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'08 wr 250f Headlight removal?

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Getting ready to put a yz #plate on my wr. Has anyone had issues removing the headlight? Anything special I need to know? Also replacing the rear fender. Any issues with that? Thanks!

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I posted a thread on this a while back. I had a YZ upper triple clamp and used it because the mounting for the YZ #plate. You will have to make something up otherwise. Make sure to disconnect the feed from the stator to the regulator so you won't fry the thing!

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I posted a thread on this a while back. I had a YZ upper triple clamp and used it because the mounting for the YZ #plate. You will have to make something up otherwise. Make sure to disconnect the feed from the stator to the regulator so you won't fry the thing!

why do you need to disconnect the regulator from the stator. I run my WR without a light all the time, nothing bad has happened. I put my light back on at night when i want to rider. but I may be lucky, so that is why I ask

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At one time there was a rash of rectifier failures when WR owners unhooked their lights. Maybe Yamaha upgraded the rectifier but why dump the voltage into the rectifier when your are not using it? Better safe than sorry I say.

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doesn't the regulator, regulate the power output of the stator, that way at high rpms, it doesn't make immense power. just like on a car. wouldn't that stop it from overproducing?

see, i ride at night, so I need to be able to plop it back in. thats why i was asking. it seems logical though. a whole, what .6 hp or something like that.

lol

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i used a switch from a yzf 450 atv, i use the slidding kill for the ignition switch in one , (then just deleted the kill switch), wired in the lights and start button, and i even connected the high beam wire. i checked the voltage at the battery with lights on ond off with no differance. i proubly have 20 hours with this set up including a continueous 2 hour hare scramble race without any problems. mayby im just lucky too?

wr4.jpg

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The regulator does NOT regulate the output of the stator, it regulates the power going INTO the other electrical components such as your battery charging system, etc. If you run your light directly on the output of the stator and rev the engine, it will fry the light filament, hence you have to go through a regulator so that the light bulb can get its 12 volts and not 18 volts (for example). The battery acts like a buffer/regulator for the output from the stator, so if you remove the battery, you would need to put something in its place to regulate the voltage in the wiring otherwise some components within the wiring will fry. Some people removed the battery and one of their regulator pieces fried since there was no buffer consuming the output of the stator - this is the problem dkwkid is talking about. I believe they sell a big capacitor that you need to put in place of the battery if you want to remove the battery on a WR. A WR's circuitry is different from a YZF since the WR's circuits is designed to charge a battery along with supplying power to front and rear lights.

If you have all of your components in place, removing the light (or turning it off) and running the bike will not harm anything - the system will regulate itself.

doesn't the regulator, regulate the power output of the stator, that way at high rpms, it doesn't make immense power. just like on a car. wouldn't that stop it from overproducing?

see, i ride at night, so I need to be able to plop it back in. thats why i was asking. it seems logical though. a whole, what .6 hp or something like that.

lol

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on a car, it cycles the alternator on and off depending on the power draw on the vehicle. like an ac pump. idk about bike though. that still makes sense.

do I have to worry about anything though.

The regulator does NOT regulate the output of the stator, it regulates the power going INTO the other electrical components such as your battery charging system, etc. If you run your light directly on the output of the stator and rev the engine, it will fry the light filament, hence you have to go through a regulator so that the light bulb can get its 12 volts and not 18 volts (for example). The battery acts like a buffer/regulator for the output from the stator, so if you remove the battery, you would need to put something in its place to regulate the voltage in the wiring otherwise some components within the wiring will fry. Some people removed the battery and one of their regulator pieces fried since there was no buffer consuming the output of the stator - this is the problem dkwkid is talking about. I believe they sell a big capacitor that you need to put in place of the battery if you want to remove the battery on a WR. A WR's circuitry is different from a YZF since the WR's circuits is designed to charge a battery along with supplying power to front and rear lights.

If you have all of your components in place, removing the light (or turning it off) and running the bike will not harm anything - the system will regulate itself.

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i used a switch from a yzf 450 atv, i use the slidding kill for the ignition switch in one , (then just deleted the kill switch), wired in the lights and start button, and i even connected the high beam wire. i checked the voltage at the battery with lights on ond off with no differance. i proubly have 20 hours with this set up including a continueous 2 hour hare scramble race without any problems. mayby im just lucky too?

wr4.jpg

thats a very nice looking WR, I have the vapor tach as well. how did your mount like that, I have mine running off the handlebar with the included mount

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on a car, it cycles the alternator on and off depending on the power draw on the vehicle. like an ac pump. idk about bike though. that still makes sense.

do I have to worry about anything though.

On a car, I believe the alternator is ALWAYS on (just like our bikes) and outputting power, the circuitry will allow the charging of the battery or not and how much power gets to the battery and other components (hence the regulator). If you look under your car's hood, you'll see that the alternator is ALWAYS turning since it is hooked up to a belt, hence it is always producing power, how that power is harvested is up to the circuitry of the car.

As for your bike, if you have all of your stock electrical components in place, running without the head light & tail light or with them turned off won't hurt the bike's circuitry. If you remove any of the stock electrical components, THEN you NEED to worry about how the circuit will behave to ensure that nothing will break/fry.

The other thing people need to worry about is not putting too much of a "draw" on their stator/coil or it can break/fry - this is why we have fuses. If you add too much of a draw on the stator such as lights that require more wattage, then the circuitry must be checked to ensure that it can handle the extra load. That's why they sell kits for our bikes, an electrical engineer has already figured out the load for the various components in that kit.

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I'm sorry, here is a little background. UUC races bmw's, I buy alot of there products. there nice. read the part about the alternator, found this when I bought the under drive pulleys.

http://uucmotorwerks.com/

go, to BMW, engine performance, ultimate underdrive pulleys, technical data. they have dyno proved there point.

I'm just relaying info I found.

so if i take my head light and rear light off, it will be fine. but if i remove the battery and it has nothing to charge, then i'm SOL

On a car, I believe the alternator is ALWAYS on (just like our bikes) and outputting power, the circuitry will allow the charging of the battery or not and how much power gets to the battery and other components (hence the regulator). If you look under your car's hood, you'll see that the alternator is ALWAYS turning since it is hooked up to a belt, hence it is always producing power, how that power is harvested is up to the circuitry of the car.

As for your bike, if you have all of your stock electrical components in place, running without the head light & tail light or with them turned off won't hurt the bike's circuitry. If you remove any of the stock electrical components, THEN you NEED to worry about how the circuit will behave to ensure that nothing will break/fry.

The other thing people need to worry about is not putting too much of a "draw" on their stator/coil or it can break/fry - this is why we have fuses. If you add too much of a draw on the stator such as lights that require more wattage, then the circuitry must be checked to ensure that it can handle the extra load. That's why they sell kits for our bikes, an electrical engineer has already figured out the load for the various components in that kit.

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I'm sorry, here is a little background. UUC races bmw's, I buy alot of there products. there nice. read the part about the alternator, found this when I bought the under drive pulleys.

http://uucmotorwerks.com/

go, to BMW, engine performance, ultimate underdrive pulleys, technical data. they have dyno proved there point.

I'm just relaying info I found.

I can't find the tech spec or whatever it is that you're trying to point out...

What does a pulley have to do with the alternator being on or off? The pulley pulls the belt that drives the alternator. If the alternator is turning, it is making electricity. What is your point? :excuseme: :excuseme:

so if i take my head light and rear light off, it will be fine. but if i remove the battery and it has nothing to charge, then i'm SOL

Your lights are connected to a switch, when that switch is off, the system doesn't know if there are any lights in the circuit - so yes, keep the light switch off and remove your lights, no problem.

If you remove the battery to save weight, make sure to buy the capacitor piece that they sell to take the battery's place. :confused:

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What switch are you talking about?

I noticed on my 07 WR, you can remove the headlight by simply unplugging something right behind the light. on my 04, i am trying to replace the headlight with a YZ # plate, but i dont exactly know where the right place is to unplug it, and it looks like i need to unwrap a bunch of taped up wires to get the headlight wire separate. do i unplug it under the tank?

Also, where is the wire i should disconnect that goes from the stator to the regulator so i dont waste that small amount of energy when there's no headlight?

Ive already removed the tail light, is there anything i should unplug to make not have any wasted energy for that?

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What switch are you talking about?

My 02 had a switch to turn the lights off/on. Not sure what the newer models have to control the lights - are the lights always on? If there is a switch that turns your lights on/off, put that switch in the off position. If you remove that switch then make sure the wiring keeps the circuit open (i.e., that would be the same as if the switch is in the off position).

I noticed on my 07 WR, you can remove the headlight by simply unplugging something right behind the light. on my 04, i am trying to replace the headlight with a YZ # plate, but i dont exactly know where the right place is to unplug it, and it looks like i need to unwrap a bunch of taped up wires to get the headlight wire separate. do i unplug it under the tank?

Unwrap the tape and unplug the wire by the light. You'll need to do that anyway to remove the light. Once the light is removed, make sure the switch is off or the circuit is not putting voltage to those wires (tape them up so that they don't short).

Also, where is the wire i should disconnect that goes from the stator to the regulator so i dont waste that small amount of energy when there's no headlight?

Ive already removed the tail light, is there anything i should unplug to make not have any wasted energy for that?

There is nothing to "waste", the stator will make the electricity anyway when it turns (as the engine turns), if there is nothing to consume the electricity that the stator creates (such as lights), then it's no big deal. The circuitry will deal with the excess electricity - no worries.

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the pulleys would underdrive the alternator, reducing parasitic drag on engine parts. but this racing team says it doesn't matter. thats how I know that

component examination

pulley?

Alternator There is a lot of speculation about the operation of the charging system in your BMW. Let's skip straight to the facts: an alternator does not constantly produce current. Like the A/C compressor, it cycles on and off as demand goes up and down. The battery buffers it from the electrical demands of the car, and it only works enough to maintain system voltage. Underdriving the alternator would have ramifications ranging from dim lights at idle, to insufficient charging ability, and potentially as far as damage to your BMW's voltage-sensitive components. It may also cause inconveniences in the operation of your aftermarket electronic devices and ICE. Additionally, the automatic voltage regulator adjusts how much the alternator is working, effectively making an underdrive pulley for the alternator worthless. For this reason, UUC has deemed that any gains made with a replacement alternator pulley will not be due to reducing its RPM.

Power Steering The hydraulic power for the steering is provided by a rotary-vane pump, which is a type of positive-displacement pump. By definition, positive-displacement pumps displace a known quantity of liquid with each revolution of the pumping elements. For this application, the pump has been designed to provide adequate flow when the engine is idling. As a result, the pump moves much more fluid than necessary when the engine is running at faster speeds. Underdriving it by a reasonable percentage will yield no perceptible change in power steering assist, but will free up power that is lost to shaft vibration and fluid cavitations.

Water pump The fluid drag of a centrifugal pump, such as the water pump, does not increase linearly with RPM. Rather, the load will increase by the square of the pump's rotational speed. This means that the pump's power consumption will rise at a more rapid rate than engine speed. The more you decrease the pump's RPM, the gains also decrease. UUC has struck the balance of power gain and pump efficiency with our underdrive pulley for the water pump.

Air conditioning The operation of the A/C compressor is cyclic. Depending on various RPM and temperature conditions, it will cycle on and off with varying frequency. Either way, the same amount of work is done to cool the car's interior. Underdriving the A/C compressor would not yield any gains, or any discomforts. UUC has chosen not to supply an underdrive pulley for the compressor for this reason.

Crank pulley Also called the "main pulley", this drives all the other pulleys. By changing the size of just this pulley, all the other pulleys would effectively be underdriven. While this would seem like a simpler method, there are two significant problems: As explained above, not every accessory reacts well to being underdriven. Additionally, the crankshaft pulley is also the the tuned harmonic damper. The crankshaft on your inline six is subject to a wide variety of vibrations and harmonic phenomenon, and the damper incorporates an elastomeric component to protect the crankshaft from harmful effects of these forces. The risk of removing the harmonic damper is catastrophic failure of the crankshaft.

I pasted it for you.

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Thanks for all the replies. I got the light off no problem. Question now is-how to attatch a yz number plate without changing to a yz triple clamp? Anyone got any good pics?

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Also, I like my speedometer. Any way to keep it and still do the yz # plate?

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the pulleys would underdrive the alternator, reducing parasitic drag on engine parts. but this racing team says it doesn't matter. thats how I know that

component examination

pulley?

Alternator There is a lot of speculation about the operation of the charging system in your BMW. Let's skip straight to the facts: an alternator does not constantly produce current. Like the A/C compressor, it cycles on and off as demand goes up and down. The battery buffers it from the electrical demands of the car, and it only works enough to maintain system voltage. Underdriving the alternator would have ramifications ranging from dim lights at idle, to insufficient charging ability, and potentially as far as damage to your BMW's voltage-sensitive components. It may also cause inconveniences in the operation of your aftermarket electronic devices and ICE. Additionally, the automatic voltage regulator adjusts how much the alternator is working, effectively making an underdrive pulley for the alternator worthless. For this reason, UUC has deemed that any gains made with a replacement alternator pulley will not be due to reducing its RPM.

Thanks for posting the text. What they say above doesn't make much sense without telling us how the alternator turns on and off. If it's turning, it's producing electricity and SOMETHING in the circuitry is keeping the electicity from getting to the battery and other components - so what they're saying makes no sense to me.

If you watch the A/C compressor, it has a clutch on it that turns it on/off depending on the demand so it this case the clutch is keeping the A/C compressor from working. All of the car alternators that I have seen don't have any clutch on it to turn it off/on, they are always turning with the belt.

Underdriving the pulley system just means that they are changing the size of the pulley so that the alternator isn't turning as much - just like changing sprocket sizes. I believe that as long as the pulley is turning the belt and the belt is turning the alternator, the coil inside the alternator should be producing electricity. I don't understand how a regulator can tell the coil how much current to make, as the coil turns, it physically has to produce electricity. I always thought the regulator regulates the current/voltage that goes to various components from the alternator so what they say doesn't make sense. Any Electronic Engineer in the house that can clarify this?

Where's William1? He seems to know quite a bit about cars, maybe he can clear this alternator thing up for us... :confused:

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