Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Lowering a 07 TE 450

Recommended Posts

Has anybody lowered there TE450 by moving the fork tubes up. And lowering the rear by taking some prelaod out of the rear shock if so how does it feel.

2007 Husky TE 450

2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

1975 Norton 850 Cammando 850 MK111

1983 Suzuki Katana 1100SD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I raised my fork tubes but used Koubalinks to lower the rear. Placing wood blocks under your feet while seated on the bike can help you determine how much you want to lower the bike before changing anything. Much cheaper than trial and error on expensive suspension parts. Lower it the minimum you can handle, don't lose too much travel.

I am 5'7" and had an auto upholstery show cut my seat to help with the seat height.

Your sag is not a method for lowering the bike but the amount of travel needed when riding. When set properly it should be about 3.75 to 4.0 inches. That is measured with both wheels off the ground and measured again with both wheels on the ground and you mounted dressed to ride. Measure the center of rear axle and to an imaginary line from the center of the side panel attaching bolt. You should find an illustration of this measurement in your owners manual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto. I receive many emails/calls that say something along the lines of "how much more can I lower the rear if I increase sag to, another inch or two from what I'm supposed to have it at...can I lower it by doing that?"

When I tell them their 12 inches of travel is supposed to have 4 inches of sag, thus giving them 8 inches of travel "left"...and if they put in another 2 they theoretically have just 6 inches to handle that gnarly big ditch that is probably going to ruin their day.

That's a very elementary and not 100% correct explanation, but it really, really gets the point across that correct sag is utterly crucial.

Your sag is not a method for lowering the bike but the amount of travel needed when riding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ditto. I receive many emails/calls that say something along the lines of "how much more can I lower the rear if I increase sag to, another inch or two from what I'm supposed to have it at...can I lower it by doing that?"

When I tell them their 12 inches of travel is supposed to have 4 inches of sag, thus giving them 8 inches of travel "left"...and if they put in another 2 they theoretically have just 6 inches to handle that gnarly big ditch that is probably going to ruin their day.

That's a very elementary and not 100% correct explanation, but it really, really gets the point across that correct sag is utterly crucial.

But surely when a suspension shop alters your suspension to reduce seat height, you are also reducing travel. sorry don't mean to diss your statement, just a question as i know very little about suspension

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But surely when a suspension shop alters your suspension to reduce seat height, you are also reducing travel.......

Suspension just can't be covered completely in a simple post, but you are correct....if a shop goes in and installs travel limiting spacers, you do loose travel. However you still need to maintain proper race/rider sag adjusted to approximately 1/3 the remaining travel for good control/handling.

On my bike for example, I wanted to get 1 1/2" lower seat height, so the shop installed travel limiting spacers to take 1 1/2" out of the travel.

Didn't work out quite like I wanted, or as well as I had hoped and I will be redoing my suspension, but regardless of that.....if I use the 12" travel mentioned above, the spacers cut that down to 10.5". My rider sag, was then set closer to 85-90mm, or +/-3.5" ....approx 1/3 travel.

Lowering links revise the suspension geometery slightly, allowing the rear of the bike to lower with little, if any, loss of actual rear wheel travel.

Forks are then pushed up in the clamps and rear sag is set per link mfrs recommendation to retain the bikes proper handling.

(recommended set-up is also important so you don't slam the tires into the fenders too hard if you still want to take big jumps on a lowered bike......some give and take here)

Reducing the sag way past recommended settings to lower seat height makes the rear end too soft, affects steering and throws the suspension out of balance, which gives less control and handling problems, making the bike unsafe in many riding conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

StreetFighter: I've got a Kouba 1.5" lowering link that I don't need. It has about 100 miles of use on it. Yours for $100. PM me if you want it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct!

If a lowering link has an increased leverage ratio a bike can actually GAIN rear wheel travel.

Suspension just can't be covered completely in a simple post,

Lowering links revise the suspension geometery slightly, allowing the rear of the bike to lower with little, if any, loss of actual rear wheel travel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
StreetFighter: I've got a Kouba 1.5" lowering link that I don't need. It has about 100 miles of use on it. Yours for $100. PM me if you want it.

Wish i had seen this 1/2 hour ago

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...