Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Inner tube/outer tube fork separation question

Recommended Posts

I searched and found answers, but am still unsure of the 'right' answer. I'm changing fork oil and seals at the moment and ran into a snag. Went to separate the inner tube from outer by loosening the nut at the bottom of the fork, and noticed that the manual points to a specific tool to hold the retainer nut from the inside of the inner tube. Guessing I'm SOL for separating them without it, unless there's another trick? I started to pry the seal out, but stopped short of damaging anything when it wouldn't budge. Reason being, they're leaking and I wanted to replace, and discovered that I can clean them out and they should be fine (they were just replaced by a suspension shop about 4 months ago, no reason for them to be bad already). Anyway, while I've still got them apart, is there a way to separate them without that special tool, or no? Thanks gents 🙂

Also, when I dumped the right fork, the oil was a bit milky/contaminated. How are ya'll cleaning out the inside of the forks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Air wrench..Ive done many without the tool.Keep constant pull on the slider with short blasts of the wrench.As far as cleaning i'll do it in the solvent tank,but if you don't have one let it drain real good then use a spray contact cleaner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The slider, meaning the tube sticking out the top of the inner fork? I got one to spin but saw it was also spinning that retaining nut inside. Will it matter if it stays that way, or do I need to re-tighten it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The slider, meaning the tube sticking out the top of the inner fork? I got one to spin but saw it was also spinning that retaining nut inside. Will it matter if it stays that way, or do I need to re-tighten it?

Do you mean the rod with the jam nut under the cap??It will need to be locked down when it's all done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put the spring back in. Cap back on. Fork tube upside sown. Air or electric impact to remove the lower valve. Press down to load the spring to stop the inner tube from rotating. Generally works great. But didn't you just say you did not need to take the forks apart to clean the seals??

Or you can make the "special tool". A piece of pipe that will slip over the damper rod with a hex nut of the right size (1 1/16 inch, 27mm) welded on the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The inner damper body (not the damper rod that slides in and out) needs to be tight. You hold the damper body with the "special tool". Buy or make or use air wrench. All as explained above.

Yes the damper rod jam nut gets tightened to the cap after the spring is in. Damper rod must first be fully threaded into the cap. In the cap, fully back off the damper screw before reassembly.

In the damper rod, first the spring, then the valve pointed end down, then the push rod.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I'm giving up on trying to separate them. Don't have an impact gun (or compressor) so I tried pulling as hard as I could on the slider while the wife wrenched the bottom, no luck. The one I 'loosened' isn't really loose, it turns with about 30 ft. lbs. along with the jam nut. I'm just going to clean the seals out with a feeler gauge, spray some contact cleaner in the tubes to clean them out, roll in the new oil, and cross my fingers that nothing leaks...thanks for the info guys! Grats!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...