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Flywheel question (don't laugh too hard)

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Thankfully, I've never had to bust the bike down enough to actually see the flywheel (yet) and I can't determine by looking at internet pics if this is even possible....so, I'm wondering if anyone's tried to lighten the stock flywheel, whether it be from being milled down to punching lightening holes in it? As always, I'm trying to be a do-it-yourself'er and save a buck or two where I can (sorry TT, Uncle Sam doesn't pay too well!) and being that I've access to a machine shop, thought it might be something to look into. Was just wondering if it could be done and, if so, what were the results. Cool! :thumbsup:

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i am new to the drz world and havent yet looked at our flywheel but have seen many many others (as being a pervious buke mechanic) and it does seem then you could throw it up on a mill and bore a few maybe 3/8 to 1/2" holes in it. i am also a machinist. the only thing i think you wont like is how easy it will be to stall at low rpm slow manuvers. im sure ill get used to it and wont think twice but just trying to creep over a curb and nor rev the piss outta it seemed a little tricky, and with having that said, the engine will be easier to stall. also it might be diferent for you with having a larger sprocket on the rear. but i do think it is possible as long as you know what your doing on the mill. id sugest not clamping it too hard as you might loosen the stator magnets or throw it out of round.

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No sorry, afraid not. The way the flywheel is made, there is no place to machine off material. For it to do any good, the material has to come off the outside diameter (polar moment) and you just can't take it there without it becoming unstable and flying apart. I would not machine any flywheel.

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If you do a search you will find someone has had the flywheel lightened but by a professional service that does this type of thing...It needs to be done very accurately to avoid out of balance problems...

I'm using the Trailtech flywheel (Second Gen)...

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Yeah, I saw the Trail Tech flywheel in the TT store. Of course I want to have it, but thought maybe something could be done to the stock one to save $$. Point taken though, I won't mess with the stock one. Thanks fellas!

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both of the stock flywheels i have dealt with that were lightened were basically ruined.

the chucked them in the lathe by the threaded portion that you need to use the puller on.

guess what happens the next time you need to get the flywheel off and the puller wont thread on?

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I just installed a Trail Tech flywheel on my drz and I did notice a difference. It's not a HUGE difference, but enough to where I was happy that I bought it. I have not noticed it being easier to stall though. It revs up pretty quick, the only thing that I have noticed is riding at freeway speeds, it seems it doesn't want to accelerate as fast from say 70mph and up, but still hits the top speed. Less rotating mass I guess, plus I am 210lbs :thumbsup:

I currently have the 3x3 mod, K&N filter, Dynojet kit installed, the trailtech flywheel, and a Yoshimura RS3 full S.S. I think next on my list of things to do is either a bore kit, or cams. Only due to affordability. Would love the FCR, but just can't do the $500 bite as of yet. Stupid recession!

Anyway, get the flywheel. It's one of the cheaper motor mods you can do and you will notice a difference. Plus you're probably going to end up getting one anyway just like I will end up getting a big bore kit, FCR, Turbo, supercharger, NOS and...:thumbsup::confused:

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