spray it with WD-40 to get the water off. I then RE-coat with a lubricant. I wouldn't be concerned if the WD-40 is breaking down the existing lubricant because I am replacing it with fresh lubricant anyway.

I ride in a dry climate so for me mud is never an issue. So what I do with my O-ring chain is run it dry. After I wash the bike, I blow it off including the chain with compressed air, then spray some WD40 on a rag and wipe the outside of the chain with it to prevent rust. If your chain is in good shape, why spray chain lube all over it? The O-rings keep the factory applied lube in and anything you spray on it out. Chain lube only makes dirt and sand stick to it and eat away at your O-rings which only shortens the life of the chain. If you must do something, take your masterlink apart, and relube the inside of it. It seems to be the only link to ever show any signs of not moving freely. By the way it's always a good idea to replace the clip whenever you take it apart. It works for me. Good luck to you.

I ride in a dry climate so for me mud is never an issue. So what I do with my O-ring chain is run it dry. After I wash the bike, I blow it off including the chain with compressed air, then spray some WD40 on a rag and wipe the outside of the chain with it to prevent rust. If your chain is in good shape, why spray chain lube all over it? The O-rings keep the factory applied lube in and anything you spray on it out. Chain lube only makes dirt and sand stick to it and eat away at your O-rings which only shortens the life of the chain. If you must do something, take your masterlink apart, and relube the inside of it. It seems to be the only link to ever show any signs of not moving freely. By the way it's always a good idea to replace the clip whenever you take it apart. It works for me. Good luck to you.

You are exactly right about the o and x ring chains. The rings seal the internal parts of the rollers, etc. and are lubed at assembly. The only reasons for lubing a ring-sealed chain are to provide some external friction reducing at the chain and sprocket's points of contact and to retard rust and corrosion-the WD evaporates so rapidly that I don't entirely trust it's rust prevention qualities past the first few minutes after application...but it is effective in grime removal that can't be removed even with a high-pressure spray. Or at least those are the reasons I apply the dry lube to mine-and it doesn't attract and hold dirt, etc. like the non-sling tacky chain lubes will.

Along those lines, the seals and internal lubricants of the o/x ring chains is what makes me leary of using much WD-40 on them. The WD is a petroleum distillate, which by nature will break down lubricants, it is also an excellent penetrant; which gives it a much higher probability of getting past the seals and breaking down the chain's internal lube. But if WD is what's being used, it's definitely safer for the chain if applied with a rag, rather than directly spraying the chain.

It's a fact that wd-40 breaks down lubricants. That's why it works so well to remove decal residue.

I stand my my post of a few years ago. The WD-40 lets the good lube ride on it to the insides of the pins. I don't have chain stretch problems. I ride moto 3 days/week. I run ERT2 chains only. I have no clue, nor do I car to have a clue about o/x ring chains - I just don't use 'em.

Whatever method you use, do it regularly. I see a lot of doofs that don't do squat to their chains and the next think you know, they're walking around the pits looking for a breaker or master link or lube or something else.

I stand my my post of a few years ago. The WD-40 lets the good lube ride on it to the insides of the pins. I don't have chain stretch problems. I ride moto 3 days/week. I run ERT2 chains only. I have no clue, nor do I car to have a clue about o/x ring chains - I just don't use 'em.

Whatever method you use, do it regularly. I see a lot of doofs that don't do squat to their chains and the next think you know, they're walking around the pits looking for a breaker or master link or lube or something else.

I agree on all points, Shifter. For the roller chains, I don't see any issues with using the WD. While it most likely will serve to 'float' the old lube out of the pins and rollers, it will also 'float' the new lube in behind it. My concerns over the use of WD is only for my x ring chains. I would hate to have one of my chain's life shortened because the new lube couldn't get past the rings as easily or consistently to replace the original lube. Probably like yourself, I would consider a chain stretching after initial break-in a failure on my part.

I also agree with the philosophy that the single most vital part is diligence with the maintenance.

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