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lets see your tool kits

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there are tons of threads talking about what too have and what you need for an off road tool kit, i know because i have been trolling through them getting some ideas for my own. everybody says what they carry but hows about we SEE it? here is what i have gathered so far, its not laid out in the clearest manner but you get the idea, all of it will be going into an msr enduro pak and outdoor products backpack. let me know what you all think. SS850624.jpg

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there are tons of threads talking about what too have and what you need for an off road tool kit, i know because i have been trolling through them getting some ideas for my own. everybody says what they carry but hows about we SEE it? here is what i have gathered so far, its not laid out in the clearest manner but you get the idea, all of it will be going into an msr enduro pak and outdoor products backpack. let me know what you all think. SS850624.jpg

You're going to need a very good chiropractor and much heavier spring rates for your suspension! :thumbsup:

Seriously, think compact, versatile "multi-tools". Fender pack(s) for the heavy tubes, etc. will have your body thanking you. And don't forget the snack-size bag of Lay's potato chips...they're excellent fire-starters in an emergency.

(one tire spoon won't help much, you'll need two minimum)

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You're going to need a very good chiropractor and much heavier spring rates for your suspension! :thumbsup:

Seriously, think compact, versatile "multi-tools". Fender pack(s) for the heavy tubes, etc. will have your body thanking you. And don't forget the snack-size bag of Lay's potato chips...they're excellent fire-starters in an emergency.

(one tire spoon won't help much, you'll need two minimum)

lol yea i started going a little overboard but with that stuff i could do pretty much anything aside from rebuilding the motor. maybe i should break out the scale to get this down too size. oh yea and there are three tire irons there the big one and two mini ones in the motion pro pouch. i was happy to get those kobalt multi screwdrivers and there is a multi tool in the other pouch above the 20lb roll of duct tape lol somebodys gotta come on eventually with the good ol "wheres the kitchen sink"

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instead of the roll of duct tape, take it, wrap it around a screwdriver, combination wrench handle ect. run it around several times, makes a much smaller weight roll on something you already carry, and most trail repairs take less than 4 feet. no need for a 50 yard roll on cardboard. just remember to reload after use.

also does not lower the sticking property's of ductape. believe me, I've used it a lot.

loose the hammer, a rock will work.

zipties, take a couple of long ones, wrap them around your upper fork tubes between the tripple clamps, and stuff a bunch of zipties underneath, then they are always attached to the bike.

see pic next to number plate with white zipties

DSC_2700.jpg

ditch the 3/8 drive socket, a 1/4 inch drive will have 90% of the sockets you need, use an adapter for the few others, and not many things are torqued that tight beisides axles.

ditch the snapring pliers, the knife, and both sets of regular pliers you have, get a gerber or leatherman type needlenose plier tool. can do the job of these in a pinch, trail tools are pinch tools, not shop tools

a flint/steel ect. to start a fire is good to have along with your compass

you only need one spare spark plug, you can clean the other one if you need to replace it again.

add a couple more air canisters for your Co2 setup. a rear usually takes 2 or 3 full cannisters. also a patch kit instead of tubes will work in many situations to at least get you out someplace.oops see you have them underneath now......

I'll put up picks of my tool bag that I use in the morning when I get home. its in a walmart makeup bag that I bought for $1

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Great tips. Thanks guys. I guess I will have to go shopping. I rarely take anything with me as far as tools go and just rely on the Honda reliability. Not very smart... I know.

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Great tips. Thanks guys. I guess I will have to go shopping. I rarely take anything with me as far as tools go and just rely on the Honda reliability. Not very smart... I know.

Nope, you'll hate yourself the day it happens. :thumbsup: What NavyNuke said is all great advise. I for one, keep a handfull of common metric hardware in my pack as well. I would also keep the needle nose vise grips. Can of Fix-a-Flat in a backpack for looooooonger rides.

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I've tried fix a flat on 3 or 4 flats, and all I ever got out of it was a mess. just my experiance there.

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NavyNuke has good ideas for a common sense approach to this. Since I have the long style fork skins on my bikes, I slide the larger size zip ties into those from the top and leave the head of the ties exposed. Quick-dispensing and they stay put until needed. I carry some straps (8-10" length) with velcro closures around the frame's downtube. I once managed to rig a buddy's broken clutch lever with one well enough to get him back to the truck. It would've been simpler if one of us had been packing an extra set of levers...:thumbsup:...but it was a private trail system we were riding that day, so the ride back wasn't far enough from any point to require carrying much more than hydropacks.

An extra master link and mini chain tool would most likely never get used, but can be a life-saver and worth packing. A small tube of quicksilver and 5 minute ribbon epoxy is great for emergency repairs on a punctured radiator or side case. And if you should find yourself in the middle of nowhere having lost your coolant, taking a wizz in your radiator will get you back. It'll smell like hell's septic tank, but it will work.

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I've tried fix a flat on 3 or 4 flats, and all I ever got out of it was a mess. just my experiance there.

It's saved me a lot of time in baja, so many times. I agree, it's a mess though when it doesn't work, even when it does work, ya gotta change that tube someday.

Luck of the 'flat' I guess :thumbsup:

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I've tried fix a flat on 3 or 4 flats, and all I ever got out of it was a mess. just my experiance there.

I've seen some guys get lucky with it, and others not. I use slime in my tubes and summer of 2000 was the only time I've had a flat (before I started using the slime).

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ok here's a basic trail kit. on long rides, add to this tubes/more general tools, but a basic list. only thing missing is a 10mm wrench, hmm gotta figure out where that went

anyway

P1010054.jpg

phillips head screwdriver, with ductape wrapped around it(bright red)

8mm,10mm,12mm,13mm(KTM) and cut off 17mm combination wrench's. 17 is cut off for float bowl access.

roll of electrical tape

1/4 inch drive wrench

extension

6,8,10,12,13,14 mm sockets

crescent wrench that will do plugs on my KTM smoker

lighter

allen set tool

gu packet for when you run out of energy

gerber needle nose set

extra master link for my chain

spark plug

Co2 + cannisters

tube patch kit(dont' skimp, go to bicycle shop, and get the good ones)

2 tire irons, one with a wrench size that works on my axle nuts

also missing JB quick, one popped last ride

couple of sockets I was using this morning and are sitting on the bike

and all the zipties I keep in the other photo.

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ok here's a basic trail kit. on long rides, add to this tubes/more general tools, but a basic list. only thing missing is a 10mm wrench, hmm gotta figure out where that went

anyway

P1010054.jpg

phillips head screwdriver, with ductape wrapped around it(bright red)

8mm,10mm,12mm,13mm(KTM) and cut off 17mm combination wrench's. 17 is cut off for float bowl access.

roll of electrical tape

1/4 inch drive wrench

extension

6,8,10,12,13,14 mm sockets

crescent wrench that will do plugs on my KTM smoker

lighter

allen set tool

gu packet for when you run out of energy

gerber needle nose set

extra master link for my chain

spark plug

Co2 + cannisters

tube patch kit(dont' skimp, go to bicycle shop, and get the good ones)

2 tire irons, one with a wrench size that works on my axle nuts

also missing JB quick, one popped last ride

couple of sockets I was using this morning and are sitting on the bike

and all the zipties I keep in the other photo.

Nice compact setup. But where does the Bud Light go? :thumbsup:

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Nice compact setup. But where does the Bud Light go? :thumbsup:

lol +3. thats a whole other thread, how to carry your beer when you ride, classic

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lol +3. thats a whole other thread, how to carry your beer when you ride, classic

I'm sure this could be retro-fitted to a real helmet. Might interfere with the helmet cam, though...

Goofy_Stuff_Beer_Holder_Helmet.jpg

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just make sure its bud lite and not budweiser...you could get 2 more mph with the weight savings, lol anyway who else has a pic of their kits

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lol budlight is because I got off work at 6am for the start of my 4 day weekend. 30 minutes after this, I was sound asleep.

I almost finished the can while laying it out, and another while typing it out:thumbsup:

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Needle nose vise grips. They can take so many things apart as well as becoming a new clutch lever, gear shift, etc... It's always been a good tool to help get you home.

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Needle nose vise grips. They can take so many things apart as well as becoming a new clutch lever, gear shift, etc... It's always been a good tool to help get you home.

+1 on the needle nose vise grips. One of the most "McGyver-ish" tools I own! :thumbsup:

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