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Wheelie / brake ?

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I know you need to cover the rear brake while doing wheelies. I have my brake lever adjusted as low as it'll go, but I still have a problem covering it without making it drag while practicing wheelies with my riding boots on.

Any suggestions on something I might be missing?

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I know you need to cover the rear brake while doing wheelies. I have my brake lever adjusted as low as it'll go, but I still have a problem covering it without making it drag while practicing wheelies with my riding boots on.

Any suggestions on something I might be missing?

I'd give a more flexible riding boot a try? I run my brake lever stop even with the footpeg with somewhere between 1/2" and 1" of free-travel.

If you're on a 4 stroke, you can, many times, ride with your foot to the right of the lever and use compression to control the balance point, and quickly transfer to the lever in an instant if needed.............. it takes practice, but is possible.

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It's a DRZ and as soon as I let off the throttle it comes down, but I'd like to get it up a tad higher and be good enough to ride the brake/throttle to keep it going at a slower speed. My ankles aren't as flexible as they use to be - they're both been broken.

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When I first learned to wheelie, I used the engine braking to get her balanced... :worthy:

As I learned from better stunters/riders, and started clutching wheelies up, I learned to controll the height/balance point of the wheelie with the rear brake...

It really important to learn to use the rear brake to "catch" the bike as it comes into or up to B.P....

Once you get this technique down, you can roll your wheelies really really slow, which is really cool... 🙂

Cause once you can roll her slow, circles are within your grasps... :D

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I think part of it is how I have my streetable drz geared. It was 15/48 and I installed a 41 for better cruizing rpm's. I like it, but it makes my 1st and 2nd gear wheelies go faster than I want.

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i've been stunting riding street bikes for years and the easiest thing to learn on is an xr50. Once you learn rear brake control on that you can apply it to your dirtbike its also easy to learn circle wheels on the 50. Another thing that might help try raising your rear brake lever instead of lowering it, i have the lever on my stunt bike and my dirt bike set above the peg .

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It was 15/48 and I installed a 41 for better cruizing rpm's. I like it, but it makes my 1st and 2nd gear wheelies go faster than I want.

If you're not using your clutch to get that wheelie up to or close to Balance Point (BP), then chances are you're getting your wheelies up on power...

The bad thing about that is that you'll start the wheelie going pretty quick because your accelarating the bike hard to get it up... :ride:

That fine, but you'll have to commit and get it up to BP as quickly as possible...

Once there, you can slow down the wheelie by going past BP and catching the bike with the rear brake... :D

Its gonna feel like you're gonna loop in the beginning :banghead: , but as you practice more, you'll get better feel for this technique... :worthy:

The more vertical or closer to 12 you go, the slower you'll go...

Good luck, and take it slow...

Work on clutching, it'll make a world of difference, because you're not starting the wheelie by "chasing"...

You can start the wheelie at slower speed, get it up to or close to BP quicker, while still staying in the meat of the bike's powerband, and not close to over revving...

By combining this with the rear brake control, you'll have a slow wheelie, because you'll start off slower, and can keep it slow, holding in at BP...

Hope that helps... 🙂

Sorry for being so looooong winded... :banghead:

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could you explain the technique for cluthcing it up? I have always just done power wheelies but I would like to learn to clutch it up. I'm on a yz 250 BTW thanks

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There are a ton of videos on youtube teaching how to clutch wheelies. Just do a search for them. Heres one:

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From my understanding, you cruise along at X rpm, pull in the clutch and release it. Do not hammer on the throttle while pulling in the clutch, just keep it steady. Seems to work for me but I don't try to get it too high yet. When I use to ride 2 strokes I just tried to bring it up right when it hit the powerband. I used the PB as my clutch. I'm nowhere near as expert though. 🙂

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Clutch wheelies are not that big of a mystery...

It just takes time and practice... :worthy:

Each bike will clutch up differently...

A street bike will be very different from a dirt or motard...

Even the size and type of the street or dirt bike will make each behave differently to clutching a wheelie...

The key is learning and knowing "your" bike...

Start off slow...

Don't just watch that or any other video, and go out, "get it up to 7Gs and give it a little gas, and dump the clutch while pulling up on the handlebars"...

For starters, the only bike that I had to yank or pull up on the handlebars to wheelie was my stock fiddy...

Most if not all of the really good wheelie guys will tell you never to yank on the bar while clutching (unless the bike is totally underpowered)...

That can get you into trouble really quick...:ride:

My motard and dirt bikes has way more torque than my street bike, and the powerband is totally different...

Even my two street bike will need different rpms to get them up to BP on clutch...

Getting back to clutching...:banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

Go out on "your" bike, and start off slow...

Get rolling at about 10 mph...

Try using second gear, if your bike has a lot of torque...

If not, you can use 1st...

Pull the clutch in, and give it just a little bit of throttle to before releasing the clutch smoothly and quickly...

Your first try might not even get the wheel off the ground, but thats ok (Remember to cover that rear brake no matter what)... 🙂

Do it again, and again, adding more throttle each time before releasing the clutch...

You'll notice that the front end will get lighter and lighter each time, until it starts to lift...

Once it starts to do that, start learning the habit of bringing it down with the rear brake, and not by chopping that throttle...

This is really important, because using your rear brake to control the height of your wheelies should become second-nature...

The more you do this, the more comfortable you'll get with that front wheel being in the air...

Next thing you'll know, you'll be wheelieing like a pro... :banghead::D

Just remember, the idea behind clutch wheelies, is to get the bike as close to the BP as possible on that first hit...

That way, you'll still have the rest of the powerband in that gear to ride her out...

Go slow and practice at your own pace...

No need to prove anything to anybody, or impress anyone...

Ride safe and ride with your gear... :banghead:

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I know you need to cover the rear brake while doing wheelies. I have my brake lever adjusted as low as it'll go, but I still have a problem covering it without making it drag while practicing wheelies with my riding boots on.

Any suggestions on something I might be missing?

Dwight recommends a stronger return spring on the rear brake lever for several different reasons, it may solve your issue also. Definitely an inexpensive option worth trying.

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I run my brake lever stop even with the footpeg with somewhere between 1/2" and 1" of free-travel.

.

x2 🙂

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To get the feel for clutching up the bike, try it sitting still, with your left foot on the ground. Your right foot will still be covering the brake. Open the throttle a bit and quickly but smoothly release the clutch. Try just lifting the front wheel 6 inches or so and tap the rear brake to bring it back down. You may have to adjust your body position from front to back. Practice getting the front tire as high as you are comfortable with. After a while you will be able to start a slow rolling wheelie from a dead stop with both feet on the pegs, kinda like the trials guys do.

Hope this helps

Ian

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Using the rear brake is a great step in riding slow controlled wheelies, but again, it's not an imperative. This picture is of me when I was 13 (1980) riding wheelies on a 1978 MR175 (2 stroke), and as you can see, I don't have access to the rear brake standing on the seat. I could ride them in 1st gear as long as I had some front wheel spin, and road to travel. Learning to wheelie just takes a lot of practice.

1978MR175in1980.jpg

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