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Extreme rear sprocket wear


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Hello, is it normal for the stock rear sprocket to wear out in only about 4 full days of riding total? I rode my 450 on a track all day yesterday in the mud. When I got home and washed it I was shocked to find all the teeth were real shiny and all curved foward and the slots look ovaled out. I did forget to lube it during the day and the track is loam and was very wet. Could this be enough to wear a sprocket this fast on a powerful bike,(I have never had one before)? Maybe I am adjusting the chain wrong? The book shows only 1 3/8" play which seems tight. I was told to use the two finger method. Help! what I am doing wrong, why did the sproket wear so fast? Both chain and sprockets are still stock. Maybe this is normal time for wear

03 450 (first fast bike ever owned)Tag-t2 black cr high, Tag bar clamps,D.I.D. Dirtstar black rims, acerbis black plastics, throttle jockey graphics, Guts gripper seat, Twin air, eilback 5.9 rear spring, 4.7 fronts and re-valve, Carmichael Honda exhaust system(like a T-4)WC engine gaurds, skid plate, rad braces.

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Musta been the mud.

I've got over 40 hours on the OEM chain & rear sprocket and they look like they're go at least another 20.

Hardly ever had it in the mud, a fresh watered track is all.

Got a DID-X & 52 rear sprocket in the parts box just waitin for the stockers to give up......

1 3/8" Chain adjust works fine. Chain is only 3/4" tigher at its tightest point compared to on the stand. I did lots of measurements on this when I had to replace swingarm bearings at 25hrs due to rust and the crummy stock grease job.

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I did what elroy did, chucked that stocker chain after 6 hrs. I was wasted and was gonna take ou the sproket next. An ironman is next on the list when this one goes but the o-ring chain is holding up awesome. 30+ hrs. & going. Just make sure to flip your counter sproket over to givit added clearance from your case. (or a shim if you prefer)

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HI, Hoffy! It should have NOT worn out that fast. Don't want to upset you or anything but seem's to me you were riding and running it too loose. From the point of full extension to full compression the chain get's LOOSER so most just run an inch to 1+ 1/4. Measure where buffer ends which is about the middle of the swingarm. Chain is at it's TIGHTEST point when sitting on a stand. Just sounds like to me the chain got excessive slop in it 2+? inches and you kept riding it and this caused the extreme wear. I'm sure the mud didn't help either! You MUST keep constant eye on it (stock one) and NOT leave it get too loose. ALWAY's adjust on stand with chain clean! Rotate wheel 1st to find tightest point as ALL chains get looser and tighter as you rotate the wheel. If you want mark link at tightest point with nail polish or something so you always have that reference point. Hope this helps! I recommend the Ironman too! Keep an eye on your swingarm buffer too! www.ironmansprockets.com

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I agree with you on most bikes it is but NOT on the crf! This has been talked about before and if you push down on rear or have 2 guys sit on it so it goes pass that alinement point you will see it just keeps getting looser and looser.

It must have to do with the fact that the swingarm is welded in a fashion that it's angled down and does not run parallel with the chain?

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The chain is looser above and below the alignment point. But as I said, it is tightest when the 3 points are in line. The chain will loosen as the axle falls or rises from that point. Granted the rollers will take up some slack. I have a CRF out in the shop that I removed the shock so I could move the swingarm thru its complete arc. The shape of the swingarm is irrellevant...it is the location of the axle with the other 2 points.

I cant believe all of this hubbub on adjusting a chain...jeesh

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I thought the same thing you did huffa. I took my shock off and levered the swingarm threw it's arc with the chain on the bike and the rear wheel off the ground. I could swear that the tightest point for the chain was when the swingarm was fully extended downward. Now I'm going to have to do it again just to see who's right about this.

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The in line method is supposed to be the longest distance from sprocket to sprocket. If it goes up or down consider the swingarm mounted wear blocks that can interfere. If thats the case the in line theory hits the dumpster. Only way to know for sure is disconnect the shock and stare in amazement. 🙂

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Thanks for all the replys guys. You have been a huge help. No wonder I was so confused. I would have never figured that the chain is at its tightest when on a stand. DUH... Oh well live and learn. Gives me a reason to buy a Ironman anyways. Thanks "HUFFA" for the insight and instructions.

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Elroyona, See! I Knew it! But it's been 8 months or so that I tried it and I am only human and do make mistakes so thanks for the retest of it!

Hoffy, no problemo at all. That's what we are all here for - to debate and solve our problems no matter how big or little they may be!

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you are probably running your chain too tight. when your swingarm is in a completely horizontal position, the chain should still have a little slack in it. if you can compress the suspension with tie-downs and hold it there, then you can check your slack. i see to many guys run their chain banjo-tight and wonder why the are shot in no time. my .02 worth.

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