'03 TE610E Timing Chaing Adjustment Help!

Here is a pic of the cam chain adjuster on my 03 TE610E, as you can see it is different than the newer version. I have removed a phillips head cover to reveal the part you see in the center. It has the 6 teeth you can see and a threaded hole with a slotted head screw(dark color), I guess, in the center. Is this a manual or automatic adjuster? What do I need to do to check the timing chain slack?

The engine is very similar to the newer version just some of these types of details are different.

DSC03573.jpg

Bump :thumbsup:

Anybody? Beuller....Beuller...

Hi , I just posted the full "way to go method" then the Server lost it -DOH!

right -

The small slot within the tensioner ,does indeed back out the "pusher -arm".

personally , I would do this..(read through to familiarise yourself)

1ST ; undo and remove the 2 smallgoldscrews at the flange of the tensioner.

2ND remove the tensioner - watch for the "o" ring seal.

Do whatever you need in the motor.

THEN

1 ; check-out which way to turn the inner screw - small flat blade screwdriver.

2 ; push tensioner back into cylinder

3; insert 2x gold screws tighten a couple of threads

4 , use flat blade screwdriver to back -off the "push-rod" of the tensioner

While at the same time tighten fully the 2xgold screws .

5 ; you can then release the screwdriver.

hope this makes it a little clearer.

Charlie

Hope it goes O.K. for you ,

pretty simple when you see it all. This is obviously an Automatic tensioner - oil damped.

Biggest concern of mine is the MAZDA symbol on the tensioner flange..

These tensioners are the worst part of these engines, Same as the DRZ's the oil pressure can "push" the cam-chain too hard.

these tensioners don't travel a set distance of "clicks" , so I'm not sure how you determine excessive chain-wear without further stripping.

My only thought , I can suggest (I tried this on my 410)

turn the centre slotted screw the "WRONG" way with the motor running , and see if the chain slap subsides.

my thoughts are that the tensioner is essentially a worm-screw with a spring pre-load and as you reach the extent of the spring there is very little "push" on the chain slipper. how many miles have you got on this chain? , mine went after 5,000 miles of high speed ( needle on the orange line on the rev. counter /tacho)

Charlie

Charlie

Hope it goes O.K. for you ,

pretty simple when you see it all. This is obviously an Automatic tensioner - oil damped.

Biggest concern of mine is the MAZDA symbol on the tensioner flange..

These tensioners are the worst part of these engines, Same as the DRZ's the oil pressure can "push" the cam-chain too hard.

these tensioners don't travel a set distance of "clicks" , so I'm not sure how you determine excessive chain-wear without further stripping.

My only thought , I can suggest (I tried this on my 410)

turn the centre slotted screw the "WRONG" way with the motor running , and see if the chain slap subsides.

my thoughts are that the tensioner is essentially a worm-screw with a spring pre-load and as you reach the extent of the spring there is very little "push" on the chain slipper. how many miles have you got on this chain? , mine went after 5,000 miles of high speed ( needle on the orange line on the rev. counter /tacho)

Charlie

Charlie

Thanks for the help Charlie. :thumbsup: I have about 8500 miles on this one, don't really notice any chain slap noise but with all the cct posts on the new TE610 I thought I should have a look at mine. With the 610 I have not really pushed the redline at all in my type of riding. When you say "mine went after 5,000 miles of high speed" how did you know? A lot of chain slapping noise?

Hi , the bike was very "clattery" when hot , a real loud rattle , but you couldn't really tell where from.

bike was still performing well though.

Would not make a lot of noise when cold though , but once warmed up it was quite noticeable.

these engines are generally a little noisy , but once the timing gear had been replaced ( by my local KTM dealer..)

the bike was almost "sewing machine like", really smooth and quiet.

Hope this helps, Charlie

Bump, and hi Charlie!

 

OK, let me get this straight:  As if the undocumented electrics were not bad enough, we also have a complete lack of info on the ACCTs  of TE410Es, TE610Es and TE610SMs ca. 2000.

How the fcυk did people put up with it?

 

My understanding now is that people who have ACCTs of this type, like I do:

DSC03573.jpg

 

cannot use the method commonly described for checking the chain tension!  (I.e. undo the central bolt, undo side bolts, count clicks, etc)

In fact, as far as I can tell from what I've read, people with this kind of system have NO WAY of telling what their cam chain tension is, short of stripping the engine!  Is this correct?

 

HOO BOY!

 

Maybe I should just change the chain anyway, gawdknows what state it may be in.

Also, is it possible to replace this ACCT, even if it's just with a manual one.

 

Man, I like the bike, but soooo many maintenance headaches, and most of them unnecessary, really...

My bike  ( 410) was fantastic,

 only issues in 4 years of 70+ mph commuting, were 2 x tail bulbs ( from the vibes)

 

but after 3 x timing gear changes in 16,000 miles,

 I'd had enough,

 so sold it

 

I was going to use one of the old baseplate flanges to make a "lock-nut" type manual tensioner.. just never got around to it.

 George Erl "uptite" stated it was an oil spec issue that caused premature cam-chain wear,

 

 quite possible.. as I said my 410 was on the amber line of tacho for 20 mins twice a day.. so it did well,

 the DRZ's wer'nt THAT THOUGH.

 

Charlie - Oxford

Edited by varesecrazy

Yeah, I know what you mean, they're surprisingly good at motorway speed, aren't they?

True dual-purpose.

At this stage I'd even be prepared to put up with a 5000 mile cam-chain interval.  Ask me again how I feel about this after I've been through one or two. :D

All I ask for is for obvious stuff to be documented... somewhere... anywhere...

I'm shocked at how piss-poor the available knowledge bases are.

 

Thing is, what are the alternatives?  DRZ?  KTM LC?  CCM 644?

The last one of the above sounds appealing engine-wise (DR650), but is supposed to have poor build issues,

XR etc are good, but I'm too old for a kickstarter  :p

 

I think I'll stick with Husky for the mo.  Eyeballing a 610SM for the street.

 

Hi All

 

I managed to get an old Automatic Cam Chain Tensioner to take apart, and I can confirm Charlie's statements.

 

my thoughts are that the tensioner is essentially a worm-screw with a spring pre-load and as you reach the extent of the spring there is very little "push" on the chain slipper. how many miles have you got on this chain? , mine went after 5,000 miles of high speed ( needle on the orange line on the rev. counter /tacho)

 

I decided to put my post here, even if it's an old thread, but you can find it by searching on "ACCT", so this is as good as any place.  I may write some more later, but in brief:

 

YOU CAN (SORT OF) TELL THE CHAIN WEAR WITH AN ACCT!

As Charlie said, it's essentially a grub screw setup:  Do you see the small slot, the one exposed when you remove the ACCT cover screw? (see pic post#9 above)

If you turn this screw clockwise and count how many turns it takes, that should give you an indication --  the grub screw is spring loaded and should return to where it was when you remove the screwdriver.    Now on the ones I tested, I found that full extension (I.e. your chain is gone and the tensioner is doing nothing) happens at about two and a half full turns, maybe two and three-quarters, iow 900° to 990°.  Personally, if I found the grub screw was returning more than 720° I would definitely be thinking about a cam-chain change, like, pronto.

 

Hope this is helpful, I might write some more later, but thought I'd get this out for now.

I think you could use this system as a manual CCT, too, if your spring was gone, for instance.  The grub screw seems to operate 1-way only (i.e. ONLY from the screwdriver end), does not yield to "backward" pressure, which would be coming from the chain.  That's why when you first get it, it is fully extended and you can't push it back!  You have to wind it in from the slot as you fit it (like Charlie said), otherwise it probably won't go, or it will overstretch and probably damage the chain if it's new.  More as I figure it out.

 

I still can't help thinking: would it really have hurt anyone to have told us these simple things -- sheesh.  Anyways, aparently these kind of tensioners appear on other bikes, too.  I don't know makes and models, so for now that's hearssay.

Edited by NoMad410

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now