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steering stem bearings,harder than swing arm bolt!!

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:lol::ride: I changed out my steering stem bearings,and it was way harder than taking out my swing arm bolt!!,it even took longer!,No joke,OK,getting to them was childs play,you remove your front tire,and slide out your forks,about 10 minutes,remove handle bars,lay over to the side,cables still attached,pop off top triple,and stem comes out from the bottom,no problem,getting the old bearing off,man,this is a joke!,I ended up grinding it paper thin in one spot,and knocking it off with a hammer and good sharp chisel, NOTE!!without boogering up the steering stem!!,you need the patience of a saint on this part! Next,getting the new bearing on,I guess you should press the stem out,from the bottom,right?Wrong!it presses out from the top down,dont make this mistake,but before I tried to press it out,I looked in my Clymer,and it said the bearing just slides down,from the top of the stem,so I got to looking at it,and it gets thicker just after the threads,,I slid the new bearing on,and it stops at the thicker portion of the stem,so I looked back at the clymer,it says nothing about pressing anything,just a diagram of the parts going on over the stem,so I put some force on it with just my hands,and it moved!,Hmm,ok,so I got a tire iron,and set it on the ring,not the bearing holder,and started tapping,and it got past the first thicker junction really easy,but this is where the fun stops,getting it to seat down snug against the bottom triple clamp,thats another story,Oh,did you remember to put on your bottom dust seal??,yes,I put it on first,it goes right in place,great,next,is where you may want to go take a valium,and consume a strong beverage of your choice,cuz,your in for some fun, Remember,I didnt as much as scratch the stem shaft itself,this is where you need to take caution,its very easy to muck it up,so I just tapped it on one side,and back to the other,over,and over,Its 2.45, got to go pick up my youngest daughter from school,Oh yeah,well you aint got me whipped yet!was my thoughts,so I went and got her, opened up a fresh can of copenhagen,and then back to work,I used a tire iron,cuz its got that curve on the end,and fit just right to tap it on with,you may have another weapon of choice,what ever works,Right!so after a while,it was in place,after that,its all she wrote!!,you just put it back together, and grease the hell out of it but,dam,Honda makes sure us home mechanics have some fun in the process!!:mad::bonk:;) TIP..Use high temp grease for these bearings,the steering head gets good and warm from the oil being in the frame at this area,regular grease will get hot,and spooge out on to your fender,and we dont want that,do we?:rant::thumbsup::D:eek::o

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If you will use high temp waterproof grease like for boat trailor bearings it will alleviate the rust that forms and degrades those bearings as well.

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great going guys :ride:

i also noticed a bit of play in my steering stem bearings and will be replacing them pretty soon...high temp waterproof grease it is :thumbsup:

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Is bellray waterproof grease okay for this. I use it on everything else.

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This is my new favorite grease for these challenging applications:

11404.jpg

I got that can for $4 at Home Depot.

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Excellent Porterdog,if it says trailer wheel bearing,then it has to be a good product,the only trailer people actually back down into salt water,on purpose would be their boat trailers,and we all know what salt water does,it aint helping nothing,thats for sure.

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you may have another weapon of choice,what ever works,Right!so after a while,it was in place,after that,its all she wrote!!,you just put it back together, and grease the hell out of it but,dam,Honda makes sure us home mechanics have some fun in the process!!

You are a glutton for punishment. Stem bearings are literally a 5 minute job with a hydraulic press. I use a Harbor Freight 6 ton shop press (~$90) that I extended to fit steering stems. This one is even better for only $120:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=1667

A press is worth having around just to squish things, but doing steering stems is just about all I use my press for. There is a "special tool" required, however - I made it from a 8-10" piece of 1" iron pipe - it's the perfect ID to just go around an XR400 (and most other bikes) steering stem. I ground a taper around the outside of one end of the pipe - leaving about a 1/8" rim around the ID of the pipe end - this allows me to use that end to press on just the inner race of the stem bearing.

First, you stick the bottom clamp on top of a socket so the stem can be pushed out into the socket hole. There is a reinforced rim around the stem hole on the bottom of the clamp - the rim of the socket sits on this reinforced area. Press down the stem and it pops out, pull it out and the bottom bearing and seal falls off. Flip the clamp over, and press the stem back in, using the special pipe to push against - clamp on top and stem through and into the pipe. When the stem is seated, stick the dust seal and bearing onto the stem, then drop the stem back into the special pipe (tapered side up) and press the clamp/stem down until the clamp seats against the bearing/seal, pushing against the bottom of the stem. A typical press shaft is small enough that you'll just hit the stem bottom. A bigger press shaft might need a small socket to push with. In any case, there is no stress applied to the triple clamp in any of these pressing steps. Also, you might as well grease the bearing before you press it on - makes it way easier to pack it full from the bottom. I then glop a good thick layer of grease all over the bearing and lightly coat the steering stem then stuff it back in - I use BelRay, as on everything else.

Just wait until you need to take the steering stem races out of the frame. That's another potential 12 hour cursing w/ BFH session. I'll tell you the "5 minute job" trick to that too if you need it.

JayC

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JC250X,thanks for the enlightenment,I didnt have the "special" tool your talking about,but I can see how it would speed it up, theres no way mine would of fell off,it was just to freaking tight.,I just ground the inner race down very thin,with out as much as nicking the stem shaft,then only stricking it lightly,it snapped apart, making a busting noise,,this should tell you how tight it was.

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JC250X,thanks for the enlightenment,I didnt have the "special" tool your talking about,but I can see how it would speed it up, theres no way mine would of fell off,it was just to freaking tight.,I just ground the inner race down very thin,with out as much as nicking the stem shaft,then only stricking it lightly,it snapped apart, making a busting noise,,this should tell you how tight it was.

No - the stem bearing is pressed onto the steering stem. The bottom of the stem is stepped into 3 diameters - bottom rim, the interference fit into the triple clamp, and an interference fit on the bearing. When you press the stem out of the clamp, the bearing is pressed out at the same time. That's when it falls off.

Cutting a pressed bearing off? How getto...:thumbsup:

JayC

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OOH,So thats how its gonna be, I got it off with out scratcing the stem with a 4-1/2 grinder, Free hand,It worked just fine,I said I did"nt have a press,and you gonna Dis me? You spelled Ghetto wrong,You should of looked on the sign in front of your card board box.

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OOH,So thats how its gonna be, I got it off with out scratcing the stem with a 4-1/2 grinder, Free hand,It worked just fine,I said I did"nt have a press,and you gonna Dis me? You spelled Ghetto wrong,You should of looked on the sign in front of your card board box.

Lighten up, Francis - it was a joke.

And you can solve that no press problem for cheap with the link I provided for you.

JayC

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Ok, so this may not be much help now that your done but it may come in handy the next time. When I did mine I used a ball joint removal tool to get the bearing off. (not a screwdriver as link suggest) However, I did use the oven and freezer trick.(step 3 of link) Man was it slick. Just held the bearing at the top of the stem and let it drop. Went all the way to the bottom. No Joke! Don't forget the dust seal.

http://www.ibmwr.org/ktech/steer-bearing-repl.shtml

Kevin

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No,Im a firm beliver in the freezer trick,I watched my buddy install a cutlass bearing on a shaft at work,and it was way easy,It works.

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