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KLX Lowering Link

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Has anyone ever used a lowering link on a KLX 300? I was thinking about installing one so I could more easily reach the ground but didn't want to give up handling as a trade off. Please let me know what you think about them if you have used them. Thanks.

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I'f you're not a super aggressive rider and/or heavy, a set of Kouba Links would be a great option. You can raise the forks approx. 1/2 inch and still have a very settled lower feel of the bike.

http://koubalink.com/KLX250-300.html

Has anyone ever used a lowering link on a KLX 300? I was thinking about installing one so I could more easily reach the ground but didn't want to give up handling as a trade off. Please let me know what you think about them if you have used them. Thanks.

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The rear suspension on a klx300 is about 11 inches. If you put on a lowering link that lowers the bike 1.25 inches is your overall travel now 9.75 inches ?

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Not sure what the mathmatical end state will be, but consider that if you add lowering links, you're increasing the swingarm's leverage against the shock spring and valving. It will be much easier to compress the shock with lowering links installed, so you'll need to increase both the preload and the compression/rebound settings on the shock.

If you lower the rear and raise the front, you'll get a really wonky geometry that will not steer well. The bike has to be balanced, which means you'll have to equal on the front what you do to the rear if you want to maintain the bike's handling qualities. The forks can slide up in the triple clamps a little bit, which should ball park it for you.

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Indeed, many riders with aftermarket links do not recheck and reset sag (if they even did that in the first place with the stock setup). For those looking just to touch the ground (beginner who rides fireroads at leisurely pace) just resetting sag should be exactly what they're in search of. Those more aggressive will probably be advised to take some sag out (which decreases laden seat height), go in on the high speed compression a bit and also the rebound.

Not doing the above is probably the #1 reason some riders have a bad taste in their mouth about links: they rode a poorly set up bike/it hit the fender so hard/it bottomed violently. Beside, if a rider is bottoming violently with an aftermarket link set up properly they probably needed a stiffer spring to begin with/using the stock suspension.

Changes to rake/trail affect geometry at a different rate than changes to the rear suspension. There does not have to be a 1:1 ratio to get a near-balanced ride. Many off-road racers use 1 inch lowering links (really performance links since many of these riders/racers are not short in the inseam) and set their sag at 1/2" less than factory spec....but they only raise their forks approximately 6mm (1/4 inch) give or take a millimeter either way.

Not sure what the mathmatical end state will be, but consider that if you add lowering links, you're increasing the swingarm's leverage against the shock spring and valving. It will be much easier to compress the shock with lowering links installed, so you'll need to increase both the preload and the compression/rebound settings on the shock.

If you lower the rear and raise the front, you'll get a really wonky geometry that will not steer well. The bike has to be balanced, which means you'll have to equal on the front what you do to the rear if you want to maintain the bike's handling qualities. The forks can slide up in the triple clamps a little bit, which should ball park it for you.

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With most lowering links on most bikes, you actually GAIN travel because the rear wheel is able to move further into its path arc.

Hmmm, I wonder what the actual travel of the KLX300 is. Many bikes claim to have 10 inches, for example, but I've measured many out and sometimes it's as low as 6.5 inches of actual usable travel.

The rear suspension on a klx300 is about 11 inches. If you put on a lowering link that lowers the bike 1.25 inches is your overall travel now 9.75 inches ?

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Thanks for all the input. I am still confused on where I would end up if I chose to put the 1.25" lowering links on my klx300. I have had both the front forks and the rear shock reworked by our local expert. He put .42 springs and gold valves in the front and re worked the shim stack in the rear per his recommendation. Currently the front forks are raised about .25" with the ability to go to approximately 1" before hitting the bottom of the bars.The rear sag is about 3.75" with rider on. The front compression is set at 8 clicks in and the rear is 12 clicks in. The rebound damping is set at 14 clicks in. Although I am not an expert rider I do push it from time to time and do not want an end swap as a reward for my messing around with the suspension. My goal is to have a little more ability to dogpaddle my way thru some of the trails that we ride in the Colorado high country. Any thoughts ?

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I would go with the lowering links, ask the local expert what he recommends for resetting your preload, compression and rebound - then check your sag again. Ride the bike and if the front end pushes too much, bring the forks up in the triple clamps. That's about as good as you're going to get it.

Who did your suspension? Where are you riding in CO?

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Race Tech did my work. We ride a lot of the trail systems in the Taylor Park area some years and then we switch over to the Pitkin side of the divide and ride trails and passes there. We base camp at about 10,000 ft. and ride as high as we can get. Great fun. thanks for the response.

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