Suzuki DRZ400s sprocket change

Hey all!

I had a question... I recently started riding street legal bikes (just as i turned 16) and have a Suzuki DRZ400s right now... I love the bike but the one thing I see wrong with it really is that it won't do 70mph very well without feeling like the piston is going to come jumping out of the head. I don't ride off road much and don't mind sacrificing some acceleration and tight riding for a little more speed. I was wondering about a sprocket change and how much one might cost... I'm fairly new to working on bikes but I've had some mechanical experience and am hoping to do it myself. So any information you all can give me would be great! thanks!

:ride:

Happy riding

Caleb

put a 41 tooth in the back and try that, loosen the nuts on the rear spocket first, should take about 10 minutes. that is the only gearing change that i have done and can cruise at 75.

on the "S" I would install a 16 tooth on the counter shaft

driven has the best fitting one

I ran 15-44 on my DRZ-S. Thats the stock gearing. It would do 70, with out too much revving.

I now run 15-51, it still does 70mph, with quite a bit of revving(it'll still do 82 indicated)

I dont think a 16 tooth front sprocket will work, my 15 tooth is just barely clearing as it is now. I'd just change the rear-its the easiest to do, put a 41 tooth on.

on my SM that has smaller 17 inch wheels I run a 16/41 ( stock is a 15/41 )

I did not need to gear up to do 100 but it helps with viberations at crusing speed

on my SM that has smaller 17 inch wheels I run a 16/41 ( stock is a 15/41 )

I did not need to gear up to do 100 but it helps with viberations at crusing speed

Hey Iowa Bro - I'm thinking of putting a 16 on my SM - did you give up much down low?

ps - got my MCCT just right, thanks for your advice there. :ride:

if I was looking to do more wheeleys than I do I would reinstall the 15

the 16 from driven was worth the money and really was not to much money .... but the rear sprockets cost so much more

I guess what I'm trying to say is

if your going to try diferent gearing ( for the " lets see if I like it or not") than the 16 is far cheeper than buying a rear sproket

need more beer

i got a 41-tooth sprocket for sale of my 08drz400sm, check it out in the classifieds section on here

i got a 41-tooth sprocket for sale of my 08drz400sm, check it out in the classifieds section on here

I know i forfeit some acceleration and some power down low but minus giving the bike a bit more speed does changing the bike from a 44t to a 41t rear sprocket change the handling much? Also, which is easier to change? Iowa says to change the front cause it's cheaper, but if the pricing ain't too much different which one is easier? I know the back has more room to work with but...

also, would changing the sprocket make me have to worry about changing the chain?

also, would changing the sprocket make me have to worry about changing the chain?

As long as you're only going up one in front or down 2 in the back you can keep the same chain.

If you ride much on the street, and especially at highway speeds, you will see a big difference by switching to a 41 tooth rear sprocket. And you don't have to spend a lot of money on an anodized aluminum one with purple flames and 24k gold plated bolts. Just get a plain steel one- look around and you should be able to pick one up for about 20 bucks. You will need a shorter chain though- or cut out a few links and add a master link to put it back together. That's what I'd do... correction- I did! :ride:

what about steel vs aluminum sprockets?

I've read convincing arguments here for both: steel for strength, or aluminum for weight, with an x-factor in the fact that the sprockets spin... but then I get lost in the gyroscopic physics stuff.

if it's purely a question of $$, I'd expect that's a wash if you get more life out of a (cheaper) steel one, but better MPG with the costlier aluminum one.

does one provide better handling, speed, or other performance perks?

how much faster do the aluminum ones wear out?

As always, you smart fellers in here rock! :ride:

i just bought a 39 from motostrano. couldnt find it here. also who knows about chain length/link ratios or where to find a graph?

Just put my 39 rear on and i like it. I removed 2 links from my chain and added a master. I shouldve removed three and added one but it was trial and error this time. I also got a 16 for the front but am not sure it will clear. I dont really need it now but will keep it around for a rainy weekend. Ill post pics this week. I also recommend when changing sprockets, purchase new bolts.

what about steel vs aluminum sprockets?

I've read convincing arguments here for both: steel for strength, or aluminum for weight, with an x-factor in the fact that the sprockets spin... but then I get lost in the gyroscopic physics stuff.

if it's purely a question of $$, I'd expect that's a wash if you get more life out of a (cheaper) steel one, but better MPG with the costlier aluminum one.

does one provide better handling, speed, or other performance perks?

how much faster do the aluminum ones wear out?

As always, you smart fellers in here rock! :lame:

Aluminum won't last as long. Unless I were racing I wouldn't waist my money since steel is cheaper and will last a lot longer.:bonk:

I got drz400s, i ride more road than dirt, so if I go 41T SPROCKET, I just buy a chain for a SM model, will that work, save 44T Sprocket & chain that came with S model in case I put it back. Is it Just that easy.

what about steel vs aluminum sprockets?

I've read convincing arguments here for both: steel for strength, or aluminum for weight, with an x-factor in the fact that the sprockets spin... but then I get lost in the gyroscopic physics stuff.

if it's purely a question of $$, I'd expect that's a wash if you get more life out of a (cheaper) steel one, but better MPG with the costlier aluminum one.

does one provide better handling, speed, or other performance perks?

how much faster do the aluminum ones wear out?

As always, you smart fellers in here rock! :worthy:

Steel last 5 times longer than aluminum (minimum), its not even a close race. 

Steel last 5 times longer than aluminum (minimum), its not even a close race. 

I doubt that very much, that would mean that the aluminum sprocket I had on my last road bike which had already done 25000 Kilometres and still serviceable would have been totally eclipsed by a steel one which would mean a steel one would exceed 125000 Kilometres. 

Yes aluminum is not as durable as steel, especially under harsh operating conditions but more often than not it's the chain which gives up first and accelerates the wear on sprockets.

Just like any other mechanical component, good maintenance equates to good service life.

I doubt that very much, that would mean that the aluminum sprocket I had on my last road bike which had already done 25000 Kilometres and still serviceable would have been totally eclipsed by a steel one which would mean a steel one would exceed 125000 Kilometres. 

Yes aluminum is not as durable as steel, especially under harsh operating conditions but more often than not it's the chain which gives up first and accelerates the wear on sprockets.

Just like any other mechanical component, good maintenance equates to good service life.

I doubt?

 

I don't doubt, Ive been riding and racing over 40 years, chains eat aluminum at a far far faster rate than Steel, back in the 70's steel was what you got, in the 80's aluminum became the rave, and replacing aluminum yearly( I lived it), wasn't until I went back to steel in the early 2000's I saw the Holy shtt difference. I have a street bike with 110,000 miles with original steel rear, while I intend to change it next chain, Id luv to see an aluminum with that amount.

 

Chains are different topic,  and so are front sprockets, but with aluminum rears you'll be replacing the whole shebang every year or every chain(they wear and they wear a lot). But on a street bike, with a strong film strength lube, steel rears are near life time items in comparison to aluminum.

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