I've lost my 'off road' virginity!!!

I have to confess that I'd never ridden off road before until yesterday and today. Yesterday I found a great dirt track that I knew as a kid and visited it on the DR650.

It was hilarious!:lol:

I rattled down there at a good rate of knots and to my surprise found a great off road play area that's been created by 4x4s and other MXers.:ride: So I introduced the bike to some mud too and got it fairly filthy.

I found myself giggling like a kid and left fully stoked.

I went out on another trail today; a mixture of dirt and gravel. I had the back end out a little, making tails, and was having some proper fun.

My only regret?.....

....That I'd never done this before! I can see me selling my Blackbird at this rate. I can't see me needing it much anymore :thumbsup:

Ps. And I was quite pleased that I never dropped the bike in the mud either!:rant:

I have to confess that I'd never ridden off road before until yesterday and today. Yesterday I found a great dirt track that I knew as a kid and visited it on the DR650.

It was hilarious!:o

I rattled down there at a good rate of knots and to my surprise found a great off road play area that's been created by 4x4s and other MXers.:rant: So I introduced the bike to some mud too and got it fairly filthy.

I found myself giggling like a kid and left fully stoked.

I went out on another trail today; a mixture of dirt and gravel. I had the back end out a little, making tails, and was having some proper fun.

My only regret?.....

....That I'd never done this before! I can see me selling my Blackbird at this rate. I can't see me needing it much anymore :thumbsup:

Ps. And I was quite pleased that I never dropped the bike in the mud either!:lol:

Great! Just don't get to cocky.. :mad: The big DR will bite if you drop your guard. :ride:

Ps. And I was quite pleased that I never dropped the bike in the mud either!:thumbsup:

It's going to happen sooner or later, are your levers protected?

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I'm new to dirt as well, I love it!!! I have been riding the local forest quite a bit, slinging mud if I can. I ride alone so I will have to be careful, getting stuck is not much fun with the bike weighing 370lbs. Have gotten a few moments of anxiety sweat, lots of curses. Just today I just fell over into a ditch, lost balance and couldn't catch it because there was no ground on the right side of the bike for my foot to catch. Thing went down into the ditch, wheels up. That bike is a heavy sucker if you have to lift it up from that position.

:ride::rant::lol::mad::o:D;):bonk::eek:

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I'm taking it pretty easy at the moment; I'd imagine that if anyone experienced in off road riding would say that I'm pedestrian, but it feels like I'm flying to me! :thumbsup:

I'm quite cautious so I won't be going gung-ho at any trails, not least till I've got a bit of experience and skills to equip me. I've got some rally-pro handguards to at least keep my levers intact should I get beyond myself (or should I say 'when').

I'm riding alone myself currently, but I'm considering joining the TRF (Trail Riders Federation) here in England so that I've got some folk to ride with. I'm not sure my local group are terribly active though.

Bogieknight,

Pedestrian is okay especially if you are on your own. Hurting yourself with help out of reach is no fun. I have seen the results first hand, so pleeease, ride safe.

Blasting along can be a lot of fun, but by slowing down it is possible to enjoy the scenery.

Cheers

Ain't the dirt grand, watch the sand on stock tires though. Ride your own pace and have a blast.:thumbsup:

I think off road is more of a challenge than the street and more fun. And there's no one turning left in front of you.

I love off road riding. I've ran into a few trees and rocks, but atleast they didn't pull out in front of me. I do like the idea of slowing down to look around.

Thanks All, for the advice.

I do intend on living to a ripe old age, so I won't be pushing the envelope dramatically, just enough to learn and stretch myself. Little by little, you know what I mean.

Keep the advice coming, everything is useful.

Cheers

Sounds like fun. I'm pretty new to dirt as well. This has been the first bike that I've owned that was intended for that purpose. I don't get to go out as much as I'd like to. I get tossed off of the bike more often than not. Needless to say, I don't try to rush things. I learned another important lesson last week. If you are uncertain of the terrain ahead, get off the bike and check it out. I was riding in an area that was "a little muddy". Well, in fact, it was actually "a lot muddy". I found this out when I tried to ride through and the bike sank. I didn't think it was a big deal. The rear wheel was spinning, so I kicked the bike in to second, which usually does the trick. Well, no luck. At that point I was still under the illusion that I would not be getting dirty. I stepped off the bike and it stood up on its own. It was then that I realized all was lost. As I walked around the bike, I sank to me knees in a few places. It was a mess. I ended up tipping the bike on its side and trying to slide it out. That didn't work. Ultimately, I had to call my wife (how embarrassing is that?). She threatened to bring the camera but forgot. In the end, I slid a sheet of playwood under the tires, we picked up the bike and rolled it out. All told, it took two and a half hours, I was exhausted, and I'm still being laughed at by my wife.

Even so, I can't wait to go riding again. Hopefully I'll use a little more sense next time.

I too ride alone. I learned the hard way of the value of carrying extra hand levers. When bent, they tend to snap off rather than bend back in place. The righthand lever is different from the lefthand lever, so they are not interchangeable. Have a good set of wrenches, as well. The ones in the tool kit are less than desirable. Two wrenches with of the same size are called for in some situations.

Cheers!

Getting hurt badly deep in the middle of nowhere is not fun.

I'm 42 and out of shape- I go out alone and take it slow- I simply can't afford to get hurt and I'm not out to impress anybody.

I bought a 2006 leftover KDX200 and that's what I use on the trails- though the DR is set up for off-road.

For me, it's all about being on the bike and feeling a little younger, being part of it again, that make sense?

It may sound weird, but when I'm heading home and see the KDX on the trailer- even that makes me feel good!

Just being connected to dirt bikes again is important to me...

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I will say, be sure you have the proper gear; the basics are obvious; Helmet, Goggles, Gloves & Boots- but also some of the not-so-obvious; knee & elbow pads, kidney belt, chest protector.

If you are uncertain of the terrain ahead, get off the bike and check it out. I was riding in an area that was "a little muddy". Well, in fact, it was actually "a lot muddy". I found this out when I tried to ride through and the bike sank. <SNIP> Ultimately, I had to call my wife (how embarrassing is that?).

Exactly!

For potentially bad obstacles (deep wash-outs, swampy mud, etc) I stop, get off the bike, scout the area, decide on the attack-path, test the ground for firmness and "slipperyness", get back on, take a deep breath and go for it. Or, often I decide to turn around, hoping to see it again after I got a little more experience. That turning around has been proven to be quite interesting itself sometimes. Those puddles in the (off)road can also be quite deep at times, looks like nothing and then all of a sudden you front wheel is submerged :thumbsup:

Riding standing up is the way to go, for sure. The DVD that dualsportriding.com sells is quite good. I watch it before I venture out and after I come back.

And the scouting allows you to take a picture. Not that it shows much, but when you're on the trail you don't have much time to take pics, so at least you have something :ride:

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The DVD that dualsportriding.com sells is quite good. I watch it before I venture out and after I come back.

Hmmmmm. I'm not familiar with that. Any good? Is it relevant to US riders only or is if for a wider audience?

Hmmmmm. I'm not familiar with that. Any good? Is it relevant to US riders only or is if for a wider audience?

It works for me. I'd say the DVD is relevant for any beginning dual sport rider starting to do some off road riding and understands English. For USD 30 I think it is a great asset for the beginner. In the Extras they show you how to change a rear tire (tyre for you guys :thumbsup: ), that was VERY helpful to me.

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