Who's side is COHVCO on?

Don't bother sending me a renewal notice.:confused: The real kicker is the change from open unless signed to closed unless signed open. The end is near folks, your kids won't have anywhere to ride. How does it go? With friends like these who needs SUWA etc.

Subject: DOW Officers to Enforce Motorized Vehicle Regulations on Federal Land

DOW OFFICERS TO ENFORCE MOTORIZED VEHICLE REGULATIONS ON FEDERAL LAND

Colorado Division of Wildlife (DOW) officers will now be enforcing motorized vehicle regulations on federal public lands as specified in Colorado House Bill 1069.

This bill, introduced in January of this year, was signed by Gov. Bill Ritter on March 20.

The measure specifies that DOW officers along with other state law enforcement officers will now be able to enforce motorized vehicle restrictions on public lands. Officers can now issue tickets in the field to those who violate motorized vehicle laws.

"Our officers will certainly use substantial discretion during the early stages in carrying out this enforcement. It's going to take some time to get signs in place and for people to have access to updated maps and information," said Rob Firth, Chief of Law Enforcement for the Colorado DOW. "We recognize that motorized vehicles have a substantial role in enhancing outdoor recreation in many areas of the state. This legislation gives us the ability to act when it comes to the most blatant violators such as when sensitive habitat is harmed or when hunters or outdoor enthusiasts have their activities interfered with by those who knowingly violate the regulations in place."

Enforcement will be incidental, as the DOW will not be adding any new officers or resources to specifically enforce this regulation. DOW officers will issue citations in conjunction with carrying out their current duties.

Penalties established for those who violate these regulations include a misdemeanor charge and a fine of $100. If the violation occurs while a person is hunting, fishing or trapping, 10 suspension points would also be assessed against their hunting/fishing privileges.

A person who commits a violation in a federal wilderness area would be charged with a misdemeanor and face a stiffer penalty, including a $200 fine and 15 license suspension points.

Anyone caught removing, destroying or defacing any sign related to motorized vehicle regulations will be charged with a misdemeanor and face a $100 fine. A penalty of 5 suspension points would be assessed to their hunting or fishing license.

All fines can be sent through the mail, and no court appearance is necessary unless otherwise requested by the defendant.

Ranchers, law enforcement officers and others with the authorization to operate a motor vehicle on federal public land are exempt from these regulations.

"This bill is the result of many people coming together in an effort to preserve public lands in Colorado. It addresses the growing problem of unauthorized motor vehicle use in prohibited areas and we look forward to assisting federal agencies in enforcement on public lands," said Tom Remington, Director of the Division of Wildlife.

Supporters of this bill include: State Representative Kathleen Curry (D-Gunnison) who sponsored the bill in the house, State Senator Lois Tochtrop (D-Thornton) who sponsored the bill in the senate, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, the Colorado Wildlife Federation, Trout Unlimited, the Colorado Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition, the Colorado Mountain Club, Colorado Counties Inc., the Colorado Bow Hunters Association, and other local and national organizations.

Additional Information: For photos of Gov. Ritter signing this bill, please contact Tyler Baskfield.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

To opt out of future emails please visit http://wildlife.state.co.us/NewsMedia/DOWInsider/remove.asp?userid=25792&email=wblack8709@msn.com.

I don't understand your angst. One of the major problems facing OHV users is the few idiots out there that spoil a whole bunch of good riding areas. What this law does is allows for the enforcement of existing laws. No riding areas were taken away. I will use the Uncompaghre Plateau as a good example.

Almost every encounter on the Plateau is with law abiding riders. The few idiots that pushed the atv trail into the Aspen loop have ruined a great trail. If there was some law enforcement presence to prevent this behavior a mediocre trail would be a great trail. I don't want to see an "Orwellian State", but a little extra law enforcement wouldn't hurt. I know here in the North Desert in GJ nearly all the motorcross bikes are without spark arrestors and half of those have expired or non-existent OHV tags. I see Game wardens more often than I see any other law enforcement in the backcountry.

Don't get me started on the out of state hunters that blaze a trail to their kill on an ATV because they were too lazy to pack it out on foot. Packing out is part of hunting.

Regards,

Thomas

I don't understand your angst. One of the major problems facing OHV users is the few idiots out there that spoil a whole bunch of good riding areas. What this law does is allows for the enforcement of existing laws. No riding areas were taken away. I will use the Uncompaghre Plateau as a good example.

Almost every encounter on the Plateau is with law abiding riders. The few idiots that pushed the atv trail into the Aspen loop have ruined a great trail. If there was some law enforcement presence to prevent this behavior a mediocre trail would be a great trail. I don't want to see an "Orwellian State", but a little extra law enforcement wouldn't hurt. I know here in the North Desert in GJ nearly all the motorcross bikes are without spark arrestors and half of those have expired or non-existent OHV tags. I see Game wardens more often than I see any other law enforcement in the backcountry.

Don't get me started on the out of state hunters that blaze a trail to their kill on an ATV because they were too lazy to pack it out on foot. Packing out is part of hunting.

Regards,

Thomas

+1 :confused:

DF I'm with you, while this particular issue I don't have a lot of pain over, they are supporting things in the wrong direction, pushing the 96 DB limit and getting nothing in return. I will not join COHVCO unless it is required for an event. The NRA followed their same line of thinking in the mid 90's, they lost members over it, and changed course and gained members back again. Lets hope COHVCO learns before to much is lost. For the record I had to join last year, event mandated, and I also sent in $100 to the BRC.

Tell you what folks, I really hope you are right. And in five years or so we will see how this has gone down. Here are a couple of my issues though.

I never said we lost trails due to this bill. Here are 4 groups that are working on taking Colorado's +-14% of federal wilderness land to somewhere around 48%. The DOW will just be the one to enforce that. Why? Because all these groups do so much to fund wilderness that the fed's can't do it themselves. Do they pay 25.25 a year to hike on "our public land".

1

The Citizens' Wilderness Proposal

The 1.6 million-acre Citizens' Wilderness Proposal (CWP) would permanently protect 1.3 million acres of Colorado wildlands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), as well as roughly 300,000 acres of adjacent Forest Service lands. The CWP would protect as wilderness 60 special places across Colorado, primarily on the West Slope, including many low- to mid-elevation lands that provide essential wildlife habitat and outstanding backcountry recreation opportunities. This comprehensive proposal is embodied in legislation sponsored by Representative Diana DeGette (H.R. 2305). Wilderness designation is the best way to protect Colorado's wildlands while allowing other multiple uses such as hiking, skiing, livestock grazing, hunting, and fishing. Currently, over 85 percent of the BLM lands in Colorado are open to oil and gas development, while only 1.7 percent is protected as wilderness. The CWP would increase the amount of protected BLM lands to 17 percent, still leaving the vast majority of BLM land open to extractive uses. Over 360 local governments, businesses, and recreation, faith-based and conservation organizations have endorsed the protection of lands in the CWP. Specific legislative initiatives are also being crafted for several individual areas within the CWP, including Deep Creek, Browns Canyon, and Dominguez Canyon.

2

ROCC is currently working to get local support for the proposed Whitehouse Expansion of the Mt. Sneffels Wilderness Area (see details below). The area under consideration consists of approximately 16,000 acres north and east of Mount Sneffels and is already managed as “wilderness” by the US Forest Service. Federal legislation designating this area as Wilderness will provide permanent protection of this incredible, signature landscape of Ouray County.

3

http://www.whiteriverwild.org/white-river-national-forest.php

4

http://www.ccwcwilderness.org/maps/mapoverall.html

Now why do I see my money being thrown in support with groups I consider the enemy?

Talk to me about the plateau when we see the new travel management plan approved. I have no doubt the dry creek area I grew up goofing off in will loose access. Or take peach valley, lots of money for silly pole fencing and a parking/picnic area that will only draw more people, which will be more use, which will result in more restrictions. Or my favorite, how about spending almost a million dollars to build a bridge for access to a wilderness study area????

I totally agree on packing meat out. Why not a bill to change that?

The Orwellian State is here. They chip a little bit away everytime we let them pass something like this. It's like that story about boiling a frog slowly, we go right along thinking it's fine. They didn't take any riding area's right?

Finally COHVCO is supposed to be spending my money educating those few idiots causing the problem not spending it throwing in with sierra club on more folks to stop me to see if my papers are in order.

I think everyone should read the bill.

http://www.leg.state.co.us/CLICS/CLICS2008A/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/D508774ECCE5E987872573680057F5C0?Open&file=1069_enr.pdf

I am of the oppinion that we are far from an Orwellian state. We still have the right to vote and dissent. We have the bill of rights. There is no "Thought Police" (yet).

Rep Degette is cosponsor of H.R.1919 Red Rock Wilderness Garbage. H.R.2305 is (Energy Conservation through `Smart Meters' Act of 2007') I understand what you meant though. I have writen Udall, Perlmutter, and Degette about their despicable behavior. At least Salazar has not cosponsored any of this crap legislation.

With the new bill set to take effect on July 1, 2008 there will be some changes seen right away. Local law enforcement will be able to head out the the local riding areas and check permits and have a presence. The Libertarian in me hates government interference, but sometimes it is a necessary. (lp.org) It is a joke to think one or two BLM rangers can patrol a 2 million acre area (Grand Junction Field Office) I think we will benefit from this legislation by promoting an enforcement presence. People that habitually break the law will find something else to do.

Regards,

Thomas

And what happens when those wilderness minded Law officers start writing tickets and YOU have to prove you could not tell where you were because of crapy maps or non-existant signing. Until the maps and signage BOTH match and are where they need to be this is nothing but "ticket first, ask questions later" YOU still have to go through the hassle of going to court and PROVING yourself right... regardless if you're right! If you get hassled enough when you go out, doing your best to obey the laws and you STILL get hassled because the wilderness minded LEO doesn't mind writing tickets YOU WILL STOP GOING OUT. ITS not worth the hassle of going to court all the time! They win, you lose. THAT ALL THIS LAW DOES. It will not stop anything and you've move youself closer to thinking like the AANs. Good job COHVCO, BRC. Some law officers are good and true. But how many of you remember the LEO over in Moab a few years ago who did nothing but try to close things that were not closed and harassing motorized users any time he could? Have you forgotten already?

Are'nt any COHVCO reps also TTer's? It would be interesting to hear from Dennis Larrett or someone else from COHVCO. Dennis Larett is an awesome rider and obviously loves dirt bikes so I wonder if this is some sort of compromise.

I just about got my head bit off when I asked if they were closing RR one trail at a time.

its a slow painful death

This definitly does not sound like the direction we'd like it to go but in case you have'nt seen this , here's COHVCO's explanation. http://cohvco.org/?p=46

Your right no riding areas are being taken away with this bill. That is all happening currently under the travel management plans. This bill is simply a means of enforcing those plans the forthcoming maps, the new rules and regulations and all the trail closures that they will contain. I'm certain there will be an outcry from users when they see what they have lost, many (self included) of whom abide by the current regs. will simply say f_ _ k it and continue to ride those closed trails. The DOW will attempt to put a quick end to these renegades in an effort to keep the entire flock from going astray. It will be interesting to see how much effort the government puts into keeping us from our lands in comparison to keeping illegals from our country. I don't think you need to read the bill to invision whats coming or to determine that this is just the begining. To inforce the travel management plan they will need more money, this most certainly will come from us. New license and user fees along with restrictions will become the order of the day, heavy use will eventually require even more limitations and increases in fees. One day when I go to ride those bookcliffs in Grand Junction I will find that we will all have to park in one designated lot which inturn will require a daily fee. When paying the fee at the gate an officer will greet me and check to see that I have all the appropriate permits and licenses and that my bike meets all the regs including a sound limit test, that my motor size is within the legal limit of 50cc and that my tires are DOT approved. He will then inform me I must stay on the paved trail, that passing is not allowed and that exceeding a max speed of 10 mph is subject to a fine, and then politely says "have a nice day"! After an hour or so of riding at this exhilirating pace, I come to a rest area complete with covered benches that provide a little relief from the sun, I stop to get a drink and sit in the shade, a young family shares the rest area with me and I hear the little boy tell his dad "thanks for bringing me here this is so much fun"! I look up at a place once known as skinny ridge and reflect on the good times we once had here, a tear emits from my eye as I come to understand these words of my dad "I may be old but I'm glad I was born when I was, you kids don't know what your missing"!

Yes it's a simple law but I'm affraid things are about to change and at a much quicker rate then we could ever imagine! I think of those fake deer the DOW uses now to catch pochers and wonder what they'll dream up to get us?:confused:

Your right no riding areas are being taken away with this bill. That is all happening currently under the travel management plans. This bill is simply a means of enforcing those plans the forthcoming maps, the new rules and regulations and all the trail closures that they will contain. I'm certain there will be an outcry from users when they see what they have lost, many (self included) of whom abide by the current regs. will simply say f_ _ k it and continue to ride those closed trails. The DOW will attempt to put a quick end to these renegades in an effort to keep the entire flock from going astray. It will be interesting to see how much effort the government puts into keeping us from our lands in comparison to keeping illegals from our country. I don't think you need to read the bill to invision whats coming or to determine that this is just the begining. To inforce the travel management plan they will need more money, this most certainly will come from us. New license and user fees along with restrictions will become the order of the day, heavy use will eventually require even more limitations and increases in fees. One day when I go to ride those bookcliffs in Grand Junction I will find that we will all have to park in one designated lot which inturn will require a daily fee. When paying the fee at the gate an officer will greet me and check to see that I have all the appropriate permits and licenses and that my bike meets all the regs including a sound limit test, that my motor size is within the legal limit of 50cc and that my tires are DOT approved. He will then inform me I must stay on the paved trail, that passing is not allowed and that exceeding a max speed of 10 mph is subject to a fine, and then politely says "have a nice day"! After an hour or so of riding at this exhilirating pace, I come to a rest area complete with covered benches that provide a little relief from the sun, I stop to get a drink and sit in the shade, a young family shares the rest area with me and I hear the little boy tell his dad "thanks for bringing me here this is so much fun"! I look up at a place once known as skinny ridge and reflect on the good times we once had here, a tear emits from my eye as I come to understand these words of my dad "I may be old but I'm glad I was born when I was, you kids don't know what your missing"!

Yes it's a simple law but I'm affraid things are about to change and at a much quicker rate then we could ever imagine! I think of those fake deer the DOW uses now to catch pochers and wonder what they'll dream up to get us?:confused:

I think the general theme here is that enforcement of the law is not a bad thing. The Federal government is moving to make trails closed unless otherwise signed open. I remember riding Rampart Range and seeing what all the quadtards did to push into what WAS good singletrack. There are plenty of other open areas for quads, why do they need to push into good singletrack?

Much of the BLM land is open travel management. This means that currently one does not need to be on a trail unless the area is designated as such. New travel management plans are going to change all this.

It is hard for me to put this into words, but I hear what everyone is saying. If I can paraphrase it it would go something like this: "Enforcing trail regulations is not bad. Using blanket closures to manage areas is despicable". I hope I got that right.

I hope everyone takes the time to write their representative. If you live in the Front Range (Denver Area) your rep Dianna Degette has done more to take away your(our) access than any other member of congress from Colorado. Udall is a close second. The biggest effect we can have on our access is to vote out these idiots. Remember they are elected to 2 year terms. This is where we can have the most political impact to protect our interests. I know many wrote letters on TT letter writing day. Please take the time to write your rep in congress. Vote against them if necessary. Just vote!

Regards,

Thomas

"The bill, if signed into law, is automatically repealed in 5 years"

If the new legislation fails this is what we get.

Regards,

Thomas

I agree that one should stay on designated trails, however every day there are fewer and fewer of these trails with more and more users. The issue of overuse then appears, another closed trail. Seems like a losing battle. Ah, for the good old days of the 3 color tavel maps.

when i noticed the co. bowhunters support i know ther true intent of this bill. however i understand cloud9 very well. some of the dow officers dont know whats what and yes FS just closes off roads-trails even though they have been on maps designated as public roads for over 60 years.

my big gripe is this, nobody can use them but if big business wants to they can build an entire network of roads to do whatever they want. the gen public gets hosed and the dow, fs etc.. are there to make sure of it.

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