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OIL DRAIN PLUG - OOOOOOOOPS!!!!!!!


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Anyone else have this problem? I was fuming mad ๐Ÿ™‚:D :D earlier today...... I think the hulk must have been installing drain plugs at the factory when my bike was built.

I had quite a day today as I attempted my first oil change. The bottom 8mm hex (Allen) drain plug was in so tight that I stripped the faces off of the inside of the plug while attempting to remove it. I was using a high quality 8mm Allen socket and even tried using an Impact, but didn't want to hit too hard with a hammer and crack the cases. I ended up needing to get a large easy out and with a lot of work, I finally got it out with nothing worse for the wear. After calling 6 or so dealers I finally found that Eric's in Pasadena had a drain plug in stock.

The rest of the day went much better after I finally had it removed. I wonder if the factory used loctite on the plug?????? Whatever the reason, watch out when you remove the bottom plug the first time.

JN

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Hans and Frans the wild and crazy Austrians from SNL install all of those new at the Factory. They are installed dry (pre-oil) and it is very important to shock the bolt and remove before your first ride as the heating and cooling makes this overtorqued underlubed bolt even worse to get out. Your probably thinking you'd loose the oil provided. In 98 I bought a new 200 MXC only M/C I ever bought and rode without changing the oil first, to my dismay after 60 hard miles on a grass track being flogged by me and a host of my riding buddies I drained out a total of 4 Ounces of syrup from the tranny 1 week later KTM sent out a bulletin some 200's had been distributed without oil. The moral of this long story is trust yourself not Hans and Frans shock that bolt and change the oil to your oil of choice before the 1st ride

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Lots and lots of incidents of this for the last 3 years or so. Do some searching to find fellow sufferer's. I've always had good luck with those but I knew to shock it the first time before I got my first RFS. I re-torque it to the recommended 7ft lbs and never have any problems with them after that. I've never used anti-seize but other's have and liked it.

Brapoffroad.com sells a trick replacement for that plug. It's a hex head. I'd go for one of those if I ever rounded one out.

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Thanks Guys,

Wish I would had searched a little before riding, although I would have never guessed that this problem would have even been an issue based on my past 26 years of riding history including too many bikes to list....... ๐Ÿ™‚:D

JN

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all you have to do with the plugs rather it be the allen or bolt type is crystaize it by putting the allen key or socket with extinsion depending on what one you want out and WACK IT.... with a hammer then it should come out easy

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It is called the lower oil screen plug. The real oil drain plug is at the left rear. It also has a quirk. The copper washer will stick to the engine case when the bolt is removed , then fall out with the drain oil. If the bolt is reinstalled without the washer it may leak and will distort the threads enough to make them tighten up the next time it is removed. If your bolt tightens up after a few turns out, that is what happened. Replace the stock (looser) washer with one from a brake banjo fitting. It will be tight to thread it over the bolt threads but will stay with the bolt untill forceably removed. I used Goodwrench part # P44518-6. Dennis Kirk 6 for $2.99 PN 19-2872.

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I did the exact same thing this weekend. I ended up drilling it out. I put anti-sieze on the replacement one and was even tempted to just pull the screen out and not worry about it. Since this one sucks oil for the transmission and it has a magnetic drain plug anyway it may be overkill. Does anyone have an opionion on this? Mike

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Just go buy an spare because you'll eventually need it. For some reason the O-ring on that plug makes it stick fast. I've tried whacking it with an impact driver and a hammer. The impact works the best...just shocking the thing with an allen wrench and hammer doesn't seem to make much difference. I use a 1/2 inch drive, fourteen inch long breaker bar and make sure the hex driver is squarely in the bottom of the recess before applying pressure. Laying the bike on it's side seems to work for me.

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I was preparing my 450 EXC for it's first ride, and decided to check the torque of the bottom drain/filter plug. WOW... :D :D ๐Ÿ™‚...was it ever unbelievably tight. So much so, that I couldn't get it off. Fearful of stripping it, I stopped. I was using the same 8mm Allen that I used on my '02 400 EXC. Now I'm worried that if I decide to ride it, it will get torqued on there even more. :D:D:D

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  • 2 weeks later...

THAT DOES IT ๐Ÿ™‚. I just ordered the Brap replacement bolt today. I just changed my oil for the 2nd time (No filter change this time) after 324 miles and 17.7 hours. I went to undo the bottom screen bolt (The one with the 8mm Allen) and I can tell that the Allen socket is going to strip out again inside the drain plug just like the first one did. Although I have one more spare drain plug that I bought at the time of my first oil change I have decided to leave this one in and just wait for the Brap. http://brapoffroad.com/bolts.htm)

JN

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Is the plug made of steel and the pan of aluminum? If so, the cause of the problem may be that dissimilar metals will corrode and eventually seize the way a spark plug will seize in an aluminum head. A little dab of Never-Seize should take care of it.

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another trick that helps make the screen bolts and drain bolt easier to remove. Wrap a few turns of teflon pipe thread tape around the threads before installing it. Works the same as anti seaze compound but you don't run the risk of aluminum particles from the antiseaze getting into the oil. Made my bolts MUCH easier to remove.

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Teflon tape has a very high melting point and is rated for high temp service. I don't have exact temps, but I seem to recall above 300-400C, which is well above anything the oil should see. IF it melts, you've got bigger problems!! When I remove the drain plugs, I can usually just unwrap the tape if I can find the starting point, no sign of melting. very similar to when I unwrap any plumbing connections with teflon tape.

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